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Crossover SUV Comparison

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Comments

  • arumagearumage Posts: 922
    People know what they like when they drive a vehicle. That's driving dynamics. They just wouldn't call it that. :)

    The Quest is also significantly overpriced for what it offers. You can push it over $41k. Besides, minivans are very "inside-the-box" things. You can't make them too wild or people won't buy them.

    People want crossovers because they think they are thinking "outside-the-box". If Ford can price this thing right and get the engineering right, I think they can significantly impact both markets.
  • loachloach Posts: 246
    I will only put them in the third row when the grandparents are visiting (too old to get in the third row) and I need AWD and haven't found a minivan that has AWD (I think there is one, but only one).
    so are the captains chairs in the 2nd row worth it in the long run for the Acadia?


    The Toyota Sienna is still available in AWD, but be aware that it comes with run-flat tires (no spare) that many owners have complained wear out fast and are expensive to replace.
  • freealfasfreealfas Posts: 652
    "Boxy is not why people don't like minivans. It's more about the poor driving dynamics and the stigma they have."

    Trust me, it's boxy combined with the soccer mom image. Personally I like the fact I look out over a hood of reasonable dimension and have a crumple zone of some size in front of me & my family regardless of the safety numbers the mini-vans post.

    "Probably 2/3 of the people in the crossover/minivan market have no idea what driving dynamics are..."

    And add even more then that when you include all the arm chair test drivers in the various forums around the web who think their high school driver's ed is proper driver training and criticize, speculate on, and post opinion as fact on a car/truck/CUV because they parked next to one one day at the mall...but I digress...

    back on topic,

    "My prediction is that many people will shy away from the Flex because of the design"

    People will embrace it specifically for the design, it looks like an xb(looks much better than any xb in my opinion) or even a xxxxl mini when you squint. If they get the interior right on it I might line up for one. Just wish it had a CVT.

    The Quest is hardly an apples to apples scenario here. Nissan missed the mark plain and simple from solid competition. If Ford can take the year to screw this thing together properly and price it correctly it has great potential as it is more handsome than the lambda triplets, less cartoonish than the mazda, potentailly a better value than all of them and I'll take Volvo safety every day of the week if it is indeed based on Volvo underpinnings. It could be a winner.
  • loachloach Posts: 246
    OK, since we are getting into some more crossovers, we're going to rename this one - apologies in advance for any confusion.

    Crossover SUV Comparison - nice ring to it eh?


    Might I suggest adding "3-Row" to the title? Would hate to see this thread expand to include Edge, CX-7, Murano, Equinox, etc.
  • joe97joe97 Posts: 2,248
    Good point there. The Edge is the only one up there without a third row. If the Edge gets the pass, then a host of other vehicles should be included as well.

    We forgot the Santa Fe...
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    My prediction is that many people will shy away from the Flex because of the design. Remember, Nissan tried to think out of the box and the Quest has been a sales disappointment,

    Ah, but! Nissan has had solid hits with the Maxima and Altima, 350Z, Titan and Armada.....so one failure with the Quest isn't all bad. The Flex resembles the concepts of the FJ Cruiser, and will appeal to the same crowd, who likes to be "different", but wants an automatic transmission. If it's realy comfortable and made well, it'll sell....
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,981
    Y'all kept saying Flex and I kept thinking Edge. :blush:

    The search engines don't like long titles, so let's try it a while like it is and see how it works.

    We'll save the last available category for the Flex when it hits our lists.
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    Flex vs Freestyle? Other than exterior style, what's the difference?
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,981
    I think the Flex platform is a bit different, but I can't keep up with all the changes. Some say the Edge was really going to be the Freestyle replacement, but the Freestyle isn't going away last I heard.

    Who's got the scorecard?
  • drfilldrfill Posts: 2,484
    Though Edmunds doesn't seem enamored, and have said the CX-7 is clearly better.

    I don't see anything really good happening for Ford, in general, this year, into next. Ford Flex looks like an overgrown Mini Cooper, without the style or anything nice.

    If anyone can see a bright spot, let me know. New Forum is up: Is Ford's End Right Behind Chrysler's?:

    http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/WebX/.f12b513

    DrFill
  • arumagearumage Posts: 922
    The Ford Flex reeks of style. That's like saying the xB has no style. The Flex sort of has a funky retro style about it. That being said, I don't think the Flex is everybody's cup of tea. The CX-7 is not a competitor for the Flex anyway. The Edge is a CX-7 competitor. The CX-9 is a competitor for the Flex. While the Flex is not as good looking as the CX-9, IMO, it has far more utility. Anybody who has "ducked" into a CX-9, opened those huge rear doors, or tried to sit in the 3rd row (especially if you are tall) could see all the utility of the Flex. The Flex looks to have legroom for days (especially if it has 5" more 2nd row legroom than the Freestyle, as it says on the website) and storage behind the 3rd row to match.
  • gregg_vwgregg_vw Posts: 2,419
    I think more eyes will be drawn to the Flex than the CX-9, regardless if the glance is admiring. It will stand out more, and that is something Ford needs. But it needs this now, not in a year and 3 months from now. What poor planning!!
  • mrblonde49mrblonde49 Posts: 626
    The Quest is hardly an apples to apples scenario here. Nissan missed the mark plain and simple from solid competition."

    We could be saying the same thing in 3 years about the Flex. The competition here is more intense than the minivan segment ever was...

    "If Ford can take the year to screw this thing together properly and price it correctly it has great potential as it is more handsome than the lambda triplets, less cartoonish than the mazda, potentailly a better value than all of them and I'll take Volvo safety every day of the week if it is indeed based on Volvo underpinnings. It could be a winner."

    More handsome is very subjective. The Lamdas have been very well received for looks and overall package thus far. The bottom line is that many people don't like boxy. If they did, there would be more than 3-4 boxy vehicles produced, wouldn't there?
  • mrblonde49mrblonde49 Posts: 626
    Ah, but! Nissan has had solid hits with the Maxima and Altima, 350Z, Titan and Armada.....so one failure with the Quest isn't all bad. "

    I don't see the relevence of the other Nissan vehicles. If anything, the success of the others should have laid the groundowrk for Quest success. The point was that the Quest was radical design for a family mover, like the Flex is, and people largely ignored it...
  • arumagearumage Posts: 922
    I think the sharing of style between Nissan and Renault is what hurt the Quest. There is alot of criticism of the new Sentra for this as well. The designs mentioned as successes were designed with the American market in mind. The Flex, while radical in design, certainly is American in design. If it has any connection to foreign design, it would be Japanese (Kei car on a much grander scale) or Land Rover, which is still popular in the States.
  • gregg_vwgregg_vw Posts: 2,419
    Exactly. The Flex has a Land Rover-ness to it that will serve it well. On the other hand, the Quest was radical like the 1996 guppy Taurus was radical. Sometimes radical is not attractive or appealing in any appreciable way. Also, think Honda Element or Scion xB v. Pontiac Aztec. while many people cannot stand the xB, some find it very appealing. But no one thought the Aztec (or Quest) was cool. When a vehicle looks pregnant or badly misshapen, buyers do not flock to it.
  • wlbrown9wlbrown9 Posts: 837
    Okay, I went to the Flex site and took a look. From the side view it looks as if they took my '00 Isuzu Trooper and stretched it out a little and left the spare off the rear door.. Also, it looks to be just a little shorter in height than the Trooper. I like my Trooper, but I just don't think Ford building the replacement is a real fit.

    Sorry, but this comes in a distant last in style compared to the CX9 & Lambadas. Might be an attempt at a 'retro' style, but IMHO it just does not work.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    I agree, Ford needs the Flex now not in a year or more. Sounds like a Microsoft promotion. I do like the pictures. I have hated most of the egg shaped SUV/CUV offerings over the last 5 years. Then I lean toward the last generation Suburban and Tahoe designs. I need to go look at the Acadia. I will have bought a new SUV or CUV by the time the Flex hits the showrooms.
  • loachloach Posts: 246
    As those who have read my posts probably know, I have been leaning toward the Acadia. I had tentatively eliminated the CX-9 from contention at the auto show based on the interior being a bit too tight for our family (and my wife's reaction to the size of the rear doors). But I liked it well enough that I thought I'd better at least drive one. So here are my brief thoughts (drove a Grand Touring because memory seats are a requirement for us):

    Handling - Overall thought it handled a little better than the Acadia. I agree it drives "smaller" than it is. Body roll in corners seemed similar to Acadia.
    Ride - Acadia rides better. I suspect part of this is the 20" wheels on the GT. The 18's may be better but that doesn't help me.
    Visibility - This surprised me a little because I expected it to be no better than Acadia given the rear styling, but I felt it offered a better 360 degree view of the road than Acadia.
    Interior space - Much tougher to get into the 3rd row of CX-9 than in the Acadia. Couldn't adjust all three rows to be comfortable for me (6'0" tall) at the same time. Could in the Acadia.

    Overall, I like both vehicles, but it still looks like Acadia will win for us due primarily to our interior space needs. But if I was replacing my Pathfinder instead of my wife's minivan, the CX-9 would be a stronger contender because interior space wouldn't be as big an issue and I could blow off the memory seats and get a model with the 18" wheels.
  • jcorn20jcorn20 Posts: 6
    I see the 2nd row legroom in the Acadia is 36.9. Is this the figure with the seats moved all the way back or is this a minimum value?
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