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Ford Explorer Maintenance and Repair

1959698100101312

Comments

  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    Interesting.....not had that problem either. 27,000 miles so far. Actually, this Mountaineer has given me practically no problems at all. Very satisfied with it. Would recommend it.
  • wijocowijoco Posts: 462
    The "multifunction switch" would be your wiper/turnsignal stalk. If the cruise switch is part of that stalk, then you would be in luck.
  • kelly55kelly55 Posts: 2
    I had a very similar problem with my '96 Explorer two weeks ago. My car would go into reverse but would not go forward. What I found out was that one of the tire rods was broken. This is just one of many problems that I've experienced with my truck. Good Luck!
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    Tie rod did that? I'm very surprised..... Never heard of that problem before.
  • I have heard a similar noise comming from the rear of my 02 XLT. Did you hear it during all driving conditions?
  • kelly55kelly55 Posts: 2
    No one including the mechanic who fixed the tire rod had see that happen before. When I first realized there was a problem I heard some grinding noise under the car. I only heard the noise when I first put the car in reverse. After that I drove the car and by that evening the car wouldn't go forward. The guy who towed the car said it could have been the front calipers so I guess that could also be the problem.
  • swschradswschrad Posts: 2,171
    and the tie rod was a bonus calamity.
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    Yeah, I would agree.
  • I can hear the humming noise when I'm going between 50-55 mph and about 1900 rpm when I gas it. When I lift, there's no noise. Tap the gas and it's back. The Ford Dealer told me it's louder when the differential is under strain. I can't hear it at 70 - maybe the wind noise drowns it out.
  • bioman3bioman3 Posts: 37
    After a pretty mean thunderstorm, my 99 XLT, 4.0 SOHC with 50K on the odometer began stalling after startup. If I kept my foot on the accelerator, I was able to drive the truck, but the idle was very low, about 350- 400 rpm at normal operating temperature. It drove normally, no missing, normal shift pattern and acceleration. The next morning the stalling at startup began again. This time since, I was in my garage, I took out my scan tool and found no error codes in the computer memory. I turned up the base idle screw, disconnected and re connected the negative battery cable, cleaned out the carbon from the throttle body and checked the upper intake manifold bolts for proper torque. When I re connected the scan tool the reading with the engine running were normal. The truck started up and kept running when I removed my foot from the accelerator. In fact, I had to turn down the base idle screw to get the truck to idle at 750-800 RPM in neutral. All seems well now, but are there any theories out there to explain this bizzare behavior? In the past I have driven the truck through monsoons and nothing happened. Could the water have caused the stalling? Is there a sensor getting ready to go? If nothing else, lets generate some interesting discussions!!

    Thanks,

    Bioman
  • idntnvuidntnvu Posts: 251
    Ahhhh, the notorious signal stalk. I have noticed that when just driving down the road that the wipers will turn on by themselves...hopefully this will correct that. I plan to take the explorer to the dealer next week for the recalls. So far it's Jumper Harness, Multifuction Switch, Cruise Control, and Seat. Any others that I should know about?
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    Well, my Oldsmobile used to do this same thing, and it was the idle position solenoid working, not working, working, not working, which the Olds was notorious for doing. I've not heard of a Ford doing this, but it could. That would be my guess. But it may not do it again, or it may.
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    The wipers coming on voluntarily was a switch malfunction that a TSB was out on a while ago. If you don't fix it, you could have a fire, although I don't know of anybody who has. I guess if you start the car, you could have a fire, anything's possible, but I'd check with the dealer on that. It should have been repaired by now.
  • idntnvuidntnvu Posts: 251
    Yeah, thats what I thought myself. I knew I hadn't heard about that being a recall or TSB recently, but I think this explorer had been on the market a while before I wound up with it. It was leased through Ford Motor Credit, and then sold at auction to the dealership from which I bought it. Not sure how long that actually took, but the website says, according to the VIN, that it hasn't been repaired on this particular vehicle. I will get it repaired ASAP. What other recalls/TSBs have been put out affecting '99 Explorers in the past? Just want to know what all could have been a problem.
  • nvbankernvbanker Posts: 7,285
    I think that's about it. Maybe a seat bolt recall or cruise control cable.
  • swschradswschrad Posts: 2,171
    but basically I think there was a seat belt thing, and if you have the 4.0L dual-cam engine, the internal ford replacement policy for getting the nylon camshaft limiters out and putting steel ones in.
  • ogbonnaogbonna Posts: 25
    I have changed: Spark plugs and wire, Pvc, Fuel cap used fuel injection cleaner, used a higher arctain........Any suggestions
  • Wondering if anyone can advise me as to whether I should get a 04 Pilot or Explorer (4WD V8). I've always liked Fords and I think they stand behind there vehicles better than Honda, but its a lot of money for either and I just don't want to make a mistake.
  • wijocowijoco Posts: 462
    Howdy, a few questions:
    -does it miss at idle, high-speed, cruise, and/or acceleration
    -does the idle "lope" up and down in park
    -is the problem worse when the vehicle is cool or fully warmed up

    An ignition miss will be more noticeable under acceleration or at heavy/part throttle. An airflow problem (too much air from a vaccuum leak or too little from restricted throttle body passages) will be more noticeable at idle. Reason being, a small amount of air is required to idle an engine. Any excess or shortage of air mass will cause idle problems. But less voltage is required to ignite the small amount of fuel at idle, so ignition trouble is less noticeable. With the throttle open, more voltage is required to ignite the increased fuel charge, so a deficiency in available spark will feel like a sharp repetitive bucking or jerking. But an airflow irregularity will be less noticeable because so much more air is being introduced anyway. A fuel pressure problem can only be diagnosed with a pressure tester. Look for the obvious stuff first like leaking vacuum lines or cruddy throttle body plates.
  • swschradswschrad Posts: 2,171
    starting anywhere from 50K to 60K miles, drivers have been muttering about idle problems on these boards that clean up after the EGR valve is cleaned or replaced. I never had issues with my 4-banger in the ranger, but my V6 buick did, and I had to replace the EGR at about 70,000 in that. if it's full of carbon when you take out the two bolts and look underneath, it's time.
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