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Toyota 4Runner

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Comments

  • autoboy16autoboy16 Posts: 992
    Have you looked at the 2006 Mercury Mountaineers, Nissan Pathfinder, or Vw Touareg? The mountaineer is essentially the same as the explorer but much nicer inside :surprise: ! If you buy one top of the line, its cheaper than an explorer and comes standard with a 3rd row of seats(power for an extra $450) and has power running-boards like a navigator (they come out when a door is opened and go in when door is closed) as an option. The pathfinder is about equal in price and has about 20hp less than the v8 in either explorer or mountaineer. The nissan comes standard with a 3rd row of seats and has great gas mileage :) and a large payload and towing capacity. The touareg has more power than all 3 i mentioned when comparing v6s to v6s and to v8sto v8s but is the most expensive :sick:. Overall, I'd recommend the 4runner unless you need a 3rd row of seats :).
  • moto7moto7 Posts: 13
    Yes, looked at all those you mentioned (except Toureg and likewise Volvo XC90 - way too expensive and reliability reports depressing). MY personal impressions - Pathfinder - don't care for the new chopped off rear appearance. Explorer/Mountaineer - "look" too big and unimpressive MPG. Which led me to the 4runner (your final suggestion). From what I've read, heard, the Toyota will be dependdable, offer performance/features i need.
  • runner06runner06 Posts: 1
    Does anyone know if toyota is gonna continue production of the 4Runner after 2007. I've talked to some people and they told me that a new SUV (the Toyota Fortuner) is going to take the place of the 4Runner in the future. Does anyone know if this is true?
  • thomasrcthomasrc Posts: 1
    I have a 1997 Toyota 4runner with the 4 cyl. engine and manual trans. Everything is stock. The stated towing capacity is 5000 lbs. for the vehicle. My question is can I tow a 19 foot boat with a boat/trailer weight of about 1900 with the 4 cyl. engine?
  • tjimtjim Posts: 3
    Forget the factory nav system and pick up a Garmin StreetPilot for about $500. You can use it with multiple vehicles. Girl friend loves hers, and it's remarkably accurate and user-friendly
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    Does yours have the towing package? And are you sure about the 5000 pound limit? I thought that was with the V-6. Not sure though. The dealer could give you these answers pretty quickly if the manual does not, and no-one else here responds.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • loulloul Posts: 8
    I would be doubtful '97 w/4Cyl w/stick-shift has 5,000 lb tow rating. That's the rating for the 2006 V6 w/Automatic.

    The 4.7L V8 is only rated at 7,000 lbs (I have one).

    Our former tow vehicle (a '97 Explorer 4.0L V6 w/Stick-shift) was only 2,600 lbs!

    Check your manual for your specs.

    Lou
  • blov8rblov8r Posts: 567
    Has anyone here had road stability difficulties with their 4Runner? I'm inquiring because a number of posters on the Lexus GX470 board, myself included, have noted that keeping the vehicle straight on a straight highway isn't easy, that they start swaying w/ the slightest breeze at speeds above 70, and at speeds above 80 they're simply unstable even without wind. There's a constant fight with the steering wheel to keep the GX on the straight and narrow. There have also been several complaints about the cruise control downshifting and upshifting with even slight changes in road contour. Overall, we're VERY disappointed with these SUV's and in my personal experience the Grand Cherokee we traded in for the GX was a FAR better road vehicle. Is this unique to the Lexus brand or is it endemic to the Toyota breed? Thanks. Bart :shades:
  • kheintz1kheintz1 Posts: 213
    I'm the original owner of an '03 4Runner Limited (V8, AWD, Michelin Cross Terrains rotated every 5000 miles). My truck has over 60,000 miles on the odometer, and I've never experienced any of the problems you've mentioned. Quite the contrary, in fact-- my 4Runner is the best handling, smoothest, and most sure-footed, sure-tracking SUV I've ever owned. My truck's powerful, torque-ladened V8 engine and 5-speed tranny, perform smoothly and effortlessly when the cruise-control is engaged, and I drive my truck about 400 miles/week, mostly on highways, and typically at cruising speeds between 75-85 mph.

    Ive not driven the Lexus GX470, but I've seen plenty of them on the road, and they strike me as looking rather top-heavy and tall compared with the 4Runner. Maybe this excessive height and top-heaviness has something to do with your complaints regarding tracking and steering at highway speeds?

    Aside from checking alignment, etc., I think there are two other important issues to consider: (1) The quality and condition of the tires. I firmly believe that Michelin Cross Terrains are the finest general-purpose SUV tires, and I know a number of master technicians who feel the same way. I've repeatedly heard these technicians opine that when a vehicle continues to have handling problems after all other conceivable remedies have been exhausted, a switch to a new set of Cross Terrains often solves or greatly improves the problem. (2) Even when driving on Cross Terrains, it is essential to have these or any other tires "road-force balanced". http://www.craigautometrics.com/huntergsp9700.htm If your Lexus/Toyota service center doesn't own a road-force balancing machine with trained and experienced technicians, look for another shop that does.
  • blov8rblov8r Posts: 567
    Maybe this excessive height and top-heaviness has something to do with your complaints regarding tracking and steering at highway speeds?

    Thank you for your thorough response, and you're confirming a suspicion of mine ... the GX470 is top-heavy w/ too much freeboard to act like a sail. It's also interesting that you comment on the Michelin Cross Terrains ... those tires were recommended to me by a local guru on cars/trucks. Bart :) :shades:
  • canddmeyercanddmeyer Posts: 382
    Some of this is true for me. In crosswinds or headwinds, I cannot drive a straight line. But in no wind or tailwind, I can cruise at 90mph effortlessly. I have the SR5 suspension. No problems with the cruise control other than it losing its memory when braking to a stop, then having to reset it again. Road noise and the bouncy ride bother me most. I just slow down in windy conditions.

    Needless to say, I'm looking at a Mercury Mountaineer at the moment. Unlike the 4Runner, I can sit in a Mountaineer (or Explorer) with a sunroof and not have my head resting on the ceiling. The Ford/Mercury is MUCH quieter inside, and I can get a slew of options I want like electrochromatic rearview mirror, heated outside mirrors, and side airbags at a price thousands less than a comparable Toyota. 0% financing, Sirius satellite radio availability, and supplier pricing help too. The only negative is Ford quality, but my Toyota hasn't been troublefree either. No ashtray on either vehicle bothers me too.
  • agnostoagnosto Posts: 205
    I am the owner of a new 2006 4Runner LTD V8 4WD with less that 2,000 miles and I have driven at various speeds from 65-102mph effortlessly, and I was surpised of the handling improvement versus to a new previous 1999 4Runner LTD V6 4WD I used to own. I have the original Michelin Cross Terrain and definitely these tires provide/contribute a lot to the superb solid/robust handling on the road at any speed level and most import with no steering wheel vibration (like I used to get with my old 1999 4Runner).
  • nedzelnedzel Posts: 787
    I've got 43,000 miles on my 03 4Runner LTD V8 4WD. The steering on the 4Runner is very quick (few turns lock-to-lock), very light, and has poor on-center feel. It is a tall vehicle so it is easily affected by cross-winds. The result is that it is a bit busy on the highway. My wife's MB C240 is much less tiring to drive on the highway -- it stays in the center of the lane effortlessly. The 4Runner wanders more and it is easy to overcorrect with the sensitive steering.

    I just replaced the OEM Dunlops with Cross Terrains. I haven't noticed a significant change in highway driving.

    I don't feel it is "unstable" in any way. Rather that it takes a lot of attention and small corrections to keep it in the center of the lane.
  • blov8rblov8r Posts: 567
    and has poor on-center feel. It is a tall vehicle so it is easily affected by cross-winds.

    My experience w/ my wife's Lexus ... this is what I was inquiring about. Bart :(
  • chuck1chuck1 Posts: 1,405
    "I just replaced the OEM Dunlops with Cross Terrains. I haven't noticed a significant change in highway driving."

    I can tell you based on my towing experience with my 05 4Runner that the Michelins have a much harder sidewall than the Donlaps. When I tow, I get no where near the sidewall flex I got with the Dunlaps.
  • kheintz1kheintz1 Posts: 213
    I've previously mentioned that I drive a minimum of 350 miles/week in my '03, AWD, 4Runner Limited, mostly on highways. At any rate, my truck just recently underwent its scheduled 60,000 mile servicing, and when I picked it up from my dealer's shop, I took the time to talk with a master technician about the condition of my truck's Michelin Cross Terrains. He agreed with me that my set of these tires will likely meet, and may well exceed, the manufacturer's claim of 75,000 miles of use before needing replacement.

    As to why my Cross Terrains have been aging so well, I can only speculate, but I firmly believe that road-force balancing, religious tire-rotation every 5000 miles, and attention to tire pressure, have been key factors. If you rotate the tires religiously, and you avoid overly aggressive and abusive driving habits, these superb tires should more than live up to their manufacturer's claims in terms of longevity.
  • blov8rblov8r Posts: 567
    75K miles! Great ... my wife's tires won't need to be changed for ten years! Bart :)
  • woodywwwoodyww Posts: 1,797
    Funny, I've been thinking of trading my 2000 528i (wagon) for a 2-3 y.o. 4runner. Partly because it's out of warranty, & has had a couple of relatively minor electrical problems. In the 4 1/5 years I've owned it (I bought it used-CPO), I think I've had it in for minor repairs twice (knock wood!). Mine has incredibly low miles tho--I'd suggest getting a lower-mileage car if you do buy one.

    FWIW, it's extremely stable at highway speeds, irregardless of wind, rain, etc. And the 5-series wagon ("Touring") holds a lot of "stuff", altho not as much as a 4Runner. A few of the posts here have me just about convinced to hang on to it. (I realize they are vastly different vehicles with different capabilities.....)
  • nedzelnedzel Posts: 787
    If you don't need the offroad capability of a 4Runner, then you may be better off staying with a station wagon or wagon-like vehicle.

    The 4Runner's offroad capability is its strength. But that strength comes at a significant cost. It handles pretty well -- for a truck. It brakes pretty well -- for a truck. It rides and drives pretty well -- for a truck. But there is no mistaking it for what it is -- a body-on-frame truck with pretty bad gas mileage.

    I have a 4Runner because a station wagon wouldn't get very far up the beach when I'm fishing. Nor would it get me up a snow-covered logging road when I'm hunting.

    That capability doesn't come for free and I don't understand why someone would accept those costs when they don't need the accompanying benefits.
  • navguynavguy Posts: 61
    06MY 4Runner includes an in-dash 4 disc CD changer that is MP3 and WMA compatible. Plus, you get Bluetooth integration with approved handsets! The new navigation is the most awesome thing ever!
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