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Jeep Wrangler

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Comments

  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Any way you can set up a water misting system for him?

    One way is to get a pump-up sprayer that holds at least a gallon. You can either use it 'as is' and just mist him (and yourself) with the wand, or maybe run some ¼" or so flexible tubing that been pierced with pin holes around the roll bar and connect it to the bare end of the wand. Just give it a blast every few minutes or so.

    The technology is well recognised and is often used when fixed around fans (the type that blow air!) at football games, or in amusement parks. It's the evaporation of the mist on your skin that gives the cooling effect. It won't hurt the Jeep at all and would be low cost enough to experiment with..................and of course, if you turn it into a commercial system I'd like my cut please. ;)
  • embeedueceembeeduece Posts: 260
    I'll be super impressed if Mac can solve this one!

    -Mike
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Hi Danamy3, you seem to have dropped into the wrong forum for your problem as this is the Jeep Wrangler section.

    Check out the 'Browse by Topic' on the left, drop down to 'Maint and Repair' then select 'Fuel'.

    Good luck.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I'll be super impressed if Mac can solve this one!

    I may not know all the answers, but I know where to find the answers! :P

    Actually, troubleshooting is pretty much the same for all vehicles, but it's knowing the particular idiosyncrasies for each one that helps get the answers more quickly.

    It sounds like the 'computer' isn't firing the fuel injectors in that particular case, but the trick is to know the likeliest component to fail first on a Subaru.
  • Sounds like it could be an oxygen sensor also. Subarus popping black smoke many times is the sensor. This is not a problem with just Subarus, the PCV valve is usually plumbed near oxy sensors and if it plugs or pops a piece of carbon and mung on the sensor your toast. The mechanics should have gotten a code off your computer for this problem. No oxy sensor, no fuel. just replacing the sensor could work, but many times the plumbing and PCV must be pulled and cleaned or replaced or particulate will just end up on thje Oxy sensor again. Cost my son about $200 to have it fixed on his Subaru.
    Spencer
  • redrocker15redrocker15 Posts: 102
    The only potential downfall to the mister for Tom deals with KY's summer humidity. From my experience in Indiana, running 85-95% RH (guessing it's the same for Tom's part of KY), these misters really only get you wet. I know they do use them at amusement parks and football games, but they're more effective when water (or sweat) on your skin really does want to evaporate. Still, if it leaves you an option to go topless, it's sure worth a try!

    A friend of mine here in OK rigged up a similar system for his speedboat. He used the tubing with small pin-holes (maybe even used nozzles intended for a drip irrigation system). Even though we have much higher RH than places like Utah or AZ, we only run 50% for the most part and the cooling effect is much more pronounced.

    Not trying to pooh-pooh a good suggestion, but wanted to point out the perils associated with humidity! What do our Alabama and Florida buddies say?

    Gary
  • redrocker15redrocker15 Posts: 102
    I reviewed a bunch of our postings, and see that many of us have really taken to using the emotorcons. I did notice one thing in our discussion area though.... I don't see any uses of this one - - :lemon:

    Hmmmm...... maybe that's because we're all firmly entrenched in this "Wrangler cult" thing.....? I know my wife has accused me and my boys of this! (And Randy needs to be careful, since he's plugging into all these Jeep accessorizing sites - - it's only a matter of time til his wife comes to a similar conclusion!)

    Gary
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    In high humidity and still air it will do little more than make you wetter as you said. However, with the air turbulance generated while driving with the top down, the wind chill effect (just as relevant in summer as winter) aids evaporation and hence cooling, as you experienced on the speedboat. It's why they use the system combined with fans, rather than just spraying a mist on its own. It works well in the Florida amusement parks and it gets pretty humid there in the summer
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Interesting that the isn't any 'Jeep Wrangler - Problems and Solutions' discussion either.

    You should see the Ford F-Series one! :surprise:
  • tsjaytsjay Posts: 4,591
    Mac, I appreciate the suggestion about the mister, Mister. :)

    But, does anyone on the board know if the only source for cooling that a doggy has is through his tongue, and, if so, does that make the mister ineffective as a solution to the problem?

    Sunday, I wet RA's face from time to time with some of the water I carry for him. Also, gave him some ice from the cooler to chew on a few times.

    Leaving him home ain't an option. It would break his heart and mine too. You should see how excited he gets when I gather up the cooler and my camera in preparation to go wheelin'.

    I often play a little game at Ross Allen's expense before we go. My father in law is usually at our house for his breakfast when I leave to go wheelin'. He is a widower and lives right next door, so the wife includes him at breakfast time.

    I will have my stuff gathered up, and Ross Allen knows where I am going. I pretend that he isn't even there and ask my father in law if he wants to go Jeepin' with me. He says no, and I ask him if he knows someone who would like to go. I start suggesting different people and then stating why each one probably would not be able to go. The longer I carry this on this monologue, the more excited RA gets. He whimpers and whines and walks around in circles at my feet. Finally, he yelps and jumps up on me. That puppy sure loves wheelin'!

    Tomster

    Have you hugged your Jeep today?
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    My thinking was that although dogs cool down via their tongues, misting him down might keep him from getting overheated in the first place. In fact, in view of his coat, wetting him down from time to time might be better (and save the misting for yourself).

    Better to have a cool wet dog with you in the Jeep than a sad dry one at home. :shades:
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,110
    The longer I carry this on this monologue, the more excited RA gets.

    I think that's bordering on cruelty to animals! But then Ross Allen may already know he's going and gets a kick out of how you carry on for him so he just plays along. ;)

    tidester, host
  • tsjaytsjay Posts: 4,591
    Last year I picked up a little 12 volt fan that plugs into the cigarette lighter for Ross Allen. I mounted it to the back of the center console, so I could aim it at RA.

    The wires had to be spliced, and I don't have a good connection. I could fix that real easily, but I just didn't know how much help that fan would be. Maybe that in conjunction with wetting him down once in a while would help?

    Tomster

    Have you hugged your Jeep today?
  • jeff62301jeff62301 Posts: 310
    hey,, my animal science degree may come in useful!!

    yes,, panting is their main method of eliminating heat from their bodies,,, they have a few sweat glands on the pads of their feet but nothing compared to people .

    pigs don't sweat either, lots of hog houses are equipped with misters, and if you've ever been to the county fair and walked through the barns, you've probably seen people spraying their hogs with water. it takes heat to make the water evaporate, as the water evaporates, it takes heat with it, ( same as sweating does for us )

    I'm not sure that a dogs fur would allow the water to cool him down the way it will on a pig or a person

    jeff

    FYI Rabbits have large ears and dissipate heat by pumping more blood through the large surface area
  • embeedueceembeeduece Posts: 260
    They use these :lemon: over in the Buick discussion grroup.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    FYI Rabbits have large ears and dissipate heat by pumping more blood through the large surface area

    So what you're saying is that if the dog dresses in an Easter Bunny costume he can be kept cool by spraying his ears? Or, if he shaves his body to look like a pig the misting will definitely work? I'm beginning to think he might be better off at home after all. :blush:
  • jeff62301jeff62301 Posts: 310
    actually I think Tom is just using Ross Allen as an excuse to get the hard top back out and wheel in the Air Conditioned Comfort of Thelma J.

    jeff

    my top has been up the last several days and AC crank'n
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,206
    Lol, and I thought the Subaru post was a bit far afield. We have a invasion of feral Easter bunnies in my neighborhood and we can easily see over 40 by taking a morning or evening stroll.

    Ok, pardon this topical insert into the conversation:

    Spy Photos: 2007 Jeep Wrangler (Inside Line)

    Or maybe those aren't spy photos at all, but Randy and Tom's latest method for keeping bug juice off the paint?

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • embeedueceembeeduece Posts: 260
    Wow. That article got me psyched for the next Jeep. Thank god they're staying true to the roots (though the writer was a bit harsh on the Liberty crowd :P )

    I've always thought a nice ancillary benefit of Jeeps is that the designs are long lived, which is to say you don't have to trade in every other year to stay current and, dare I say, trendy.

    -Mike
  • erickplerickpl Posts: 2,735
    Yep, dog tongues are essentially it.

    With the slow crawl speeds at TB and the fact that with the trees you won't get much wind, a mist system on the roll bars or even under the lip of the rear of the tub that aims around the rear of the jeep, combined with you fixing that fan, would be a good combination for ol' RA. Since you never use your safari top, what about adapting that to cover the rear only for him as well? It would give him more shade as well.

    -Paul
  • randyacerandyace Posts: 96
    My wife was never the type to ask, "so...where have you been"??

    However, since Saturday, she HAS developed this little thing about asking, "so...what Jeep accessory site have you been into today?"

    ...was only a matter of time....!

    Randy
  • randyacerandyace Posts: 96
    One day, I'll start offering help here instead of pestering everyone with questions, but I am determined to get a cab cover for eXcalibur so I won't have to worry about opening/closing the top everytime I see a tiny cloud (remember...I'm "sick", as my lovely wife says...).

    This is a link for a cover on e-bay, which appears to be what I need, and reasonably priced. Think this will suffice, or go with the Mopar cover? I don't see any difference, other than the price.

    Tom: by the way, I have a shitzhu who thinks he should be the driver rather than the occupant. He's pretty hyper and gets too excited to drink as often as I think he should. However, most vets will agree that a dog will drink when his body tells him to. I, too, mist him down, but typically just make some stops and offer him water. If he just stares at me with that dumb look, I tell him, "well, if you go get dehydrated, don't blame me!". His tongue is constantly hanging out, cooling his system through the sweat glands in his tongue.

    Randy
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=42611&item=4554343370&rd- =1
  • erickplerickpl Posts: 2,735
    Personally, I'd only go with Bestop or the RainGear covers. They are waterproof, not just resistant. I have no first-hand experience with Smittybilt tops, so I can't really tell you if they are good at keeping water out or not.

    -Paul
  • normisnormis Posts: 9
    All -

    2 Questions:

    First, what do you use to clean your soft windows?

    Also, my wife took my baby ('05 unlimited) to the beach this weekend. Before she left, I cleaned the rear window with some windex and a paper towl, dried it off, rolled it up and secured it with the elastic straps. When she got to the beach, she unrolled and zipped up the window, which looked fine (the jeep was parked right next to the ocean). The next morning, she didn't clean the window, but rolled it up, secured it, and drove home. When I unrolled it, it looked "smudged" (I think scratched) all across the middle. Could this have been from not cleaning it prior to rolling it up again (salt air maybe)? Anyway, is there anything to do about the smudges/scratches?

    Thanks,

    Norm
  • keatskeats Posts: 412
    Paul is right, why gamble on a cover to save a few bucks? The advantage of the Mopar is that you can use it with a Bikini or the soft top in place. The advantage of the Rain Gear cover is that you can use it with the doors off. I love my Mopar one.
  • keatskeats Posts: 412
    NORM!

    I bet you still get that one a lot. The reason your windows are scratched is because you used a paper towel. Paper towels scratch plastic. You need a very soft towel. I use microfiber towels from Target. You can use some Pledge furniture polish on them to minimize the scratches and to clean them. Bikers use it all the time on their plastic windshields. Works great. You should also invest in a Window Roll or use a towel to roll the window up in.
  • jimlw2jimlw2 Posts: 122
    Hi Norm,

    First, avoid using Windex on any of your plastic windows. I read it somewhere (manual? this forum? the Wrangler video?)...window cleaners should not be used on the plastic windows. I think the ammonia in window cleaners may risk prematurely clouding your plastic windows. I think quadratec.com sells a cleaning solution especially for plastic windows...I suppose Mopar does, too. I need to look into that myself.

    I got the exact same blemish on my week-old '05 Unlimited rear softtop window after having it rolled up with the Sunrider open this past Sat. for a trip to my nephew's graduation party about 160 miles away via highway. I cleaned the rear window using warm water on a soft cloth wiping left to right before rolling it up and had those abrasion marks as you described. I think it's just from all the wind turbulence moving that rolled window around for a few hours. Clean plastic against clean plastic is still plastic against plastic. The lessoned I learned was I should have bought the Window Roll I've heard mentioned in this forum, removed the window entirely, and safely stowed it in one of those soft books of felt rather than leaving it rolled up for the trip.

    I hate having anything get blemished on our new Wranglers, especially when they're only weeks old. We can read all the information supplied by the good members of this forum but I'm sure we're still likely to learn some of these things the "hard" way on our own.

    I don't want our new Jeeps to get damaged at all. However, even as things get "dirty" or "dinged" on our Jeeps, I'm amazed yet again at the experience I'm receiving owning a Wrangler. I've never owned a vehicle where I could see anything positive about "blemishes" but here again, the Wrangler astounds me! These "blemishes" seem to simply add individual character. Blemishes like these on regular vehicles really are "black eyes" but not the Wrangler...blemishes are showing Wrangler "attitude" and "experience." Again, please don't get me wrong, I'd love to see them not get any cosmetic scrapes or bruises but it does seem the Wrangler wears them well.

    Good luck,

    Jim
  • wheelsdownwheelsdown Posts: 250
    I have the Bestop cover that looks like the one shown. Keep it in a small sports bag I got at a garage sale. Toss it in the back when I have the top down or off. I have only the soft top, but I take it off a lot. With it off, I need something I can use to cover the TJ when I will be away from it for a while. If the top is just down, I sometime just flop it up if I leave it. I have learned never to trust the weather. I have done the drive home with a couple of inches of water sloshing around in the front thing. Bad sinking feeling when you find it. It is amazing how well it dries out, seats and all.

    Terry
  • jimlw2jimlw2 Posts: 122
    Hi Keats - Are those microfiber towels at Target a disposable towel or are they a cloth towel you wash when dirty? Are they in Target's automotive aisles?

    Thanks - Jim
  • erickplerickpl Posts: 2,735
    When washing the jeep, soap and water works well. Microfiber towels or a clean chamois work well to dry.

    When storing, clean them first!

    If you want to clean the windows, you can also go with convertible window cleaner. BMW sells some, you could use Pledge, but that will attract dust to it. I think Maguire's makes some kind of cleaner too for plastic windows. Windex and Glass Plus and those type of cleaners will indeed fog your windows much faster!

    If you go to the beach, I wouldn't roll the window up when you're leaving. The sand will tear it up bad if you roll it, as I'm sure you found out. If nothing else, lay them down in the back with a towel between them to help, but don't roll them or squeeze them together tightly.

    -Paul
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