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Jeep Wrangler

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Comments

  • goducks1goducks1 Posts: 432
    seriously? They calibrate the speedometer incorrectly from the factory? So went I went from the stock 215s to my current 30" tires, I'm probably closer to an accurate speedometer now? If this affect the odometers too, wouldn't that be illegal, showing incorrect mileage?

    Your mileage will be "bad" with a Jeep. End of story. If you get 20mpg out of a tank on occasion, you'll be doing a jig by the pump.
  • goducks1goducks1 Posts: 432
    It's not because you're a girl, I'm a guy who knew exactly what the problem was and was also quoted b/w $700-$1000 for this repair by various shops, generally split equally parts/labor. I got it fixed for a little over $300 this summer and it's been running fine ever since. See post #19086 here--I bought the replacement on ebay for about$150(I don't know anything about Mac's source, but the 1aautomotive people sell a good part with a lifetime guarantee) and had it installed by a local tuner-type kid for $160 in his own garage. He was happy, I was happy, everyone was happy except the muffler shops.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    seriously? They calibrate the speedometer incorrectly from the factory?.........If this affect the odometers too, wouldn't that be illegal, showing incorrect mileage?

    Yes, seriously! It affects the odometer as well, but I don't know what the legal situation is. I'd guess that a certain percentage of latitude is allowed, probably to take into account that the rolling radius of tires that are nominally the same size can often differ.

    For the vehicle manufacturer, to have the speedometer reading fast is a win/win situation. It keeps the customer happy as the vehicle appears to be going faster than it really is, and it also appears to be achieving a better gas mileage than is actually the case.

    The manufacturer also benefits from have having the warranty mileage expire early. Not much on each vehicle, but spread over the total number of vehicles produced it becomes a substantial saving. A secondary benefit of having it read high is that the manufacturer can't be sued by customers who unwittingly qualified for speeding tickets!
  • greddengredden Posts: 30
    Thanks to everyone for the info. I have heard that the Good Year MT have very thick side walls, may want to check into that.
  • keatskeats Posts: 412
    Good Year MTRs, and yes, they have 3 ply sidewalls, which are very tough, which is why they're on the Rubicon. I have also read how they're not great on the snow, or wet street, but I haven't experienced it. I think they're great, and will most likely buy another set after mine wear out.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Yes, MT/Rs are one tough tire. I have them as standard fitment in a 37 x 12.5 on my other vehicle. I've never used them in thick snow or ice, but can vouch for them on most other surfaces including wet pavement.
  • ghuletghulet Posts: 2,628
    Sorry for the double post, but I'm in a bind. My '01 Sport 4.0 manual is stuck at the supermarket because the ignition will not turn, with either the spare key I started with OR the 'original' key. I tried every trick (pushed the ignition lock lever, which hasn't functioned correctly in a year or two, in and out, pushed the clutch all the way in, changed gears, wiggled the now locked steering column, even pushed the vehicle itself to see if it would 'work its way out') to no avail. Now not only am I likely to have to pay fairly big bucks to have it fixed (out of warranty, of course), but I have to summon a tow truck (naturally, we're getting a blizzard as we speak, so the tow should take forever and cost a small fortune as well). Anyone else experience this? I have in the past on other (very old) vehicles, but not on a four-and-a-half year-old car with 55k, this is ridiculous. Must admit, it's the first time it's stranded me, though. Anyone know what this might be and how much it'll cost? Any suggestions or things I'm missing?
  • rp05rp05 Posts: 20
    Greetings,

    I purchased some diamond plate rocker covers off a unlimited rubicon. I want to install them on my non rubicon unlimited. Here are my questions,

    It looks like I have to drill holes in the body to mount the covers there, are there any tips out there on drilling into the body? I have ordered the 6 bolts for each side but was wondering, on the underside are the bolts already there that are used for mounting or do I have to drill holes and purchase bolts as well? I also have factory running boards installed, will they have to be removed permantly? Thanks for the help.

    Here's my $.02 on the BFG M/T I just traded my BFG A/T for the M/T and couldn't be happier rain,slush,mud, they are awesome.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I hope you got home ok. Hopefully it will just be a faulty lock/switch. It may even be the lock barrel which is independently replaceable. However, if it's a fault in any part of the mechanism that's a part of the column itself, then it becomes a bigger problem as the column has to be replaced.

    I have to say that complaining that your Jeep broke down after four and a half years and 55K seems a little harsh, Especially as it let you know for the last year or two that it had a problem. ;)

    Anyhow, good luck, it's no fun being stranded! :sick:
  • keatskeats Posts: 412
    After you make your initial punch for the drill, I'd cover each spot with masking tape to prevent the paint from flaking off while you're drilling. I'd also use some silicone or paint to coat the holes before putting the screws in.

    Have you thought about using a gasket between the rocker and the body? I'm not sure about the underside, but the factory steps should still fit fine.

    BTW, don't count on the rocker guards to provide much protection. They're a lot better than nothing, but they're by no means hard core.
  • rp05rp05 Posts: 20
    Thanks keats,

    The rockers came with the gaskets. Thanks for the drilling tips. Still looking for advice on the underside.

    rp
  • wpowellwpowell Posts: 125
    As most of you probably know, the front and rear lockers in a Rubicon will only function in 4L. It would be very helpful for me to have the work in 4H because I do some sand hills, etc. and would benefit from more tire speed than I can get with the ultra-low 4L gearing in the Rubicon t-case. The new JP magazine describes how to ground one of the wires behind the locker switch to "trick" the lockers into working in either 2H or 4H. Any potential mechanical or warranty issues I should be aware of before making this simple mod? Thanks!

    Mark
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    That restriction was made more for liability reasons than anything else. Mechanical damage is unlikely unless you go too fast, but do remember that steering is more limited with the front locked.

    Warranty issues with the drivetrain are likely if the dealer knows what you've done.
  • keatskeats Posts: 412
    Mark, I know several folks on another forum that have done this with no ill effects.
  • wpowellwpowell Posts: 125
    Thanks Mac and Keats for the feedback, I'm going to make the mod. If I need to have any warranty work done I can easily reverse/remove the wiring change. I understand the DCJ logic of trying to avoid having drivers lock the diff's in a high traction situation which could lead to drivetrain disaster or worse. But, there are many offroad situations where wheel speed is critical, and the Rubicon's combination of 4:1 t-case, 4.11 gearing and 31" tires make it impossible to get those babies turing very fast in 4L. With that said, I'm sure that if fast spinning wheels on locked diff's suddening grabbed something solid they could explode a drivetrain. Thanks again!

    Mark
  • Tom,

    That is a great picture. It's nice to know that other people truly care!

    -Rob (fellow dog lover)
  • tsjaytsjay Posts: 4,591
    Rob:

    The "real thing" got put in the mail this AM. It's coming all the way from Australia, so it will be a few days in getting here, I guess.

    I know I will cherish that portrait as long as I live.

    You gonna make the big gathering at Turkey Bay the weekend of February 18th and 19th?

    Tom
    Have you hugged your Jeep today?
  • Tom,

    I don't know if I can make it or not. Typically, we are busy from now until spring and there is mandatory OT, but layoffs were just announced so I don't know what is going to happen. Hopefully, I'll get to go.

    -Rob
  • nausetnauset Posts: 2
    Mac24,

    I need to replace my exhaust manifold on my '97 Wrangler Sport. I've had no problem finding one online, but I am having a problem finding a mechanic who will quote me on what the install will cost. What should this labor/install cost? Can you suggest how I find a mechanic willing to do this? Any mechanics you know of that will do this in/around the Boston, MA area? Thanks!

    -Nauset
  • tsjaytsjay Posts: 4,591
    Hi Nauset, and welcome to Edmunds Jeep Wrangler.

    I know you directed your question to Mac, but he must be away from the computer for a while. He always answers questions for folks.

    I wish you luck in finding someone to do the work for you. Remember, the lowest price is not always the best deal. Find someone with a good reputation, someone who is known to stand behind his work.

    Tom
    Have you hugged your Jeep today?
  • goducks1goducks1 Posts: 432
    Nauset, you will get quoted between $300-$400 in labor from most shops. Mechanically, it's not an especially difficult task, just labor-intensive because you need to remove the serpentine, pull the power steering pump out of the way, and unbolt the air intake and old manifold (they use the same bolts as I am sure you've noticed). Put the new manifold on and then reverse the steps. I am not as mechanically adept as Mac, my expertise is pretty much limited to basic maintainence, but I could have done it with help I am sure though it would have taken awhile. There's a great step-by-step somewhere online with pics but I can't find it right now. Instead, I put up an ad on Craigslist's "services" section. Got multiple replies and found a guy who worked out of his garage near here and had done it on his wife's Grand Cherokee already. He did an outstanding job for $160 which was well worth the money.

    The danger of someone doing it in their garage is if one of the studs breaks in the engine block. Didn't happen to me, but it is possible.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    I'm not surprised that mechanics don't want to quote you a fixed cost - I understand the bolts can be a really difficult, so they don't always know how long it will take them (depends on how many break). When I got it replaced on my '98 Sport, I was quoted around $1000 by several people, and ended up getting a reputable (suggested by several garages that didn't do manifolds) garage to do it for $800, parts included (he bought the Mopar replacement one).
  • nausetnauset Posts: 2
    Thanks guys. I found one mechanic so far that quoted me $300 for the labor (I supply the part), which sounds very reasonable. His shop specializes in off-road cars/trucks, so I think he should be good. I found that link online for the step-by-step, but I don't have the tools or the time unfortunately. Here it is though for anyone looking: http://www.jeepingsingles.net/tech/manifold_p.asp
    Thanks again.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I'd estimate around four hours labor, so $300 doesn't sound unreasonable. As mentioned earlier it's not a technically difficult job, so if the shop is competent you shouldn't have any problems.

    I know it must seem like I'm here 24/7, but I do get a little time off occasionally for good behavior! :shades:
  • gman1259gman1259 Posts: 209
    "I have also read how they're not great on the snow."

    I hope this is not true...I purchased a set of five for Elliemae because I am building a home in the mountains. It will suck if I put these tires on just to learn they cannot handle the snow. :(
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    It will suck if I put these tires on just to learn they cannot handle the snow.

    I'm sure you'll report back on your experience, but I doubt that you'll be unhappy. I haven't personally used MT/Rs on snow but I've heard great reports of them on other vehicles.

    Don't forget that snow, like sand, comes in many different types. Sometimes you'll need low tire pressure to try to spread the load and float on top, other times you'll need to punch through for better grip.
  • goducks1goducks1 Posts: 432
    Yes, that's the link. If you are buying the manifold from 1aautomotive I can vouch that mine has held up just fine for the past 6 months. Way quieter too, plus noticable increases in HP and MPG. One nice thing for whoever does this is the ton of room in the Wrangler engine bay. Friend of mine was over here this weekend with his new Mini S. Nice little car but I cannot imagine ever working on it. It's a miracle they could fit a supercharger under that hood.
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,281
    Don't forget about the Jeep Wrangler: Problems and Solutions discussion (someone needs some tips in there if you get my drift ;) )

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I didn't even know that forum existed! :confuse:

    I've made a couple of posts, but if it's used correctly it will probably halve the number of posts here (or is that the idea?).
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,281
    Well, there are a lot of posts in here but the search tool works pretty good. I think some members just wanted a more focused discussion and that's fine too. One more discussion to track shouldn't be too much of a hardship for a 24/7 guy like you Mac! :shades:

    Steve, Host

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

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