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Isuzu Trooper

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Comments

  • I was behind a 92-93 Trooper at a gas station last month. The driver asked me what year mine was and then told me that his truck had 250k+ and still running great. I'd be happy to reach 200k. :)
  • breakorbreakor Posts: 398
    My suggestions are to only use the plugs noted in the owners manual (i.e. don't use Bosch Plus4s). Depending on where you live, the only readily available plugs may be Champions. FWIW that is what mine came with and what I used for the replacement.

    I think both the plugs mentioned in the manual come prelubed with an anti-sieze coating. Therefore go easy with any additional compound.

    I also put some dielectric compound on the top of the plug.
  • breakorbreakor Posts: 398
    What is the OEM oil filter bypass pressure specification? And how did you find this information?

    The reason I ask is that the spec Purolator filter is 12-15psi, the spec WIX is 8-11psi, and the Champion spec is 11-17psi. I called Filtech, the company who makes the filter for Isuzu, and they wouldn't give me the time of day.
  • raydahsraydahs Posts: 449
    Never pull the plugs from aluminum heads while it's warm, you'll pull the threads with it. Use a piece of vacuum line or gas line cut it to @12" long, slide it over the tip and feed it into the hole, once it's down on the thread, turn until it stops. this will give you more feel while starting it into the hole, avoiding cross-threading, then tighten with the wrench:)
  • jrr2kjrr2k Posts: 35
    Nice results cknott...
    The 02 trooperchabra needs its first oil change. I hope to start a long and healthy maintanance history. Any comments or suggestions on oil brands, weights? Filter brands, #s?
    I drive 95% on road (communting), drive in the mountains on road trips, and put 20000 miles a year on my vehicles. I live in the Pacific NW (mild winters, mild summers). If that is a factor. Your comments are welcome.

    Interesting results on the oil cooler. They seem like an inexpensive part and a worthwhile modification. What cooler did you buy? Where did you mount it? How easy was it to install?
  • cknottcknott Posts: 61
    Breakor,

    Perhaps I should clarify. I do not have the book or specs in front of me to reference. I chose the filter using the following method. I initially looked up the standard filter by looking up the filter call out for a 1999 Isuzu Trooper using the Purolator reference book. I then went to the back of the book to evaluate the specifications for that particular oil filter. I needed to maintain the M20x1.5 oil filter threads and the antidrain back valve. I chose to keep the pressure relief settings the same as the standard filter. By looking at the back of the reference book, I then pulled every filter off the shelf that had M20x1.5 threads, an antidrain back valve, and the same pressure relief settings. I then pulled each oil filter out of the box and looked at it. The PL14619 oil filter was the largest oil filter I could find that would have a seal small enough to fit comfortably on the stock flange. I have not investigated other brands nor did I know that there was pressure relief variation from one filter manufacturer to the next for the same filter application. Based on the specs you provided, I don't believe the variation from one manufacturer to the next is significant, IMHO.

    Breakor, why did you ask Filtech for the time of day? why didn't you just ask them for the pressure relief specs?....just playing

    I purchased a Derale engine oil cooler, P/N 15502. You can see them at www.derale.com. Summit car racing had the best price by far. DO NOT use the filters recommended on their(Derale) instruction sheet, they will leak! This was one of the reasons I investigated a larger oil filter. However, I have been happy with the cooler. I mounted it and an external transmission cooler in the air flow area below the front bumper between the fog lights. I made some brackets and used zip ties to hold it in place.

    Chad
  • http://www.pureoil.com/

    This is the Purolator oil filter web page. There are three ways to cross reference: 1.) find your vehicle, 2.) cross reference, 3.) find vehicles that fit a Purolator part number. Unfortunately the physical properties section in the big book in the autoparts store that contains the thread sizes and relief settings, find online, I did not.

    ..

    What is the diameter of PL14619 filter? BTW the PL14619 fits AMC, Dodge Jeep, Pugeot, Renault.
  • sdc2sdc2 Posts: 780
    The Trooper is possibly the easiest engine to change plugs on that I have ever encountered.

    You will need to unplug the connector for the wires to the coil pack. The coil pack is integral with the 6" or so of plug "wire" underneath.

    All you need for 5 out of 6 plugs is a standard long extension with the plug socket and wrench.

    The drivers side rear plug is a little more tricky due to the proximity of the master cylinder. I was able to get it out by feeding in two short extensions, one at a time, plus a u-joint extension and a long extension to get clearance for the wrench to swing.

    I recommend a torque wrench for final tightening. You definitely do not want to overtighten plugs in an aluminum block.
  • breakorbreakor Posts: 398
    Cknott thanks for the extra info.

    If anybody else is interested in going with a larger filter in the stock location, I have found 2 other filters that look like they should work. The Purolator 24458 with a bypass pressure setting of 8-10psi (vs. 12-15psi for the stock 14459 filter). Several people have reported using this one. Or, the WIX 51344 which has the same pressure relief setting (8-11psi) as the stock 51334. WARNING: I am still going through my stash of Filtech filters so I have not tried either of these filters. Therefore before using either of these larger filters do your own checking to make sure they will indeed work.
  • http://www.pureoil.com/

    This is the Purolator oil filter web page. There are three ways to cross reference: 1.) find your vehicle, 2.) cross reference, 3.) find vehicles that fit a Purolator part number. Unfortunately the physical properties section in the big book in the autoparts store that contains the thread sizes and relief settings, find online, I did not.

    ..

    What is the diameter of PL14619 filter? BTW the PL14619 fits AMC, Dodge Jeep, Pugeot, Renault.
  • cknott, doesn't the Trooper have a stock transmission cooler? Did you mount a second one, or did yours not have one? I thought they did...
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    They have tranny coolers built into the radiator. I've been thinking of adding an extra one, but haven't decided yet.

    -mike
  • cknottcknott Posts: 61
    I do not have the PL14619 oil filter in front of me, but it has a larger diameter and length than the stock filter. It will hold nearly one quart of oil. The filter is sort-of deceiving when you look at the box, because you think it will never fit because the diameter is so large. However, when you physically look at the filter, you will see that the seal diameter is about an inch or so smaller than the diameter of the filter.

    Yes, troopers do have an internal cooler in the radiator. However, that cooler is simply a piece of pipe passing through the bottom tank of the radiator. I was talking to my local Isuzu dealer mechanic about this issue. He "told" me that it is standard protocol for them to install an external tranny cooler when someone comes in for a tranny repair under warranty. He claimed that the cooler, as currently designed, is designed to quickly heat up the fluid and then stabilize the temperature of the fluid under most driving conditions. However, he indicated that the stock cooler lines do very little to maintain the temperature of the fluid under towing conditions/high temperature conditions. For me, his comments were only additonal information. My father and I have always had GM trucks and suburbans with external engine oil and transmission oil coolers, from the factory. These trucks easily achieve over 200,000 miles without powertrain problems. So I spent $150 to get coolers similar to what I can get on a GM truck and it gives me piece of mind.

    Chad
  • Sounds like a plan, but does it defeat the purpose of the standard tranny cooler?
  • sdc2sdc2 Posts: 780
    The only problem it could cause is if it didn't allow the fluid to warm up enough. This could only be a problem in VERY cold weather, so it depends where you live. I live in Minnesota, so I routed the hoses to the cooler first, then through the radiator, so the fluid warming function would not be affected, but the cooler can still dump a lot of heat in warm weather.

    In warmer climes I would do it the other way around, as the manufacturer suggests (radiator first, then cooler).
  • sdc2sdc2 Posts: 780
    This is from the Hayden Automotive website FAQ, relative to my previous post:

    Q. Should the cooler be installed before or after the radiator?
    A. Hayden recommends installing the auxiliary cooler after the radiator to return the coolest fluid directly to the transmission. Installing the cooler before the radiator will still provide additional cooling and may be necessary in some difficult access applications.


    Q. Can you over cool the transmission fluid?
    A. Transmissions are not highly sensitive to cool operating temperatures. However, in sub-zero (20-30° F) weather conditions transmission fluid can actually gel up in an external cooler and cease to flow, causing damage. Use of the radiator cooler actually helps warm the fluid under these conditions. It is critical in extreme cold conditions to use the original equipment cooler in series with the auxiliary cooler and allow the vehicle to warm up before driving.

    ***

    After reading this, I believe I made the right call on the routing.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I did it opposite on my SVX cause I know I won't be taking it up to the Adirondack Mts upstate in the winter, only the summer, and wanted the coolest ATF fluid flowing to the tranny. On the Trooper I'm not sure which way I'll go, I may go the same as Steve or not, if I even do it.

    -mike
  • What tranny cooler has been used in the Trooper and who was the source? Is installation a big deal or should most shade tree mechanics be able to handle this task? Is there pitfalls to avoid, etc. etc. etc. Thanks for the help.
    Philip
  • sbcookesbcooke Posts: 2,297
    Why even use one at all? If already designed for towing up to a certain amount, I don't understand the push to increase capacity? You cannot increase the load due to brakes, driveline, engine, etc.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I think the idea is to prevent overheating the tranny. The manufacturer has a cost-benefit analysis when he decides how big a cooler to install etc. This cost-benefit may be different than your personal needs. Similar to OEM tires :)

    -mike
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