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Isuzu Trooper

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Comments

  • bsmart1bsmart1 Posts: 377
    Tom, any update on the oil consumption?
  • serranotserranot Posts: 113
    Well, I'm at 906 miles since the oil change and have h=used just a tad over 1/2 quart. That would equate to roughly 1 qt/1600 miles. My previous several uses were averaging a quart per 800 miles, so this is roughly twice as good.

    The real test will be the short road trip I am taking soon, and pulling a trailer. That is when this thing has historically used oil at a prodigious rate. I'll report back after that.

    I'm hopeful that this is a good sign. I can live with a qt/1600 miles. It has used a quart/2000 miles average since I got it new.

    My latest problem has been lots of pinging under normal driving. I did buy gas from a fly-by-night place, so I will try another tankful of something quality. If that does not work, I will look into a decarbonizing product.

    Regards,
    Tom
  • serranotserranot Posts: 113
    As an addendum to my previous post, I took a few minutes to decarbonize the engine using the water method. I used a length of clear tubing and a restrictor cone that came with my Mityvac brake bleeder/vacuum pump. I disconnected the PCV hose from the valve, stuck the tubing into the hose (it fit perfectly), and then ran the engine up to about 2300 RPM and stuck the restrictor into a vase filled with water. I ran that through until the vase was empty. We'll see if that did the trick. Note that depending on the size of the restrictor, the engine will suck all the water out in about 10 seconds flat! After I saw the rate at which the water was being sucked, I just held the hose above the water and metered it a bit slower.

    Anyway, I'll report back on this as well.

    Regards,
    Tom
  • bsmart1bsmart1 Posts: 377
    Tom, I thought ISUZU had a anti-knock sensor that would adjust the timing to prevent 'pinging' by adjusting the timing thru the CPU. Does that not really work?
  • bsmart1bsmart1 Posts: 377
    WOW.......thats all I can say about the improvement in the ride of my 99' Trooper since I put these springs on the rear. The ride is significantly improved!! I'm trying to decide what to do with the front end now to raise it to match the rear. I've cranked the torsion bars about as far as they will go without starting over with them. Is there a best way to get more lift in the front, by un-springing them and starting from scratch. Any gotcha's to avoid??

    I'm continuing to adjust to the new ride in the 01' with the new OME shocks all around. It doesn't ride nearly as 'softly' as the 99' with the new OME springs and 4 year old Rancho shocks with 0-5 adjustment ability. Its super smooth, although a little 'mushy' feeling at times. I'm still playing with which settings give the best overall feel of the road, combined with smooth/soft comfort. These Ranchos still seem to perform quite well, and respond appropriately when adjusted to a new setting.
  • Our 2001 Isuzu Trooper 3.5 4x4 automatic transmission is going out. The dealer quoted $5000.00 to repair/replace. Local transmission shops do not have great reputations. Any recommendations as to who we could use for the replacement or is the dealer the only way to go? We are located in California Central Valley.
  • serranotserranot Posts: 113
    I don't know if any of the Trooper engines had this sensor. If they do, my guess is that enough carbon buildup will create hot spots that even the knock sensor cannot "fix." I note that my engine did not knock even a little bit, and I was towing a moderate load in 90 degree weather on Saturday. It really was a miracle cure for the knocking.

    Unfortunately, the oil burning was the same. I drove about 350 miles towing a 6x12 trailer with a bunch of stuff in it. The thing used about a quart of oil, maybe a little less. It's clear that when you load it up and/or do extended freeway driving, it loves to sip oil. But so long as I check it, it's runs just fine. It just annoys the hell out of me.

    Regards,
    Tom
  • wlbrown9wlbrown9 Posts: 836
    Are you out of warranty on the transmission? If you are original owner powertrain warranty should be 10 years, 120,000 miles. Of course if you are not the original owner, I think it dropped to 60K miles, not sure if it is 3 or 5 years...isuzu.com does not cover that.
  • We are not the original owner and Yes we are out of warranty. This is my wifes car and I can work on it... but am considering the dealer or other reputable transmission repair shop before I start looking into doing the repair myself.
    Thank you for the question and reply.
  • boxtrooperboxtrooper Posts: 843
    IF it were me, I'd be looking for either a transmission from a junk yard, or a whole used Trooper with some other issues for a much lower price than $5000.
    ..
    A million years ago, I dented the front of my mom's 1965 Impala and someone at night broke out a rear window. I found another Impala at a used car lot. I talked to the guy and asked if I could just buy the parts I wanted from that used car. He was all for it. I just harvested the parts right on the lot and paid what I considered a low price for all.
    ..
    I drive only manual transmission Troopers, no problems, but no TOD either.
  • bsmart1bsmart1 Posts: 377
    What are your symptoms that the transmission is going??? I would like to know what to look for since I have 2 Troopers with Automatic. Was it sudden, or is it a gradual failure?

    I've had to replace the starter on my 99' Troop and I think I can recognize when the problem will occur on my 01' I noticed a different sound when starting the vehicle several times before the starter completely quit. It was at about 89000 miles when it gave out. This seems to be about a typical life expectency for starters on Troopers.
  • bsmart1bsmart1 Posts: 377
    Tom, you're right on target with the oil consumption under 'loaded' conditions. In short trips my oil consumption is pretty much zero, but when I take the 99' on a 'road trip' it gets a little thirsty for oil. It isn't bad, but it does increase.

    I put Sea Foam in the crankcase of both Troopers a few weeks ago, and it seems to be making a small difference in the 01' model. We've made a couple of 500 mile trips since putting the SF in, and there's no indication of oil use at this point!! We'll see if this holds up.
  • boxtrooperboxtrooper Posts: 843
    Starter at 89000 miles is suspiciously close to the life of the typical car battery. If the voltage is too low the starter will be working much longer and at worst case voltage conditions.
    ..
    Maybe change your battery sooner and not lose the starter.
    ..
    While on the battery topic, consider using an AGM battery, their internal resistance is 1/10 that of a regular wet cell battery, so at a given starting current, the voltage drop will be much less, so your starter gets more voltage and starts quicker under more ideal conditions. Also, the AGMs don't leak or vent corrosive gas so your battery terminals stay shiny new and do not contribute to lower cranking voltage.
    ..
    I believe that the GRP31 battery is the largest that will fit, good for winches etc..
    http://www.lifelinebatteries.com/rvbatterysize.php
    ..
    I have also used the Optima brand in a smaller size that needs a spacer for the Trooper battery clamp to hold it sucure.
    http://www.optimabatteries.com/publish/optima/americas0/en/config/product_info/automotive.html
  • serranotserranot Posts: 113
    Note that the Optima batteries now come with a removable spacer. It gives the battery the perfect height. I was using a block of wood prior to the time when I got ahold of the spacer.

    Regards,
    Tom
  • isuzufanisuzufan Posts: 2
    Back in July '01 someone had a tranny problem that sounded very much like the problem I'm having with a 93 Trooper I just bought. Consistent symptoms: if put in Drive after starting, it is sluggish (as if it is in a high gear) and won't change gears. If put in 1st after starting, it will not change out of 1st even when the shifter is put into 2nd...UNTIL the check trans light flashes. Then it will manually shift (with hard shifts) but will not go into Drive (stays in 3rd). I assume that "Drive" is actually "overdrive" on the 3rd gear. The problem starts over fresh every time the engine is turned off: the check trans light is off until I've run the rpms in 1st up over 4500. I didn't check the speed the last time I drove it, but at 4500 rpm in 1st I'm probably in that 21 mph range.

    The reply by paisan in '01 suggested the winter switch was intermittently activating, as the problem was not consistent. However, someone else suggested it was the transmission control module. There was very little in the way of follow-up on the discussion, so I'm asking for some help here now.

    I do not know where the trans control module is located, nor do I know much about these kinds of things. It seems that the TCM is part of the computer system. However, it could be a sensor kind of thing. So how do I find it, so that I can either have it tested or replace it?

    How would I disconnect the winter switch (which seems like a redundant system when you have 2WD-4WD capability)?

    The transmission shop refused to work on this car, as they said the wiring harness was bad ("wires pulled, broken, the plug on the transmission destroyed...a butcher job") but I visually inspected all the wiring and found no such condition. I think they just don't want to get into a '93 rewiring job and have to give a warranty. Thoughts, all you Trooper experts out there?

    By the way, I bought Isuzu because 11 years ago when I remarried an '87 Isuzu pup came with the ring...and you couldn't shoot the thing and kill it. It gave us 25+ mpg when the head was so warped it burned up a gallon of antifreeze every tankful.
  • atfdmikeatfdmike Posts: 414
    I can't imagine that the transmission was behaving this way and you still bought it, but in any event, it sounds like you will have to address the problems in some kind of logical order. IMO, if the Mode switch which is down on the transmission selection lever is bad, miswired, corroded, etc;, then you have to start there and see if that is the problem. The mode switch is often mentioned first with most trans problems. the TCM would be my last suspect until you know that the mode switch and power and winter switchs are OK. Really, you will need a manual or service info to nail down what is happening. The winter switch simply puts the trans in third so there is less slippage in icy conditions. Does the winter light illuminate when you press the button? There are usually directions on visor for this option when equipped.
    I would suggest the mode switch first, then other options. Truprs are known for electrical gremlins, so checking the connectors and cleaning connections are a good place to start as well. One guys opinion
  • isuzufanisuzufan Posts: 2
    Yes, the price of the vehicle and the terrific condition it was in otherwise convinced us we were money ahead even if we had to rebuild the tranny and put a new wiring harness in.

    However, I fixed the problem, and it wasn't the mode or winter switches...this time. I simply need better glasses.

    I put the vehicle up on a platform so I would have better working room, which also put the wiring harness/transmission into my good-vision-without-glasses range. Using a mirror on an extendable arm, I found that the two wires for the plug at the top of the trans (right under the shifter on the console) had been spliced improperly. I also found another wire, on another plug to the driver's side of the transmission (the 4-pin one).

    For others who might have this same problem, here's what I did:

    I don't know the names of the parts, so I'll try my best to describe them. I disconnected the shifter by taking out a cotter key on the end of the flat rod that went from the shifter to a round rod. (The round rod is connected to a flat rod that is connected to the shift mechanism in the trans. I simply disconnected that part which I knew would not alter the gear locations in the process.) After removing the key, I simply laid the rod end down (it rested on the muffler, if I recall correctly), and then took apart the console. The only caution I have about doing this is to be very careful with the positioning of the screws on the cable that leads from the shifter to the ignition. These got changed when I re-installed them, and I had to make several adjustments in order to get the key out of the ignition switch.

    Using electronics cleaner spray, I cleaned the exposed wires, trimmed them and twisted the strands. I added dialectric grease, and used electrical connectors, the kind that you put on the end of the wire and crimp down, to reconnect them. In this way, I had a good electrical connection, free of grease and oil, and protected from future invasion of water, etc. The spray, connectors, and grease were not expensive. In fact, the spare change I found when I took the console apart paid for about half of the cost! My husband found that rather amusing.

    In putting the console back together, I had my husband work the brake pedal as I reinstalled the knob (and the release button) on the top of the shifter. The pedal needs to be depressed in order for the release button to sit properly when you align the screw holes at the bottom of the knob.

    There are other botched splices in other areas, and I will address them shortly. Fortunately, all are fairly accessible. The blue plug behind the left headlight has several bad splices, and there are two wires leading the the fuel injector that need work, but right now the vehicle purrs.

    So, atfdmike, thanks for the encouragement to retrace the wiring again, even though I never opened the mode switch assembly. I appreciate knowing that elsewhere on this forum are instructions for doing so, if I ever need to and desire to get my achy, aging body back underneath again. In the meantime, I am serious money ahead.

    Apologies to the AAMCO guy, but his description of the wiring harness was grossly overstated, as was his estimate of repair costs.
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,110
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  • My wife drives 80 miles a day in her 01 trooper. One day she noticed surging and hesitation (It was in December). We took it to the dealership they told us 5000.00 to fix... we parked it trying to decide what we wanted to do. It is currently at AAmco with a 3800.00 price for the fix. She loves the troopers... I drive her old 89 trooper and have a 98 Chevy truck. I work on all the vehicles... but the time/energy to work on the 01 transmission just wasn't there. By the way.... We looked for transmission they were hard to find and the few we did find had high price tags on them as well.
  • I have the same problem for my 2000 Trooper. I do oil change every 3000 miles. But around 70K miles, I found the engine consume oil. Now I have to pour a quarter oil around 1500 miles between oil change. :sick:
  • bsmart1bsmart1 Posts: 377
    I was reading another website forum on Troopers that stated that engines using oil was due to worn valve guides in the engine. It was stated that this was a known weakness in some ISUZU engines b/c of the soft materials used???
  • serranotserranot Posts: 113
    That may be the case for some, but I am unconvinced that it is the whole issue. Usually, the worn valve guide would show up as a lot of blue smoke on startup because of the oil that would leak into the combustion chambers after shutdown, etc. I really don't get that at all.

    I guess it's possible, though. I have never priced valve guides nor looked at the work needed to install them.

    Regards,
    Tom
  • bsmart1bsmart1 Posts: 377
    I replaced my air filters on both Troopers several years ago with K&N filters. I was reading the K&N website that the filters don't require re-generating for about 40,000 miles typically.
    Well, it was about that time this weekend, so I pulled them out and took a good look at their conditions. Yep, they were loaded with debris and pretty blackened with dirt. I got my re-gen kit out and read the directions on it, followed them to the T, and tada....filters look as good as new!! The only downside is, you better not need the vehicle for a couple of hours. You gotta pull the filter, wash it out with a detergent, let it air dry, and then re-coat it with a new oil film that K&N provides. Process takes a couple of hours on a hot humid day.
    Troops breathing freely again..........
  • tkevinblanctkevinblanc Posts: 356
    atfdmike:

    I finally got back to my Trooper blower motor problem, but I'm at a loss.

    First, I know the new motor I purchased works. I hooked it up to a 12V power supply and it runs hard.

    Second, I took the dashboard apart enough to get to the blower motor switch and did continuity tests across the switch. It appears to work fine.

    My problem now is I can't figure out where the gang of resistors that control the blower motor speed is. It's not near the switch. All the wires are ganged together in a plug that connects it to a wiring harness that disappears deep in the dash. I have no idea where it goes.

    You wouldn't happen to know whether this resistor set is an independent piece, or where it is, would you? I know that bringing this to the dealer is going to be an incredibly expensive exercise, but I'm sort of at a loss now. Any help would be appreciated.
  • atfdmikeatfdmike Posts: 414
    I don't know offhand where it is located, but tracing the wire harness back should lead you there. Did you check for 12 V at the switch? It is one thing for the switch to work, but for troubleshooting, you may need to know which way the power is routed. Usually the resistors are located somewhere on the HVAC unit where they will get some airflow to cool them. I will check my manuals tonite and see if there is anything more specific. Meanwhile, maybe someone else can answer?
  • isuzufan1isuzufan1 Posts: 1
    I have a 1990 Trooper with 266,635 miles on it. It has been running perfectly, suddenly it won't turn over. My mechanic THINKS it has blown valves or head gasket. However, there have been no symptoms of this whatsoever. It was running perfectly, does anyone else have any experience with this. My decision is whether to do a valve job, if needed, the mechanic is really not sure what is wrong, or should I put the girl to rest and move on. I have come across a 1997 Isuzu Rodeo with a V6 and 150,000 miles on it that I can get for around 3 grand. Any suggestions?
  • tkevinblanctkevinblanc Posts: 356
    Huh. I didn't check to see if there was power at the switch... I'll have to think how to do that since it selects which resistor to ground (according to the write up you sent me earlier). The positive terminal connects directly to the blower motor. I get power there, but no ground (in fact, I could rig a simple on/off switch very easily... which I'm thinking is my temporary solution to get through the rest of summer while I research this).

    The wires from the blower motor disappear above the panel at the front seat passengers right foot. Unfortunately, it looks like they disappear into a plastic tube with other wires. There is a metal box behind that panel, but it looks like quite a few wires connect to it. I'll look harder.

    Thanks for the thought.
  • wlbrown9wlbrown9 Posts: 836
    I have a '00 Trooper LS 2wd. Always burned a little oil, now with almost 120K miles it looks to be a quart every 1500-2000 miles. The past couple of weeks I have been seeing some fluctuation on the oil pressure guage...it would drop down from just below the center marked 85psi to maybe 10-20 (guessing, but just maybe 2 needle widths about the 0 mark.) It usually happened at idle or coasting with no throttle and would stay down lower for a little then maybe bounce back up, then repeat later. Was time for an oil change so had that done and confirmed the oil was full. Still seeing that behavior, so Saturday afternoon I got the tools and some spray injector cleaner... Pulled the EGR valve and cleaned it good, plus the throttle body. Also replaced the PCV valve event though the old one seemed to be working, it was only $2.98 or so.

    So, after the cleaning I have not seen the oil pressure flux I was seeing. I'm keeping an eye on it. Wish I had cleaned the EGR valve before...it was real easy to get to and not much work to it. I would recommend all Isuzu owners do that if they have not already. Hoping it might slow the oil burn between changes, but that is not a critical issue with me.
  • serranotserranot Posts: 113
    I have heard through this board that the EGR affects oil consumption. I remain unconvinced only because I know what the EGR does and do not see how it can possibly affect oil consumption.

    If I was at a quart every 1500-2000, I would be jumping for joy . . . .

    Regards,
    Tom
  • wlbrown9wlbrown9 Posts: 836
    I did have some oil pressure flux yesterday and this morning but not as bad as the week before. So, I guess the cleaning may not have completely corrected the problem. I wonder if it could be the oil pump or even the sending sensor? Any suggestions?

    What about a bad PCV valve and oil consumption? I could see something that caused excess vacuum to promote sucking oil out or excess pressure forcing it the other way but can't really visualize exactly.

    Yep, I keep a quart of oil in the pocket in the back door and just need to make sure I check regularly. Once I get down I add some, usually twice during the 3500-4000 mile oil change cycle I'm in now.

    I'm kind of getting the new car fever, but have trouble trading the paid off Trooper for something with payments as long as it is running good.
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