Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





2008 Subaru Impreza WRX

1353638404149

Comments

  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    Most vehicles are flat bedded today. Very rare, at least in my neck of the woods, to see a tow behind tow truck.

    The latest Haldex versions that engage rear drive proactively are not bad

    Never said they weren't. They are actually quite good. Personally, I find it a bit deceiving when Audi placed the "quattro" badge on a Haldex equipped vehicle, when in fact their Torsen equipped vehicles are what made Audi receive praise for the "quattro" name.

    I would assume it is just a advertising or marketing ploy to use "quattro" on everything with AWD.
  • in case I missed anything (workstation is slamming through tests today):

    how can the '08 Impreza seats be improved?
  • Audi beyond its 4 year everything-covered warranty it could turn out to be expensive to own.

    As of 2007 the 4 year included maintenance is gone on Audis. Only BMW still offers this with new cars.
  • It's $590 now instead of included. Not bad, but slightly annoying....

    After more research on the A3, I'm back to leaning away from it. Reliability is hit or miss, it's overall more expensive, and only one '07 in Texas equipped the way I would like...
  • We have an 06 A3. It's been great but we bought it used 10 months ago from a nice yuppie couple who babied it. I would not buy one if you want anything approaching a performance vehicle. My wife loves hers but i'd go nuts driving it daily. It's way too soft for me.
  • I could be wrong, but, I thought A3 Quattros were Haldex and A4 Quattros were Torsen. IMHO, the Torsen appears to be a superior system.
  • A3 3.2 is Haldex and Haldex is FWD-biased junk. It's also used in the Mazdaspeed6.

    Ford/Volvo use Haldex systems in their cars too.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haldex
  • volkovvolkov Posts: 1,302
    As of 2007 the 4 year included maintenance is gone on Audis. Only BMW still offers this with new cars.

    They are offering it on 08 Tribecas up here in the Great White North. Nothing south of the 49th?
  • Subaru as a company doesn't offer "free" maintenance for 4 yr/50k miles like BMW still does and Audi/MB used to.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    how can the '08 Impreza seats be improved?

    You can purchase some aftermarket seats. Probably fairly in-expensive too. Try Recaro, Sparco there are probably others out there as well.

    -mike
  • I decided against the A3, mostly due to the reliability reports post 50k miles. As my father and ex-Audi mechanic put it: "German cars need a lot of attention and finesse when they get older." Plus I got a really good deal on the WRX, 700 below invoice. It's hard to argue with that kind of numbers. Thanks to all of the opinions on this site/discussion, they've been very helpful.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    You are correct about the models and which AWD systems they get.

    And Torsen is superior on the track, in conditions where you have grip and can take advantage of their ability to send power where there is more traction.

    However...Torsens have an achilles' heel - in frictionless situations they fail completely, and basically act like an open differential.

    So I wouldn't say it's always "superior", in fact on black ice it's the opposite, i.e. completely useless. In certain conditions (dry track) it's best, but not on ice.
  • thanks for heads up on reliability reminder and the torsen weakness. I was toying with Audi again but will now put 'em off the table for good.
    Where I live (lots of asphalt road hills, one audi dealer for 150 miles) would probably make life with an Audi miserable. :sick:

    but then again...don't the most recent Audis have systems that try to minimize wheel spin in those conditions where the torsen can't do it on their own?

    Hope you enjoy your WRX... I'm still considering one... :)
  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    It's also used in the Mazdaspeed6.

    Similar to Haldex, but, Mazda builds it in house. They do not source it from Haldex.

    Ford/Volvo use Haldex systems in their cars too.

    Volvo more so then Ford. Ford just uses is in their Taurus/Sable. The AWD system in the Edge / MKX /MKZ / Fusion / Milan are built in house by Ford. Not Haldex. The Mountaineer uses a full time AWD system, also built in house.

    I would stay away from Wiki as a source. I can go there right now and change any info they have.
  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    It's also used in the Mazdaspeed6.

    Similar to Haldex, but, Mazda builds it in house. They do not source it from Haldex.

    Ford/Volvo use Haldex systems in their cars too.

    Volvo more so then Ford. Ford just uses is in their Taurus/Sable. The AWD system in the Edge / MKX /MKZ / Fusion / Milan are built in house by Ford. Not Haldex. The Mountaineer uses a full time AWD system, also built in house.

    I would stay away from Wiki as a source. I can go there right now and change any info they have.
  • Avi, actually I wasn't using the Haldex Ford/Mazda/Volvo connection based on Wiki. Numerous car reviews point to Ford's umbrella of vehicles using Haldex. Regardless, Haldex is junk and the stuff in the Ford cars can only be called FWD-bias anti-performance junk too.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I think you are over-generalizing.

    FWD based part-time systems are fine for the type of people that buy those cars, i.e. they just want a little bit of extra traction when needed.

    Every system has its trade-offs. All of them. Cost, weight, extra drag, etc... there is always a catch.
  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    You beat me to it.
  • agreed wrt part time .vs. full time systems.

    Also, some react faster than others (the GM systems are nortoriously slow to engage, while the VW/Audi system is supposed to be relatively quick).

    My queries have tried to be towards whether the part systems _brake_ spinning wheels to let the __other__ wheels do the job, or (mostly) do not.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    It all depends on how they "tune" the traction control, I suppose.

    I know that Subaru lets VDC act first, to transfer torque, and only then will let the traction control go to work.

    Some, like Consumer Reports, see this as risky, as the tail can slide out, while others will see this as fun and unintrusive.

    It's up to you as to what you prefer.

    I can say that my Sienna has VSC, and Toyota's system acts a bit too early. I was climbing a snowy ramp and it would retard my momentum. I made it, but next time I may turn off VSC before trying to climb a steep slope.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    And now we have the "second generation VDC" which is on the 08 STi :) Just to add more confusion.

    I have VDC with ABLS on my Armada and it works real well for a street car. It'll brake a wheel if it slips creating a limited slip on both front and rear axles. If that doesn't control the skid it then limits power. Quite un-intrusive even when pushed to the limit. I wouldn't use it on track, but for street it's great.

    -mike
  • aaykayaaykay Posts: 539
    I am looking long and hard at the upcoming STi but the requirement to put 93 Octane fuel is pretty constricting, since in these parts, the most I can get is 92 Octane. Several journalists (based in CA) also felt that when testing the STi, they were not getting its whole potential, since only 91 Octane fuel (premium) was available in California. I know that the engine will automatically retard timing to compensate for the lower-grade fuel but I just wish Subaru had tuned (and tested) the car to run with the more commonly available 91Octane.

    When making cross-country trips, there are places where the best obtainable fuel is 87 Octane. I put it briefly in my WRX (in Iowa) during a trip a few months back and drove along at low rpms, till I got to a station that sold premium, around 120miles away ! Don't know if the STi would have tolerated that fuel, for so long.

    Also, the flat seats are a BIG turnoff in a high-performance car. The previous generation was nasty from that perspective and the new one is also no different on that score. The whole world gets great sport-seats in the STi and the US alone is saddled with a "flat stool". Hopefully Subaru will provide a more higher performance seat as a option, since there have been some murmers along those lines in Subaru forums like Nabisco.

    Obviously price is also a factor when considering the STi, since at the $40K mark, there are several other alternatives, even though for sheer handling and high-perf equipment levels, the STI is hard to beat. We'll see.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,691
    While 93 octane is preferred, it will run on 91 octane.

    Bob
  • It'll run on 87 too. It's not going to hurt the engine to throw in an 87 octane if you're in a real pinch...it'll just run weaker and less efficiently.
  • Has anyone compared the Impreza WRX to the Outback XT?

    If so, can they tell me if the WRX has a broader powerband (I.e., engine responds earlier in the torque curve than the XT does)? ((I'm trying to find time to drive a WRX auto but have not been successful as of late)).

    I'm considering the Forester '09 which is using the same powertrain as the WRX.
    If Forester/Impreza engine's more tractable, that would be good reason to hold off on the Outback.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,691
    The big advantage, from a power standpoint, is that the Outback XT has a 5-speed automatic, and the WRX a 4-speed auomatic.

    The Outback is also a much nicer and much roomier vehicle, but it's also much more expensive. It won't be quite as nimble and fun to drive as the WRX, however.

    Bob
  • I definitely found more room in cargo space of Outback .vs. WRX, but passenger space seems about the same (both are pretty snug). Outback has nicer seating positions, though (Passenger in WRX = sitting in bathtub).

    Driving both Outback XT and H6 5-spd autos around town revealed annoying hesitations below around 3 K rpm. On next/last test drive I'll try some posted forum suggestions that will minimize that.
  • aaykayaaykay Posts: 539
    I drive an 07 WRX auto wagon and the engine is extremely tractable. There is power from right off idle and upto the higher rpms. Also, I believe the Auto needs a few 1000 miles to really break in, since the transmission has got an inbuilt learning capability. Driving a new Auto vehicle will be misleading from a driveability standpoint.

    On the other hand, I drive my friend's 5-spd 02 WRX quite a bit and find that the engine is afflicted with what I term as the severe rubber-band effect. Nothing below 3000rpms and then WHAM....very frustrating to drive, when you need to squirt into tight spaces in a hurry.
  • aaykayaaykay Posts: 539
    Also, another point to note about the WRX Auto is that unlike the 07 and earlier model years, the 08 has the same type of driving capability as the lesser Imprezas.

    The pre-07 WRXs (among all the Imprezas including the Forester XT Auto) with the Auto, came with VTD, which is an AWD system that drove with 55% of the power going to the rear wheels (as the default) and came with a planetary gear center diff and transfer clutches (like the Legacy GT Auto and Outback XT).

    The 08 WRX auto on the other hand, lacks a center diff and drives with most of the power on the front wheels. If you disconnect a fuse, you can even make it 100% front-wheel-drive, since it does not have a Center Differential. Obviously unlike the 07 and earlier WRXs, the 08 also lacks the rear LSD, while it comes with the stability control system (VDC).
This discussion has been closed.