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Pickups Towing Questions

I have a T100 and recently bought a boat while my truck does ok towing on flat road it struggles on inclines is ther anything I can do to make it better without breaking the bank
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Comments

  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    This discussion is for the people who need to drag small countries behind their trucks :)

    kcram - Pickups Host
  • dee18dee18 Posts: 2
    Have been looking at Dodge 3500 4.1 rear wheel ratio, dual wheels, super crew cab, or Ford 350 with tow boss pkg. (4.3 rear wheel ratio), also crew cab. Need to have automatic in either. We have been told the Dodge would be able to handle 18,800 lbs, but the towing information on this vehicle do not support that information (indicates 15,500lbs). The Ford 350 is rated for that 18,000. Want to be sure the vehicle we buy will safely tow the toy hauler.
  • wpalkowskiwpalkowski Posts: 493
    Dodge is a nice looking truck, but in my opinion the Ford has the better automatic transmission and it doesn't need any supplemental cooling. Have also heard good things about the Tow Boss package.
  • dee18dee18 Posts: 2
    Thanks for responding.
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    Well, as I look at the manufacturers spec sheet, I can only see a maximum 17,700 pound towing rating for the RAM 3500 (2006) with a Gross Combined Weight Rating of 23,000 lb.

    As to transmissions, the 5R110W in the big Fords are most certainly heavy enough, but the 545RFE used in the Dodge is more than adequate for the weight rating. In fact, this is the very same transmission used in the new RAM chassis cab with GCWR at 26,000. And the 545RFE has no equal for reliability. In fact, no aftermarket supplier makes a kit for this transmission so few of them develop a problem.

    Regards,
    Dusty
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    One clarification...

    The Ram 3500 uses the 545RFE only with the Hemi V8. The 2007 Ram 3500 Chassis Cab uses the Aisin AS68RC 6-speed automatic with the new 6.7 liter Cummins, and after January, the 07 pickups with the 6.7L Cummins will use the 68RE 6-speed automatic (which will be based on the 545RFE).

    Those maximum GCWRs mentioned are with the Cummins... the Hemi can not tow that much - GCWR with the Hemi is 17,000.

    kcram - Pickups Host
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    Yes, and the RAM chassis cab with the 5.7 Hemi will use the 545RFE.

    I do see that the way the February pre-release reads it is not clear that the 23,000 GCVW rating is with the Hemi or the Cummins, but the newer publically issued sheet does state 17,000 for either Hemi.

    Thanks for the clarification and correction.

    My point is the 545RFE has a record of superior reliability in all of the Dodge applications. A couple of years ago an ATRA newsletter commented that the 545RFE was the benchmark for durability and reliability. The 6R110W is a very robust design and has been a good transmission, but any advantage it may have over the 545RFE is marginal in my opinion. Failures of the Torque Converter Clutch (which causes that pie-shaped one-piece pump to clog and chew its self up) mar an otherwise excellent transmission.

    Best regards,
    Dusty
  • I presently own a 2001 Dodge3500 dually with the 5.9 Cummins and an auto tranny. I also have the 3.55 gears. I am planning on buying a 37ft 5th wheel that weighs 11650 empty and grosses at 13,975. I am completely new to this towing thing and someone says I don't have enough truck. How can this be? I see one ton duallys towing every day. Any help would be appreciated..
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    Your drawbacks are the axle ratio and the transmission. The Cummins had a lower rating for automatic-equipped trucks until mid-2003. And it is always rated lower with the taller (lower numericcally) axle. I had a 96 3500 dually with the Cummins/automatic/3.54 and it could not legally tow more than 10K. My 05 3500 dually Cummins/automatic/3.73 can tow 13,500... had I gone with the 4.10, I could tow 15,500.

    Your truck may indeed be capable of it, but if you go into a state that requires you to hit the scales, you could be in trouble.

    kcram - Pickups Host
  • I noticed in the handbook (Finally) that with a 4:10 rear end I could tow up to 12,050. I was also told that if I use the turbo boost equipment by Edge that I would have no trouble hauling the 14k around. The truck also has an additional leaf spring on each rear axle. Also, my brother in law and sister have a fith wheel and have travelled all 48 lower states and have never had to use a weigh station as they are not concerned with recreational vehicles. I am more concerned about being safe than anything. Do you think changing out the rear end would be a wise move????? If this is feasible how would one go about getting the official figures changed.......
  • You can't get the "official figures" changed, even if you did all the mods. You vehicle is defined by it's VIN #, and the label on the inside of the door frame. That's what the law goes by if you ever had an accident while towing.
  • i drive a 06 dodge 3500 whith the six speed transmission and with a cummins. i haul horses for a living and i have a 38 foot 12 horse trailer. the trailer on its own wheighs 10k. loaded around 19k to 23k. and i do just fine with that truck. but i do recommend hydroelectric brakes for your trailer.
  • how is the cargo space on the 06 serria :confuse: ;)
  • stannstann Posts: 9
    I am in the process of installing a 5th wheel hitch through the bed and into the frame of the subject vehicle. I have heard that there is a service bulletin advising dealers that the 'hydroformed' frame of this vehicle CANNOT BE DRILLED, and that a special NO DRILL mounting kit for any 5th wheel hitch is required. I have been unable to obtain any information from my dealer.
    Does anyone have any information on this subject, please?
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    Check the Dodge Body Builder's Guide at http://www.dodge.com/bodybuilder/index.html

    From all I have heard, it is accurate that the hydroformed frame cannot be drilled.

    kcram - Pickups Host
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    I'm not sure I see why. If you look at the frame on a 2500 or 3500 there already are factory installed holes in some places. Perhaps holes are permissable in strategic places. I don't know.

    The frame on RAM pickups gets its strength from the fully boxed design, and hence the wall thickness is thinner and lighter. I would think that this would lend itself to drilling more so than the C-channel design.

    On C-channel frames the prohibition is no drilling on flanges (ever!). Drilled holes must be a certain distance from the top and bottom flanges, as well as a certain distance from other holes, drilled or pre-existing.

    I went to the Dodge site and couldn't find any comments regarding drilling.

    Regards,
    Dusty
  • KCRamKCRam Mt. Arlington NJPosts: 3,516
    The various comments I've read about this have to do with fifth-wheel installations more than anything else. Apparently, the location of fifths was in such a place that drilling though the bed and frame at that spot compromised some integrity.

    Not surprisingly, the new 3500 Cab/Chassis is a traditional flat C-channel frame.
  • i am looking to buy a used 3500 dually to pull my horse trailer 10,000lbs empty 20,000gcwr what year would you recomend?
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    Well, although the RAM has been an exceptionally solid truck, I think the newer the better. The 2002-03s had some electrical problems, mostly with poor electrical connections, but some Central Timer Module and Instrument Cluster Assembly failures.

    From 2004 on even electrical problems seems to have diminshed considerably.

    With that kind of weight you anticipate, I think you're confined to looking at a diesel version. And as most people know, folks really love their Cummins engines.

    Best regards,
    Dusty
  • Has anyone here installed aftermarket gauges, the pod type with a pyro, trans, rear end, boost on a F250 W/ a 7.3? I would like to know what is going on under the hood while towing a heavy load. I dont really want to do a bunch of drilling into parts to install sensors and the like.
  • blufz1blufz1 Posts: 2,045
    Make sure your coolant,oil,and transmission fluid are fresh and topped up so you don't damage the truck you have. Run in a lower gear and look for an aluminum bass fishing rig. :)
  • At 20000lbs, you're better off with a used F-450 or Chevy 4500 or 5500. The Ford is more of a "regular" dually sized truck. The Chevy is more of that "macho" medium duty bobtail truck ;)
  • johnboy8johnboy8 Posts: 2
    With all of the experienced people on this site I'm hoping you can help me select a new truck. I need a solid truck that will pull 4500lbs upon occasion. I would like it to get good gas mileage when I'm not towing with the prices being so high. What kinds of trucks would you guys/gals suggest.

    JohnBoy
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    A V8 equiped Dodge Dakota.

    Regards,
    Dusty
  • Dusty is right. But if gas mileage is a concern, not the hemi but the 4.7 V8. Hey Dusty, are you really Dr. Z in disguise? This is quite the Mopar Site. Just kidding. Johnboy, the small GM V8's in regular cab shortbed trucks could work too.
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    Nope. I'm not Dr.Z. In fact, I think Dr. Z deserves a swift kick in the pants as he departs taking his ignorant and arrogant Daimler-Benz crew with him!

    Regards,
    Dusty
  • cptchetcocptchetco Posts: 32
    In my experience, 4500# towing capacity is no problem for any of the domestic pickups, including Dakota and Ranger, as long as you have the towing package. We had problems with the S-10 trannys back in 1999 when used for towing.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Towing rule generally is you want to use no more than 75-85% of the rated towing capacity of the tow vehicle to safely tow your trailer. In addition be very careful on 2 other items:

    Trailer Brakes are usually required on any trailer over 1500-2000lbs by the tow vehicle manufacture

    Weight Carrying (standard hitch/tounge) Rating v. Weight Distributing (external bars that help distribute the weight) Rating often times folks hear "10,000lb towing" but don't realize that there is the little * which denotes "when properly equipped" and this usually means a weight distributing hitch.

    -mike
  • Hello, I got a 99 f-350 dually with the 7.3l diesel engine, I was wondering if anyone knew the total towing capacity of this vehicle - I need to tow a 15,000lb loaded 32ft trailer which I believe it can handle, but would like to know the maximum poundage this truck can handle.

    Thanks
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Is the trailer a 5th wheel or gooseneck trailer? I'm assuming it is if it weighs 15k lbs.

    -mike
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