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Midsize Sedans 2.0

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Comments

  • The Accord's back seat is not the roomiest in this segment, that's for sure.

    I don't think it was optimized for people; it is fantastic for child restraints. Each position does an excellent job of holding a child/infant seat using the LATCH system. The bench is flat and does a great job of holding the infant seat in the correct position and it's very easy to get the seat in there good and tight.
    I find the backseat of the Subaru more comfortable for people (2 medium sized adults is the limit, but my family runs small), but because of the seat belt arrangement it is difficult to use a rearward facing infant seat in the center position. Because of the door shape, it is more difficult to load the babyseat into the cradle with the Subie than the Accord.
  • zzzoom6zzzoom6 Posts: 425
    Why are you comparing a hatchback with a sedan?
    Mostly because I have one, and that was the car type I was looking at on Mazda's website before I began comparing the Accord to the 6. Doesn't really matter anyway... the sedan and hatchback have similar dimensions except for the storage capacity.

    I'd avoid a hatchback because of the lessened structural rigidity (more rattles) since I will keep a car a long time.

    My Honda Accord hatchback held up pretty well as did my Legacy wagon, so I headed into the Mazda6 hatchback with a fair amount of confidence that they would be pretty solid. Having that much more useable space with these two body types in my previous cars made this a pretty important feature that I wanted to have. I just am annoyed that sedans don't use their space as effectively as hatchbacks or wagons. And if you don't want a car that has less structural rigidity, the mazda6 feels more solid than the accord even in hatchback form... although the accord has a very solid feel, the mazda felt like it handles the twisties with a bit more composure.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    The back seat of the Accord is very comfortable for two people, but not three, unless they are small kids. I rode in back a few times, and the seat is nice. There is just not enough hip/shoulder room for three adults.
  • I'd avoid a hatchback because of the lessened structural rigidity (more rattles) since I will keep a car a long time.

    Given the last 2 Civics and the Accord in my life, if I was that afraid of rattles I would've avoided Honda altogether.

    I haven't had an issue with rattles in the Subie wagon, or the Sienna. The new Accord is so softly sprung I don't expect it to rattle ever (although we might have to do something about that spring rate ;) ).
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,710
    The back seat of the Subaru Legacy is more comfortable for two adults than the Accord's back seat? Not in my experience. I found plenty of leg room in the Accord. The Legacys I've sat in were more cramped than some compact cars in back. Although I like several things about the Legacy, including its AWD, I had to strike it off my list right there.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I'm wondering what's wrong with your Accord; it is firmer than most of its competitors (except for Mazda 6 and Ford Fusion).

    In fact, my 06 Accord is firmer than my '96 or my grandmother's '02.

    The only two Hondas we've ever had (out of the last 8 I remember) that rattled at all were my dad's 2003 Accord and our 2000 Odyssey.

    My 1996 is still relatively tight and rattle free after 174,000 miles. My grandmother's is as well, and she has 89,000 miles on her car.
  • The back seat of the Accord is very comfortable for two people, but not three, unless they are small kids. I rode in back a few times, and the seat is nice. There is just not enough hip/shoulder room for three adults.

    Size and comfort are kind of separate issues though. The size seems fine, the fact that is so flat makes it less comfortable for people but great for child seats.
    I can think of more comfortable cars, if not in the same class. I think the G35 sedan rear seats (and the FX35 seats) are the most comfortable ones my butt has has the privilege to grace.
  • gc1615gc1615 Posts: 3
    After being in the back seat of test drives back to back, and being 6' 200lbs, I personally thought the Altima felt much better. I had my wife's grandmother that we had to talk into even trying anything but an Accord (stubborn!) and she did (tried to get a door that was easie for her to open and not kick it). I can say she is now driving an 07 SL Altima and describes it as heavenly. This is after a 99 and 03 Accord. This weekend in the back of the Altima we had myself, my father in law 6'4 250 and in the middle a 4'11 160lb grandma. The roofline was a little short for my father in law though.
  • I'm wondering what's wrong with your Accord; it is firmer than most of its competitors (except for Mazda 6 and Ford Fusion).

    In fact, my 06 Accord is firmer than my '96 or my grandmother's '02.

    The only two Hondas we've ever had (out of the last 8 I remember) that rattled at all were my dad's 2003 Accord and our 2000 Odyssey.

    My 1996 is still relatively tight and rattle free after 174,000 miles. My grandmother's is as well, and she has 89,000 miles on her car.


    The '93 & 95 Civics and the '93 Accord all are virtual symphonies on the highway, especially when the weather turns cool. The speedometers squeaked, the dash rattles, the back window creaks on the Civics, the front window squeaks on the Accord. Clunks don't count, that just means something is broken, these are squeaks and rattles. Whats even weirder is that these cars spent most of their lives in CA, where the roads are relatively smooth, at least compared to MI.
  • The back seat of the Subaru Legacy is more comfortable for two adults than the Accord's back seat? Not in my experience. I found plenty of leg room in the Accord. The Legacys I've sat in were more cramped than some compact cars in back. Although I like several things about the Legacy, including its AWD, I had to strike it off my list right there.

    I can't think of the last time I had to transport someone over about 5'10", and he had plenty of legroom, if not hip-room as compromised by the infant seat. I guess for our heights, I find the back seat very comfortable, although like I said, not as much as the G35.
  • oldcemoldcem Posts: 309
    I agree with you. My experience with Ford has been a lot better than my luck with Honda. I've had 4 Escorts, a German Fiesta, and 2 Jaguars. All have been very good.

    Regards:
    OldCEM
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    German Fiesta

    Oktoberfest meets Cinco de Mayo? :)
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    The Accord feels more "airy" and roomy to me, but its something intangible that I can't really back up, so I won't try to.

    Well, since EPA says Accord has 103 cubic feet of passenger volume vs. 96 for Mazda6, there must be a little extra space here and there in the accord. So what you say makes sense. I think the way some talk about the Mazda6 being "cramped" overstates the differences, however.
  • I'm not complaining about my luck with Honda either, they were inexpensive and reasonably durable. The Fords were also. Both where reasonably cheap to repair. The only huge POS we had was a Reliant and that was so long ago I can't be mad about it, the whole company has changed hands 3x since then.
    That and they redeemed themselves with the Grand Voyager that ran great and lasted a long long time.
    Honestly, everyone is nit-picking details, its very hard to make a bad choice in this segment in aggregate, although some choices are better for some people than others.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    There's an old expression....perception is reality. That 7 cubic feet might make a difference to some, a non-issue for others.
  • mz6greyghostmz6greyghost Posts: 1,230
    So you use the actual key to unlock the door. Slide the FOB into the slot near the steering wheel and the FOB will start the car even though the Intellikey craps out.

    That's how I understand it.

    I hope I never have the opportunity to find out.

    You and me both! :)
  • jd10013jd10013 Posts: 779
    From my understanding, Its not the Ikey that starts the car, per se. the sensors in the car scan for it, or rather the signal it puts out. if the car can not pick up that signal, it won't enable the starter. What the slot does, is puts the Ikey extremly close a sensor (not sure if its a different one) so its easier to detect the fob. Now I'm not a 100% sure of this next part, but i've read that the sensor behind the slot send out a signal that actually has a very, very, very small current to it that can power the Ikey just enough to send out its signal. I suppose you could test that by removing the battery from you Ikey, putting it the slot, then trying to start your car.
  • andres3andres3 CAPosts: 5,327
    What about security with Nissan's system, what do you do when some hacker invents a key that can detect your "code signal" 6 months from now rendering your keyless start useless or vulnerable to attack?
  • jd10013jd10013 Posts: 779
    very doubtfull. The equipment to do so is proprietary to nissan. Even their technicians have trouble pulling that info. And in order to do so, they'd need the key. and if you have the key, why would you need to figure out the signal coming from the key. not that it would be impossible, but I doubt somebody with the technical prowless to do so would be targeting nissan altima's.
  • If that were the case it seems like today's key fobs would have been cracked years ago and people would be walking around mall parking lots stealing at will.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    The same would be true of garage door openers/homelink systems too, and you don't hear of that happening either.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    The Accord used to be stolen more than most other cars. I wonder how many 7th gen Accords (with the immobilizer system) have been stolen? If any.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Last I heard, the Escalade is now at the top of the Most Stolen list.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    It's already been done. I heard on the news, your car could be gone in 60 seconds, by a thief with a laptop and radio receiver.
  • zzzoom6zzzoom6 Posts: 425
    not that this is related to midsize cars really, but still an interesting article on how anti-theft systems in cars can be overcome... and how insurance companies sometimes won't believe that these systems are defeatable and then won't pay for your stolen car!!!
    link Pinch My Ride!
  • oldcemoldcem Posts: 309
    Don't know about that. This thihg was one of my favorite cars of all time. I equipped it with a 4 tube header, Pacesetter low restriction exhaust, removed all the emission controlls, retuned the Weber duece, and fitted it with a high performace clutch. The little Ford 1.6 would scream.

    Regards:
    OldCEM :)
  • oldcemoldcem Posts: 309
    I agree with you - except for Chrysler. They seem to be trailing the pack on quality control again.

    Regards:
    OldCEM
  • tallman1tallman1 Posts: 1,874
    Last I heard, the Escalade is now at the top of the Most Stolen list.

    Those lists can be misleading. Accords and Camrys are always near the top because there are so many of them out there.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,213
    This article tells us more about the system and what it is capable in the future. It expands on where it can and cannot compete with OnStar, navigation systems, and sattelite radio.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,213
    Mule pics of a new '09 grille and the hybrid mule.

    You might recall the renderings?
    image

    Ford had them taken down where they could because they are, according to some Ford sources on other forums, "spot on" renderings of the '09 production model. Doesn't confirm anything yet but very interesting to say the least.

    Note that the covered grille in the mule pics closely mirrors that of the rendering's grille.
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