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Midsize Sedans 2.0

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Comments

  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    That...

    image

    ... takes the cake, IMO.
  • urnewsurnews Posts: 668
    What is that?
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Voice activation for over 700 commands, I believe.
  • I drove the 750il and adjusted specific idrive settings while driving. Now I don't read the manual to see what the 100s of settings for for, but in 1 minute I set up the car for me. The new incarnation of the idrive is far and away better than the old, but I'd rather have idrive than 100s of buttons.

    There are a few issues here.
    1. The increasing complexity of vehicles leads to 1000 tiny buttons or having a control structure like i-Drive or Audi's MMI.
    2. The original incarnation of i-Drive was not a user centered design, and I doubt they did use cases to determine the feature set. I think they made a big list of task and put them on different menus. There was no prioritizing tasks and very limited short-cuts.
    3. More recent versions of i-Drive are based on a combination of prioritized menus and standard buttons, making for an easier to use/simplified interface
    4. The design changes with each iteration and with each model (3ser,5ser,7ser) so there is little consistency between models/revisions, so there is a learning curve with each edition.
  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    Yep.

    60-70% of the time, I use voice control in my TL (the picture is from 2008 Accord). The rest is done via touch screen (unfortunately, no longer an option in the new Accord).
  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    I will take well placed, easy to read buttons over anything that remotely resembles i-Drive or a jog dial.

    For folks that are intimidated by buttons (and the count of), I feel touch-screen menu may be the better way to go. Select function then have the buttons related to it on the screen. It is the way I control audio controls in my TL. The buttons below the screen are redundant and could be used when at a complete stop (or if anything goes wrong with LCD over time).

    I read somewhere that Audi/VW is planning use of touch screen dash. Great idea. Although, I hope there is also some room for fall back option. After 6-7 years, I don't want to learn that there is no way to control features if the touch screen dies (like those small digital cameras that are getting rid of optical view finders in favor of LCD/EVF... the LCD breaks, the camera is rendered virtually useless).
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    I *hate* let, me emphasize, *hate* voice activation. I don't know if the 750 had it or not, but I wouldn't use it if it did.
  • moparbadmoparbad Posts: 3,842
    Ford's Sync supposedly has fantastic voice recognition/activation. I have not tried it yet.
  • baggs32baggs32 Posts: 3,210
    Ford's Sync supposedly has fantastic voice recognition/activation. I have not tried it yet.

    Me neither but I've heard the same thing and have watched several online demos and videos of Sync in action. If we get another Ford I'm definitely paying the $300 for Sync. I'm sold.

    What will the 2008 Accord voice commands control? Sync allows you to control everything from your bluetooth cell phone (which can be in your purse or pocket) right down to the mp3 player you have plugged into the USB port. That USB port allows you to get software/feature updates into the system using your own USB drive too IIRC. Pretty cool IMO.
  • 60-70% of the time, I use voice control in my TL (the picture is from 2008 Accord)

    Voice is a good option, especially when it works correctly. The car is a horrible place to try to do sound recognition, it requires expensive mics and noise canceling software, etc.

    The rest is done via touch screen (unfortunately, no longer an option in the new Accord).

    Touchscreen = eyes off road time. No tactile feedback that your finger is on the button, or that it pressed the button means you have to look every time. A real button is a ballistic motion for your body. Even in my 3 mo old Accord the main radio controls are operated by touch not by looking.
  • Me neither but I've heard the same thing and have watched several online demos and videos of Sync in action. If we get another Ford I'm definitely paying the $300 for Sync. I'm sold.

    What will the 2008 Accord voice commands control? Sync allows you to control everything from your bluetooth cell phone (which can be in your purse or pocket) right down to the mp3 player you have plugged into the USB port. That USB port allows you to get software/feature updates into the system using your own USB drive too IIRC. Pretty cool IMO.


    Due to a somewhat sudden change of events, the Accord is likely to get flipped for a Fusion or Focus, and whatever I get will have Sync. I am anxious to try it out.
  • tedebeartedebear Posts: 832
    My Sebring with MyGIG has voice activation that works great. I think I remember reading in the manual that it has a 1,000 word vocabulary. It's fun to play with as I cruise along.

    The Bluetooth phone interface also works fine. I recently read some comments that others were having trouble getting their systems to recognize their cell phones.
  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    Voice Recognition works! That is why I rely on it a lot. The new Accord's is even better (than my TL), especially when it comes to NAV related functions. The only challenge happens when someone "naughty" happens to be in the car, who takes pleasure in confusing the system.

    As for touch screen, it isn't as better than an intuitively laid out dash, but it reduces number of "buttons" by getting only the selections related to function you chose. I agree, real buttons are better, but not always. They need to be laid out well, and distinctly marked (that they require no more than a glance, just like it would be with touch screen), and can be felt with a little learning. That takes me back to Honda, and why I feel they know how to get those little things done, well (but apparently, few recognize the point of having mostly dedicated buttons). Take a look here again...
    Voice Recognition works! Thats why I rely on it for most part. The new Accord's is even better (than my TL), especially when it comes to NAV related functions.

    As for touch screen, it isn't as better than an intuitively laid out dash (again, tough to beat Honda there, although, it is quite a challenge in my TL to figure out the buttons), but it drastically reduces eyes off the road when I want to use it (which is usually when I'm at a light/stopped). The best bet is with buttons that are not only grouped well but "feel" different than others.

    image

    - Well marked, easy to read buttons
    - Logically grouped
    - Multi-push buttons (like fan speed, category, skip, scan etc) have notches at the end to differentiate from others (that can be "felt" so with a little learning, the driver can simply position the finger and operate them).

    Here is another example of thoughtful design (note the presence of dots)...
    image

    And of course, the buttons on the steering wheel. They are distinctly designed, large enough and easy to read. One of the problems I have had with my TL is between bluetooth selection and voice activation buttons in that they look/feel very similar. Honda addressed that with the new Accord. Now bluetooth selection is flush with the spoke on the rim and voice activation button stays put.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    The 2008 Accord joins the Legacy as the only mid-sized family sedans that are IIHS "top picks", meaning they scored "Good" in front, side, and rear crash tests and have ESC at least optional (but standard on the Accord).

    http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr111507.html

    One question, though: I wonder why the IIHS tested the Accord thoroughly within a month of its introduction, yet the Altima's been out for a year and hasn't been tested by the IIHS for side crashes yet, nor has the Optima, which has been out for over a year and a half in its present form? It's not like the Altima isn't a popular seller. The Optima less so, but it sells more units than many other cars that the IIHS has managed to squeeze into their test schedule in the past 18 months. Interesting...
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    What about the Sonata? Are these cars not on the list because they weren't tested, or because they didn't make the "top safety pick" cut?
  • In the case of both the new Camry, and now the new Accord, IIHS test results are posted almost immediately after official introduction. This begs the question: Is this because of their respective popularity and sales, or payola on the part of manufacturers? No other vehicle or manufacturer results are fast-tracked in this fashion.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Sonata not listed in that news release because it is not a "top safety pick" (or "also ran"). It is listed here: http://www.iihs.org/ratings/summary.aspx?class=30

    with "acceptable" for side, that is why it did not make the list.
  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    Conspiracy theory, again! :sick:

    Of the sixteen vehicles listed in that link (previous post), only one is from 2007 (Kia Optima). 2008 Accord and Camry have been out for couple of months but 2008 Malibu is the newest, and still found itself being tested. Payola?
  • chronochrono Posts: 149
    Well not exactly. It looks like the rear and side impact crash tests were not performed on the 2008 Malibu. Side impact was not tested on the new Altima. Seems fishy to me.
  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    Quit whining. Were Accord and Camry the only cars tested? Do you think they are not interested in testing the newest entries? (then why do they have even the front ratings in yet?)
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