Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Midsize Sedans 2.0

1543544546548549742

Comments

  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    Looks kind of ugly to me, but I would be willing to give them the benefit of the doubt and actually look at one in person. I like the focus we have.
  • m6userm6user Posts: 3,048
    edited January 2012
    cars.com(kicking tires) just posted about Fusion with lots of pics and info like below which is somewhat different than what was posted by akirby.

    "Drivetrain: 170-hp, 2.5-liter four-cylinder, 179-hp, turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder or 237-hp, turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder with six-speed manual (1.6-liter only) or six-speed automatic; front- or all-wheel drive (Fusion); 185-hp (combined), 2.0-liter four-cylinder with electric motor (Fusion Hybrid, Energi)"

    above from cars.com kicking tires blog

    Looks like they got rid of the shiny plastic chrome grill which always completely turned me off and still does on several of Fords vehicles.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    The 1.6L fuel economy is impressive--matches many compacts. The rear looks very Mazda6-ish to me. Not a bad thing, as I think that car is good looking (just drove one for a week). I haven't warmed up to the Big Gulp grille yet though. I think it would look better with less chrome, maybe a cross-weave pattern vs. the bars. It looks out of place with the rest of the car, which is very sleek. Dash looks to be a big improvement over the current car.

    The 1.6L with a 6MT could be not only a great value (as long as Ford doesn't do something stupid such as make a key feature like cruise or Bluetooth unavailable on the base model) but fun to drive with excellent FE.

    Wonder how the all-new Altima will compare?
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,747
    Looks kind of ugly to me

    You think the Camry looks better than this? Where is that double facepalm when you need it........
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,747
    Yep, the 2.5L is still there but not mentioned in the Ford press release. I guess they're focusing on the new engines, hybrids and PIH.

    The PIH will go 21 miles on electric only and should get the same 47/44 after that. The Volt will go 35 on electric only and only gets about 37 on the ICE.

    The regular hybrid can go 62 mph on electric only. Wow.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    Yeah, actually I do think the Camry looks better.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 15,677
    You need to have some cheap engine for the rental fleets!

    2015 Hyundai Sonata 2.4i Limited Tech (mine), 2013 Acura RDX (wife's) and 2007 Volvo S40 (daughters college car)

  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,747
    edited January 2012
    Very few fusions go to rental fleets. Most of the fleet sales are government. It's hard to find a Fusion rental car in most locations.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,253
    Had a Fusion from Hertz in Maui in 2010. Got it when our first vehicle, an Optima, threw a CEL.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,918
    Last time I rented, it was also a Fusion, also from Hertz. Maybe they're the only company offering them as rentals - not that I'm complaining. I was thrilled to have a Fusion instead of some of the less-palatable vehicles we usually have to choose from.

    MODERATOR
    Need help navigating? kirstie_h@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.
    Share your vehicle reviews

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    Yep, I got a Fusion SEL awhile back in Dallas. And a very nice rental it was. I think Hertz has quite a few Fusions in their fleets. But also a lot of Camrys, Malibus, and Altimas. They seem to have a LOT of Nissans in general.
  • mz6greyghostmz6greyghost Posts: 1,230
    Is it just me, or does this thing just scream for the 3.5L EB V6 and AWD? :)

    Even if it's a limited edition SVT, it would still draw some extra traffic to showrooms. All they need to do is detune the SHO V6 (down to, say, 300 HP) on regular gas. Add AWD, an upscale interior, a subtle body kit with a lip spoiler...
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,747
    You wouldn't need the 3.5L EB - you can get 310+ hp from the 3.7L NA.

    I expect a ST model with 300-320 hp with either a 2.7L EB or a 3.5/3.7L NA.

    There could also be a SVT model later with 350-400 hp. Since the CD4 platform will also be used for the new Taurus it makes sense that it was designed to handle the same powertrains as the Taurus SHO.
  • smarty666smarty666 Posts: 1,503
    Not sure where your living, but I've seen plenty of them in the rental car parking lots here in the NJ, PA, and NY areas.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    Not to mention Arizone.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,747
    Most of the reports I've seen on the web from frequent travelers say they never see Fusions now but see a lot of other makes. Maybe it varies by company. Fusion rental fleet sales are way down but they do sell a lot to government agencies and other commercial fleet customers. I don't expect the new Fusion to have much rental fleet if any at all.
  • We are in the market for a new "commuter car" (e.g. car used primarily for commuting to work), since our old Acura Integra is on its last legs. A very sad moment, since we have loved this car for 15 years. (Seventeen years if you count the version of it which was stolen and gutted when we lived in Boston, but that's another story.) We're looking at lots of different vehicles, of course. Having spent such a long time with our Acura, we have come to rely on (and enjoy) the "luxury car" experience -- namely, when the car needs fixing, the dealership automatically provides a loaner vehicle and sends you on your way while the car is fixed. No waiting, no hassle. Yes, of course, we're looking for a fantastic, reliable car, and many of the luxury cars fit that bill anyway, but let's get real: all cars need service every now and then. We'd like to make it as painless as possible to get that service.

    I guess we're wondering whether we might be able to "cheat" this time and get a nicely-appointed, reliable car (like a Toyota or Honda) but pay less for it than the "luxury" vehicles... and still not spend two hours waiting for that 30,000 mile check-up. Or take a "shuttle bus" to/from the dealership.

    Is there such a thing as getting an automatic loaner vehicle at a non-luxury dealership? Or is this really one of the reasons why people spend $5,000 - $10,000 more for that luxury car?
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    The answer is "Yes", but this tends to be more per dealer service policy than manufacturer policy. Once you have an idea of the brand/kind of car you want, you could check dealerships in your area to see if they offer free loaners for service. In my experience, many dealerships do that for major services, e.g. something that will take more than an hour or two, or if the car needs to be kept overnight. Other dealers offer free shuttle service to your home or business. I've found that works well for me with a dealer that is just a few miles away... they take me home, I work out of my home office all day, and come back later to get the car when it's convenient for me (i.e. when my wife can drive me over there). And some dealers offer two-way shuttles, e.g. to/from work or the airport.
  • m6userm6user Posts: 3,048
    edited January 2012
    Just because a dealer doesn't routinely provide a loaner doesn't mean it can't happen. If you use that as part of a negotiation I would think the dealer could flag your computer file to make it possible for you to get a loaner during your service visits. It may cost you a few hundred $$$ in price when you buy you the car but it would provide you with a service experience a little closer to what you've been used to. Remember though that it would only be at that dealer. If you moved or didn't end up liking the service at that dealer your "loaner deal" would not carry over to another dealer.

    Someone will probably say you could just rent a car from the dealer for the few times that service really took that long but I think you'd agree that it is a very different experience to just sign and jump in a loaner versus actually renting a car.

    Another thing to consider is buying an end of model year premium car may be not much more money than a newer non-premium car. And if you tend to keep your cars for a long time which it appears you do, it may be well worth it to drive the nicer vehicle for all those years.
  • I can give you my personal experience. Leased a Subaru Legacy in 09 from a dealer some 15 miles from my home. The deal sealer was the offer of a free loaner for service. I could have purchased from a dealer just two miles from my home, but the place was a zoo. I was waiting for a salesman and I hear a gong banged and someone yell out "congratulations, another person has purchased a car from us". Frankly, I prefer to deal with a serious concerned for the customer dealer, not a three ring circus.

    I would agree that this is probably something that could be negotiated with your deal.

    Personally, I think the 13' Fusion is a likely candidate for my next car but, I'm a bit nervous about going back to a big impersonal dealership after my pleasant experience with the relatively small dealership I'm currently with. Well, that purchase is probably a year or two away so I guess I won't worry about it.
  • gene84gene84 Posts: 9
    I've put 70,000 miles on a 2001 Prius and 190,000 miles on my 2004 Prius. I know of no one who has replaced a battery in a Prius. Over 95% of a NiMH battery is recycleable. I've been told they are available from some junk yards for about $500 or from the dealer for $2,200 to $2,600. Local Toyota service dept. told me they have yet to replace brakes on a Prius. Local taxi company has 12, 2004s and a number of 2010s. Oldest have over $400,000 miles - maint. mgr. says "they are bullet proof, you can't kill them". Prius has no timing belt (cost $1,500 on a Jetta at 100,000 miles and $4,000 to replace catalytic converter when it goes out). Also Prius has no transmission service (has electric motor). Prius has no belts or hoses to replqace. THE LIST GOES ON. Best reason to own a Prius is not the high MPG but low maintenance cost.
  • gene84gene84 Posts: 9
    I've put 70,000 miles on a 2001 Prius and 190,000 miles on my 2004 Prius. I know of no one who has replaced a battery in a Prius. Over 95% of a NiMH battery is recycleable. I've been told they are available from some junk yards for about $500 or from the dealer for $2,200 to $2,600. Local Toyota service dept. told me they have yet to replace brakes on a Prius. Local taxi company has 12, 2004s and a number of 2010s. Oldest have over 400,000 miles - maint. mgr. says "they are bullet proof, you can't kill them". Prius has no timing belt (cost $1,500 on a Jetta at 100,000 miles and $4,000 to replace catalytic converter when it goes out). Also Prius has no transmission service (has electric motor). Prius has no belts or hoses to replqace. THE LIST GOES ON. Best reason to own a Prius is not the high MPG but low maintenance cost.
  • crankeeecrankeee Posts: 297
    Very informative post. I wrongly concluded that the batteries were ahigh cost maintenance item after a friends Ford Escape required $6000 in new batteries. He traded for a new one with new batteries and warranty. We see lots of Prius models in our southern location. They "like" the warmer weather and the short intown commutes. I may consider a Prius for intown use as our fleet wears down and gas continues higher. Thanks
  • dudleyrdudleyr Posts: 3,456
    The prius may not have any belts, but it should have some hoses. I am pretty sure it has air conditioning and a radiator.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,253
    As of the 2010 model the Prius doesn't have any belts, but it still has hoses. See for yourself: http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/alternative/112_0903_2010_toyota_prius_first- _look/photo_21.html

    As for the transmission, it doesn't have a trans in the conventional sense but still has gears and a differential to get the ICE output to the wheels: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_Synergy_Drive#Transmission The Prius setup, as reliable as it may be in practice, actually sounds more complex than a regular AT or CVT.

    While you're correct that the Prius uses a timing chain & not a belt, your reference to the catalytic converter shouldn't matter as the Prius does have one - every modern car with an ICE does.
  • scwmcanscwmcan Niagara, CanadaPosts: 394
    So you are saying the Prius does not have an alternator? Seems strange to me. Any just because you can see any in that picture doesn't mean they are not there you can't really see anything in that pic the engine bay is too crowded. Has to have hoses for cooling the engine etc.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,253
    http://jalopnik.com/5129290/2010-toyota-prius-bigger-size-meets-bigger-fuel-econ- omy-+-50-mpg notes the lack of belts. The Wikipedia article, under Power Sources, explains how the alternator function has been replaced by the motor-generator.

    Hoses are plainly visible in the pic; that's why I linked to it. Plus, as long as there's an ICE, hoses (or pipes) will be necessary as part of the ICE cooling system.
  • cannon3cannon3 Posts: 296
    Well, after 6 years and 82,000 trouble free, rattle free, squeak free miles. My trusty 2006 Ford Fusion SEL V6 is gone. Decided with gas prices headed up to 4-4.50 a gallon I better downsize. Bought a 2012 Ford Focus SE hatch back with all kinds of goodies on it. Farewell mid-size sedan group!
  • Just wanted to post an update about my 2006 Hyundai Sonata GLS that I got for $16,000 brand new in Dec. of 2005 now has 75,000 trouble free miles on it. I now see that Hyundai's are closer priced to Honda and Toyota, but at that time the Sonata was about $5,000 less than an equally equipped Accord or Camry.

    There were a lot of people on this board that thought the Sonata would fall apart after the new wore off. I hope to have this car for at least five more years.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    My 2007 GLS turns five next month, 56k miles. I've owned it for 2-1/2 years (bought off a lease). It's been a great car for us. Still the original brakes, no major problems. Really the only problems have been a power recliner switch needed replacing a couple of years ago, and both sun visors had to be replaced as they kept flapping down--a common problem with this generation of Sonatas. Those fixes were done under warranty of course. Also used the roadside assistance a few times when my wife locked the keys in the car. That and the warranty expire in a few weeks. But I'm looking to get at least four more years out of the car, which my wife drives most of the time.

    BTW, I checked the KBB private party price on it the other day and it was only about $1000 less than I paid for it... shows the price escalation of Hyundais and cars in general in the past few years.
Sign In or Register to comment.