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Midsize Sedans 2.0

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Comments

  • igozoomzoomigozoomzoom Waleska, GeorgiaPosts: 790
    Exactly whose lifetime does the Chrysler Lifetime Powertrain Warranty cover- the vehicle's or the company's?

    Who wants to drive a Chrysler forever anyway? I imagine there would be a rather high rate of owners doing themselves in if they were stuck driving a Chrysler forever! :shades:
  • igozoomzoomigozoomzoom Waleska, GeorgiaPosts: 790
    A lot of buyers don't realize that almost all of these long-term (100k, Lifetime) warranties aren't transferrable if the car is sold. For example, Hyundai, KIA and Mitsubishi drop from 10-year/100,000 miles to 5-year/60,000 miles if transferred to a second owner during the warranty coverage period. Suzuki is one of the few makes that transfers the full warranty to a second owner.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Yep, and frankly, I think a 5 year / 60,000 miles bumper-to-bumper is still darn good. My girlfriend just bought an 07 Santa Fe and has 45k miles and 3 years left on her warranty, all without needing it to be "certified pre-owned" and costing more. Beats the major players by a long shot.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    The 10-year/100,000 miles that apparently becomes 5-year/60,000 miles, if transferred to a second owner, is a power train warranty not bumper-to-bumper.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,618
    Actually, in cases like Hyundai, Kia, and Mitsubishi, the 2nd owner gets the remainder of the 5 year/60k bumper-to-bumper warranty, which of course includes the powertrain.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Ah, I see. So basically the extended power train warranty is only for the original owner. I had thought their warranty (bumper to bumper) was 5 year/50K mi.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,618
    Yep. For a few years, Hyundai allowed the powertrain warranty to transfer within a family, but they stopped doing that in (I think) 2003. So I simply retain the title to my 2004 Hyundai while my son uses up its 10 year powertrain warranty. :)

    It's kind of funny I think that you can buy a used car (i.e. a certified used car) that has more manufacturer warranty than a new car. I nearly jumped on a one-year-old certified Sonata a couple months ago, as it had four years of bumper-to-bumper warranty and nine years of powertrain warranty. But I got a certified Rabbit instead, and it has 4 years of bumper-to-bumper warranty (vs. 3 years on a new VW).
  • patpat Posts: 10,421
    Join Consumer Advice Editor, Phil Reed, and other Edmunds staff for an auto industry chat tomorrow night, Wednesday, 9:00 -10:00 pm/et (6:00 -7:00 pm/pt). To enter the chat, click on the banner at the top of the page. See you there!
  • igozoomzoomigozoomzoom Waleska, GeorgiaPosts: 790
    It's kind of funny I think that you can buy a used car (i.e. a certified used car) that has more manufacturer warranty than a new car.

    That's why I bought a 2007 Accord LX V6 a few months back. A 2009 Accord has 3/36 bumper-to-bumper and 5/60 powertrain coverage. My '07 had 22k miles on it and is covered bumper-to-bumper for another 24 months (4yrs from original date sold) and 26k miles (48k from new). The powertrain warranty coverage is 7/100 from new, which is five years and 78k miles.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,622
    It's kind of funny I think that you can buy a used car (i.e. a certified used car) that has more manufacturer warranty than a new car.

    Not funny at all. You can buy a new car with the same extended warranty. For a certified used car the selling dealer is paying for the extended warranty and including it in the cost of the car. No different than any other added accessory.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Yep, and instead of making the warranty optional, so you can see what you are paying for it and decide if you think it is worth the cost, they call it "certified" so that buyers think it is magically better than some other used car they could buy and add a warranty to, if they chose to.
  • m6userm6user Posts: 2,896
    A couple of years ago I was test driving a "certified" car in January and as I and the salesman were driving I decided to turn on the heater fan as the engine had warmed and guess what? The fan didn't work at all. I wasn't too impressed with their certification inspection.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    Any car, new or used, has the estimated cost of the warranty factored into the price. The company has to decide if a long warranty will attract more customers, than the added cost of the longer warranty will deter. Companies who determine they have lost buyers, because of reliability issues in the past, are usually the ones who will benefit more from extending the warranty.
  • mz6greyghostmz6greyghost Posts: 1,230
    Amazing...

    A brand-new 2010 Legacy is about to be released: First Drive, and not a single word or opinion about it here?
  • m6userm6user Posts: 2,896
    You must have missed the lively discussion about this new model a couple of months ago. A lot of strong opinions expressed and a lot of pictures posted.
  • mz6greyghostmz6greyghost Posts: 1,230
    Nah, I remember it, it's just that now we're starting to get driving impressions. Plus, all this warranty talk is nauseating... ;)
  • ingvaringvar Posts: 205
    Car looks good and I love tech specs.
  • m6userm6user Posts: 2,896
    Agreed. I stated then and will reemphasize that I don't care for the bodywork on the new Legacy even though the interior, size, drivetrain and tech have improved a lot IMHO.
  • stephen987stephen987 Posts: 1,994
    It's ugly, and it's not clear that the US market will get the improved technology, suspension, and/or drivetrain. I'm waiting for a full road test of a US-spec car before I have anything further to say.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,618
    Oh yeah, I remember that car... the next incarnation of the soon-to-be-defunct Sebring, if I remember the consensus opinion. ;)

    Will be interesting to see if this new, larger Legacy with a back seat suitable for adult passengers can grab more than a miniscule portion of the mid-sized market, in which it is an afterthought. I mean, Toyota sells about twice as many Camrys in the US in a month as Subaru sells vehicles. :sick:
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