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Midsize Sedans 2.0

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Comments

  • dash5dash5 Posts: 417
    I think you're right about test driving. I really do want some of each, performance and luxury, which I understand comes at a premium but it's so subjective as to what feels sporty or how much road noise would bother you or what is "upscale". I'm coming from a 2001 4 cylinder Jetta that I use as my commuter, pretty much anything will be a jump in power and performance as well as luxury and amenities.

    My wife has the 2009 Honda CR-V and I like the interior of the Hondas, but before that our fun car was a 2004 Infiniti G35. So I know the pros and cons of both which I guess is why I'm all over the place!
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    So I know the pros and cons of both which I guess is why I'm all over the place!

    Sounds like my parents when they were car shopping back in 2008. They had a Civic and wanted a second car. They didn't have a CLUE what they wanted. They drove everything from a Hyundai VeraCruz to an Accent 3-door, a Ford Taurus, Chevy Impala, a year-old Caddy DTS, the then-new Accord, a Nissan Versa assorted Scions, and ended up with a 2008 Taurus with leather and sync.

    It was quite entertaining to watch them whittle down their list.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    First, I didn't mention the Escort--someone else did, and I simply asked a question about that comment because I wasn't sure the European Escort was the same car as the US version.

    Second, my statement re global cars was fully visible and thus was not "blanked."
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    The real world fuel economy advantages of a smaller car is more like 4-8 mpg using combined figures (nobody drives 100% highway).

    That's not my experience, with compacts and modern mid-sized sedans. I agree you can see that kind of difference between some subcompacts that are optimized for fuel economy, e.g. Yaris, and non-hybrid mid-sized sedans. But that is a huge difference in size and utility.

    And some folks do drive almost all highway, e.g. using a car for a long commute from rural areas. But I do urban driving almost all the time.
  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    First, I didn't mention the Escort--someone else did, and I simply asked a question about that comment because I wasn't sure the European Escort was the same car as the US version.

    Unbelieveable.....really..... if you feel so strongly about staying on topic, you should have gone to an Escort thread and asked that question. You should practice what you preach.

    If you feel so highly about not mentioning ANY other vehicles other then mid-sizers here then why are you not complaining about everyone else throwing their .02 in for their comments about non mid-sizers? Why just pick out mine?? My response about manufacturers being successful with globally produced cars was totally viable.....
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    Please take a breath and calm down. I wasn't "picking" on you. I did suspect you misunderstood my post about global cars. I was trying to focus (no pun intended) on the mid-sized market, as per the examples I listed. It looked like you thought I was addressing the entire car market, which was not my intention.

    Sorry for any misunderstanding.
  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,666
    But that is a huge difference in size and utility.

    Not if all you use it for is daily commuting. I went from a Lincoln LS to a Fusion and I'd have no problem switching to a Focus or Fiesta. It's just me driving back and forth to work most of the time.

    And there are lots of folks who think a 5 mpg improvement is huge, even though the actual difference between a 25 mpg and 30 mpg vehicle is about $5/week for 300 miles (2 gallons).

    Guess we'll just have to wait and see.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    Well, if it's for daily commuting over any distance, that's highway driving, right? Where the current mid-sizers shine, esp. the I4s. For example, I got 37 mpg highway on the OLD Milan--not the current one with even better FE.

    And there is more to a commuter car than fuel economy. For me, for long-distance commuting, a smooth, quiet ride is important. I think a mid-sizer like the Fulan or Camry or Sonata would do much better in that respect than a small car like the Fiesta. Then there's the weekends. If you want one car that can handle a variety of needs, a mid-sizer is a really good choice, also some of the compact 5-door hatches and wagons with interior room that rivals some mid-sizers.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,666
    In Atlanta there is no such thing as highway speeds and commuting. It's all stop and go or 30 mph, even on the interstates.

    But you're TOTALLY missing the point here. It's not what YOU want (or me for that fact). I guarantee you there are plenty of folks out there who want small cars with features and now Ford has options for them.
  • I understand the fuel economy part of the equation. I have a ~30 mile each way commute that is 98.4% highway at highway speed (unless its snowing; then everyone goes 10 mph and gets stuck because they have no momentum). My current vehicle gets 30+ mpg on that drive at typical 10 over speeds. With the old car, I would actually take the country roads that took longer to get home but were entertaining to drive. The new car doesn't give me the same inspiration.

    Could I drive a smaller vehicle? Yeah there is no reason I need a midsize car, but there was no financial incentive not to get one either. There were other incentives, like the Civic SI sedan would've been much more fun, but oh well.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,614
    as an fyi, my main ford dealer pays for an enterprise rental if they need to keep my car overnight.even when i had my focus. i may have to whine a bit(i'm standed at work).
    they also have shuttle service to and from work, so i can drop the car off in the morning and pick it up in the afternoon.
    i didn't buy my fusion there and bring it to the selling dealer for service, but all the other cars get serviced there.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    Your post was unintentionally funny. It was funny because I recall many other posts in Town Hall talking about traffic in Atlanta, and about how people are whizzing around at 80 mph all the time so you need a car with that kind of performance.

    I've driven in Atlanta a few times and I think reality is closer to what you described, except maybe late at night or on Sunday morning.

    Having lots of choices is a good thing. As long as one of the choices is still a basic small car with the kinds of attributes I described earlier.
  • stephen987stephen987 Posts: 1,994
    I'm fortunate that my Atlanta trips (maybe once or twice a month) are most often timed to avoid the worst of the rush hour period. I don't deal with it on a daily basis, so I'll defer to those who do. My own limited experience suggests that at rush hour on weekdays, stop and go for miles is the norm on the interstate. On the other hand, going through town in midafternoon, or on a weekend, the soccer moms in their Range Rovers on the Georgiabahn will try to flatten you if you're running less than 80-85. So you need a car-of-all-trades.

    For conditions like these, my ideal car would combine quick reflexes, excellent visibility, and enough sheetmetal to provide safety from the accidents you can't avoid. So as the best compromise I'd go for a sporty-handling midsize sedan with a V6 and a good automatic--probably a Fusion Sport or a Mazda 6s, but there are lots of good options.
  • But the typical buyer of a Focus/Cobalt/Aveo/Corolla/Civic/Elantra/Accent/Forte/Versa/Sentra etc. is looking first and foremost for economical transportation, IMO.

    Did you leave out the Mitsubishi Lancer by mistake or on purpose here? Just curious. :)

    2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS

  • m6userm6user Posts: 2,952
    Don't feel bad....Mazda3 is missing too. Probably just got tired of typing. ;)
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,682
    First, there was the "etc." :) Second, I intentionally left out the Mazda3 because I consider that car, especially the MazdaSpeed3 variant, as one of the "sporty" small cars I mentioned for which people are willing to pay a price premium over a typical small car. The Lancer, in certain trims, also fits that category.

    I didn't omit your favorite car as a slight. Chill, people. :shades:
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    So, now that there is a sales freeze on just about all Toyota's, this gives Ford a chance to take the lead in Fusion sales vs the Camry. Does any one think Ford will step up their marketing campaign?
  • stephen987stephen987 Posts: 1,994
    Not me. The Toyota freeze will last a couple of weeks, max. Besides, the Fusion plant in Hermosillo is pretty busy already.
  • mz6greyghostmz6greyghost Posts: 1,230
    So, now that there is a sales freeze on just about all Toyota's, this gives Ford a chance to take the lead in Fusion sales vs the Camry. Does any one think Ford will step up their marketing campaign?

    I doubt the Fusion will take the sales lead due to Toyota's issues (if anything the Accord will reclaim the title), and I also doubt that Ford (or any other automaker) will turn this into a marketing ploy, since Toyota's scenario is quite possibly the biggest nightmare for ANY automaker.

    Besides, the Fusion IMO is selling well in Ford's eyes. IIRC plants are running at capacity, incentives are very low (if any), and it's hard to find more than 3-4 Fusions on any Ford lot around here, let alone a specific model/color/option.
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