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Subaru Legacy/Outback Tire Issues

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Comments

  • The Outback calls for a 225/55/17 V rated tire and when I looked at the Sumitomo HTR+, they were only available in an "H" rating. I'm not a fan of going to a lower speed rated tire. I've read that V rated tires are less likely to fail from hitting potholes, etc than is an H rated tire.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    The failure rate of the speed rating has to do with heat, not potholes! Essentially the speed rating is the sustained speed you would need to go for the tires to blow out. It has nothing to do with pothole resistance.

    Unless you plan on doing a sustained speed over 130mph, you won't run into problems. I've ran em on track, on road, and through blizzards on my SVX, no issues.

    Also I live in NYC so I've hit potholes bigger than you can imagine.

    -mike
  • I am well aware that the speed ratings relate to speed and heat build-up. I understand there is also a relationshion to the strength of the tire. I've read that a tire with a higher speed rating provides greater resistance to failure, in a low profile tire, which I have read is more susceptible to damage from hitting a pothole.

    And yes, I'm also aware that there are a number of articles questioning why family cars such as Subarus come from the factory with V rated tires which are expensive, don't wear well, and may be overkill.

    Martin
  • krzysskrzyss Posts: 845
    I also find it easy to buy tires (I think I bought 3 or 4 sets from tirerack.com in last 10 years). It is much harder to find good installer.

    Sometimes I use tirerack price for local store to drop the price.

    Krzys

    PS Tell your local store that 300 tire can be had for 112 + S&H and see the price drop in an instant.
  • krzysskrzyss Posts: 845
    "the speed rating is the sustained speed you would need to go for the tires to blow out. It has nothing to do with pothole resistance."

    Yes you are right but...

    V rated tire must be built more robust that H rated one. It might be better to survive pothole hit as a by-product of its higher speed rating.

    BUT...

    If you hit pothole would you rather replace blown tire or bent pieces of suspension?

    Krzys
  • cptpltcptplt Posts: 1,075
    there is no sound reason why the OB/Legacy need a H rated tire unless its the 4 turbo, the reason they have V rated is that the RE92A in the stock size comes as a v. when I got my 02 WRX, they were putting V rated RE92 tires on the base Impreza too! Subaru probably just has a contract with Bridgestone for a warehouse or two full of that particular tire! Imay not go with a T rated tire but an H is fine, lets face it, half the people using snowtires are on Qs!
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I am still going to disagree on the "higher rating" meaning a stronger tire. Think of it logically, if the sidewalls are stiffer they are MORE suseptable to being destroyed by a pothole, than one with a softer more pliable one. As testament, I've gotten way more bubbles in "speed rated" tires with stiffer sidewalls than in standard regular tires. Also when offroading we purposely air-down our tires, not only to give us float over mud but to allow the tires to be far more pliable when rock-crawling. I've seen a lot of offroaders blow tires running at street pressure, whereas very rarely do you damage your tires rock crawling with aired-down tires.

    -mike
  • I have a 2008 SpecB that I thought was going to make mince meat out of the snow in Colorado. It comes with summer tires though and its the worst car I've ever owned on ice/snow. I basically have no brakes or steering whatsoever whenever I apply the slightest pressure on the brake going as slow as possible. The ABS kicks in and it basically has the handling of a sled. Will snow/all season tires help or is there another problem I'm not aware of with these cars?
    My neighbor has an old beat up Astro van that can get through the stuff my shiny new Subaru can't. What a disappointment.... Please help.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Without a doubt it is the tires.

    Summer tires are simply not useful in the snow, period. You will need a 2nd set of tires if you drive in snow.

    Or get a winter beater.

    It's the same for the EVO, STI, MazdaSpeed3, i.e. all sporty cars that come with summer tires.

    Summer tires are actually OK in the rain, but not on snow or ice. The soft compound gets rock hard. There are no sipes on the tread blocks, either.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,586
    Yep - put a set of Nokians or some other mountain-and-snowflake-rated tire on there and you will think you just bought a new car. Again. ;)
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Summer tires are not only bad in snow, they are also VERY DANGEROUS in any conditions below 40-45 degrees! It's not only the lack of sipes, but also the fact that the tires are hard as rock and plasticy below that. The compound is not made for any kind of cold weather, even dry cold weather.

    Even a set of all-seasons would help but I'd suggest the new Blizzack WS60 as a good snow tire for the car.

    -mike
  • Thanks for the advice fellas. You bet summer tires are dangerous up here. I'm in the mid 20s in temperature most of the time. I've had a couple of bad bowel-crunch moments already!
    The SpecB comes with 18" rims and I don't think they make Blizzaks in that size. Any others that come to mind?
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Personally I'd just order up some 17" tires and rims from tire rack, it's worth it to have a dedicated set of rims for snows. I've heard good things about the Dunlop Wintersport M3s but never drove on em myself.

    -mike
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,586
    Yeah, the selection of winter-rated tires drops dramatically as you hit 17" and 18" rim sizes. I imagine that will change with time, but the price is also much higher in those sizes. You should be able to get the Dunlops, Blizzaks, or Michelin X-Ice in that size. There might be a couple Goodyear Eagles available in that size as well. Nokian, a more expensive tire to start, are ungodly expensive in a 17", but are also a great tire.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • i just purchased these tires from tirerack for my 2000 outback based on what i've read here and the fact that they were a quick pick on consumer reports this month. i had them put on a few days ago and they seem very noisy. has anyone else noticed excessive humming/noise from the tires? the tires i replaced (goodrich traction t/a)were beat at 30k and one had a bad belt, so there was noise before, but i almost think these tires are louder. could something be wrong with one of them or might there be another issue? i have the car going back to the garage next week for another issue and will have them check the tires over.

    i've had more expensive tires (potenzas, goodyear triple tred assurance, and goodrich traction t/a) but none have lasted for much more than 30-40k. i drive 30k a year, so i opted to go with a cheaper tire since i seem to be replacing them every year anyway. i hope i didn't make a mistake in getting these....
    k2
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    The HTR+ are a bit louder, but they are an Ultra-high Performance All Season tire, which means it'll be a bit louder than a High Perf or Touring tire.

    Barring hearing them though there could be something wrong with the mounting/balancing though.

    -mike
  • ok, thanks! i didn't realize that the ultra high performance tires would be louder. when i have the car in the garage next week, i'll have them double check the tires just to be sure there's not another issue.
    thanks again!
    k2
  • doug22doug22 Posts: 3
    My daughter has a 98 outback with 143k that she bought from a private owner who had :surprise: replaced 2 tires with tires or similar wear but I measured the circuference of all four and measured the back 2 at 1/8" and 3/8" less than the fronts. She is experiencing an intermittent shuddering mostly while on straight road, at any speed. I thought it was a fuel or spark issue until we looked closer at the tires.

    Is this an issue? I always hear the need to replace all 4. What if I measure a new tire and find one the same size? Can I use it?
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yes, it's an issue, and yes, if 2 new tires closely match the circumference of the other 2 new-ish tires, then you can use it. Has to be within 1/4" per Subaru's spec.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,586
    Definitely a concern. The different sizes are creating additional stress in the AWD system and it will manifest itself by doing "strange" things: Tire slippage, shuddering, clutch pack wear. Sooner is better for fixing the situation.

    As for replacing with same-circumference tires, you should put a matched set on the car. Even if the tires are the same now, differences in traction and wear rates can affect the car's performance over time. As this car seems to be new to your family, you might as well reset the wear meter and hopefully reduce your expense down the road. :D
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yep, that's why I rotated tires often, usually 7500 miles or so.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Yeah for the price of new tires, I'd just get 4 of the same. These are the single most important item to keep you safely planted.

    -mike
    Motorsports and Modifications Host
  • Best all-season tire for 2000 Subaru Outback for W Coast and winter ski trips to mountains? Yokohama Avid TRZ’s?

    I’m about to purchase a 2000 Subaru Outback and it turns out on inspection that the rear and front tires were not matched for tread type or tread wear, and no more than a 2/32 difference is recommended in tire size/tread, and all tires should be matched for tread. So I will have to replace them. Planning to drive the car on the W Coast in N California after relocating now from the NE, mostly for drives of 5 to 45 min during the work week, and occasional weekend trips, including ski trips to the mountains in winter. I’m looking for a top quality all-season tire that will handle well in summer and winter conditions.

    I’d sincerely appreciate your advice as I’m very careful about tires every since I bought my first car in college, a 7 year old Volvo, which had tires that checked out well enough, but in a medium rain storm, driving 30 mph on a Cliffside with one lane in each direction, with no sudden acceleration or steering moves, the car fishtailed 180 degrees, and I was lucky to “land” the car in my lane close to the inside of the road against the mountain. Some oil leaking down from a town above the road may have caused the road to be slick, but as soon as I put brand new top end all season tires on the car, it handled 10x better and safer. Never experienced that kind of slippage again.

    In response to this question on Yahoo Answers, this poster below who owns 2 subarus recommended Yokohama Avid TRZ’s http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Yokohama&tireModel=AVID+TRZ . I checked the reviews on Tirerack and the TRZs have an average overall rating of 8.52 out of 737 reviews, which is very good.
    http://www.tirerack.com/survey/SurveyComments.jsp?additionalComments=y&tireMake=- Yokohama&tireModel=AVID+TRZ&tirePageLocQty=&commentStatus=P
    He was negative on Michelin for value and quick wear:

    “I'm not sure if they're available in Australia, but I ran Yokohama Avid TRZ's on my 98 Outback.. they have a 700 treadwear rating, and the rain/ snow traction is excellent (I know not a lot of powder down there, but in a sudden downpour, they are amazing).. I drive mostly on-road, over 60 km one-way to work, and have taken them off road on occasion.. really surprising for an all season car tire. From my experience here stateside, Michelin is way overpriced, and the treads are too soft to get any real life out of; they do handle well though. Had nothing but bad experiences with Pirellis, may be just me. I'm currently running Dunlop Dirrezas on my 07 WRX.. and they have been wonderful so far. Stick like glue, and good in the rain. They are a summer- only tire though” * 4 weeks ago Source(s): 17 years in the repair trade, employed with a national tire distributor; owner of two Subarus.

    Also, any suggestions on best place to pick tires up in the Silicon Valley area?
  • Best all-season tire for 2000 Subaru Outback for W Coast and winter ski trips to mountains? Yokohama Avid TRZ’s?

    I’m about to purchase a 2000 Subaru Outback and it turns out on inspection that the rear and front tires were not matched for tread type or tread wear, and no more than a 2/32 difference is recommended in tire size/tread, and all tires should be matched for tread. So I will have to replace them. Planning to drive the car on the W Coast in N California after relocating now from the NE, mostly for drives of 5 to 45 min during the work week, and occasional weekend trips, including ski trips to the mountains in winter. I’m looking for a top quality all-season tire that will handle well in summer and winter conditions.

    I’d sincerely appreciate your advice as I’m very careful about tires every since I bought my first car in college, a 7 year old Volvo, which had tires that checked out well enough, but in a medium rain storm, driving 30 mph on a Cliffside with one lane in each direction, with no sudden acceleration or steering moves, the car fishtailed 180 degrees, and I was lucky to “land” the car in my lane close to the inside of the road against the mountain. Some oil leaking down from a town above the road may have caused the road to be slick, but as soon as I put brand new top end all season tires on the car, it handled 10x better and safer. Never experienced that kind of slippage again.

    In response to this question on Yahoo Answers, this poster below who owns 2 subarus recommended Yokohama Avid TRZ’s http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Yokohama&tireModel=AVID+TRZ . I checked the reviews on Tirerack and the TRZs have an average overall rating of 8.52 out of 737 reviews, which is very good.
    http://www.tirerack.com/survey/SurveyComments.jsp?additionalComments=y&tireMake=- - Yokohama&tireModel=AVID+TRZ&tirePageLocQty=&commentStatus=P
    He was negative on Michelin for value and quick wear:

    “I'm not sure if they're available in Australia, but I ran Yokohama Avid TRZ's on my 98 Outback.. they have a 700 treadwear rating, and the rain/ snow traction is excellent (I know not a lot of powder down there, but in a sudden downpour, they are amazing).. I drive mostly on-road, over 60 km one-way to work, and have taken them off road on occasion.. really surprising for an all season car tire. From my experience here stateside, Michelin is way overpriced, and the treads are too soft to get any real life out of; they do handle well though. Had nothing but bad experiences with Pirellis, may be just me. I'm currently running Dunlop Dirrezas on my 07 WRX.. and they have been wonderful so far. Stick like glue, and good in the rain. They are a summer- only tire though” * 4 weeks ago Source(s): 17 years in the repair trade, employed with a national tire distributor; owner of two Subarus.

    Also, any suggestions on best place to pick tires up in the Silicon Valley area?
  • I spoke with Tirerack.com and these 2 tires were their top pics for performance + value for all-season tires for the 2000 Subaru Outback Ltd Wagon:

    Bridgestone Turanza Serenity 225/60R16 $126 H sped rated - rated for 70,000 miles, supposed to offer just a little more responsive handling and a drop quieter ride than the Yokohama Avid TRZ, thanks to the stiffer tire, rated as a grand touring tire. There are less reviews for this than for the Yokohama Avid TRZ, but it appears well rated, though winter/snow ratings appear a little lower than the Yokohama Avid TRZ. Rated to 130 mph (as if I'd drive a 2000 Subaru Outback even close to that speed).

    Yokohama Avid TRZ 225/60R16 $94 T speed rated4/ - rated for 80,000 miles - rated as a touring tire. Very large number of ratings and very highly rated, both for summer and winter conditions. Considered an excellent mix of quality and value. The Yokohama Avid TRZ also got a very good review in Yahoo Answers.

    I have to decide in 2 days (by Monday evening) in order to take advantage of a $75 rebate for four Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Tires, if I want them. The Bridgestone rebate brings the cost of a set of 4 Bridgestone Turanza Serenity very close to the cost of a set of Yokohama Avid TRZs.

    I'd sincerely appreciate your advice - I'm a first time Subaru owner and haven't had to keep a car for a few years now, so haven't bought tires in years.
  • tswitztswitz Posts: 3
    We just purchased an 08 Legacy with the Yokohama Advan A82A's on it. After 1 week I noticed a bubble on the sidewall. The Yoko dealer said it was an impact break from hitting a pothole or curb and that it wasn't covered. Long story short, I spoke to Yoko directly and received a new tire for free.

    I was wondering if anyone else has experienced this type of problem with the Yoko's? We definately didn't hit anything to cause this impact break. The car had 500 miles on it when we bought it on a dealer trade so I assume that the damage occurred before I bought it and reared its ugly head after we started driving it.

    Thanks,
    Tom
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I've had em on all different tires. Most recently RE070s, and Nokian Hakkapolita RSi.

    -mike
  • Does anyone keep having trouble with the TPS light going on. I realize it's to let me know that my tires are low, but I have had them checked several times and inflated and then it's fine...(no leak or anything?)

    Maybe it's electrical?
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Check the air pressure in the AM, when the tires are cold.

    You may be driving and heating up the tires, expanding the air and increasing the pressure to normal.

    That happened to me with my van. In fact the light would come on, then turn off once the tires warmed up. There were only very slightly below the recommended pressure when cold, but the TPMS worked like a charm.
  • robm2robm2 Posts: 53
    Check the spare - it may have a pressure monitor, as well.
This discussion has been closed.