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Subaru Legacy/Outback Oil and Other Fluid Questions

2

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  • I just bought this used Outback, 01, very clean runs great. One thing, the sprayer doesn't work on the wipers. I check the fuse- it looks good. Pulled a hose under the hood, nothing coming out, so I assume it's the "motor" or another connection. I can't seem to disconnect the two wires I see connected to this. Any thoughts on this. The fuse looked old, but it wasn't blown, that is certain.

    Thoughts??
  • It is probably the washer motor. These are pretty easy to replace. At the bottom front of the washer fluid bottle are two small motors, one for the front and one for the rear. You can tell which one is which by following the tubing leading from them.
    Remove the bottle by removing the top two bolts and freeing the assorted tubing from clamps on the side. The wires are a little difficult to pull out, but come off easier when the reservoir is lifted up. Pull the motor out and replace with the new one. It would be a good idea to replace the rubber grommet around it also. These little motors run about 40 to 60 dollars.
  • Hi, I have a 1995 Legacy AWD, I need to replace the water pump.
    Anybody have any tips to make this a smother operation. I have the service manual, it looks like quite a job. I need to get a compression gauge to set the engine at top dead center first. I'm going to change the timing belt also.
    Any thoughts would be great
    Thanks
    Dan
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    Why do you need to set the engine at TDC?

    When I replaced my water pump, at about 177,000 miles, it took about four hours to do the task. I also had assistance, but we were working in a shop with which we were unfamiliar, so finding tools took some extra effort/time. I never made any special effort to set mine to TDC, and had no problems with it any of the five times I had the timing belt off the car.

    Replace the thermostat while you are in there, and also your upper and lower radiator hoses if they are original or very old. The job is fairly straight forward, but it does take some time to dig down to the pump, put everything back together, and then refill the cooling system. Be CAREFUL with the timing cover bolts and the water pump bolts. They are small (10 mm heads?) and are not very forgiving when it comes to torque.... ;)
  • you'll save time and maintenance
  • I have a 1997 subaru legacy and I know what kind of gear oil my center differential needs but how much does it take?
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    Take a look here, and put in your vehicle information. It will give you information about all your vehicle's fluids; capacities are listed near the bottom.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Says 1.7 pints, FWIW.

    Do this - remove the top bolt FIRST, that's critical, because if you can't remove it and you drain the fluid by removing the bottom bolt only, you'll never be able to fill it with fluid again.

    Remove the bottom bolt 2nd, drain the oil in an oil drain pan.

    Replace the bottom bolt, and use a hand pump to add oil in the top hole. The stuff is thick so be ready for a little bit of work here, especially if it's cold.

    Basically buy one quart and top it off. When it begins to spill, it's full. Wipe it clean.

    Replace the top bolt, voila, you're done.

    Now go shower because your wife will hate the smell of gear oil cologne. :shades:
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I bought one that looks sort of like this at the local Pep Boys:

    image
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    Do this - remove the top bolt FIRST, that's critical, because if you can't remove it and you drain the fluid by removing the bottom bolt only, you'll never be able to fill it with fluid again.

    Remove the bottom bolt 2nd, drain the oil in an oil drain pan.

    Replace the bottom bolt, and use a hand pump to add oil in the top hole. The stuff is thick so be ready for a little bit of work here, especially if it's cold.

    Basically buy one quart and top it off. When it begins to spill, it's full. Wipe it clean.

    Replace the top bolt, voila, you're done.


    This is for the rear differential. For the front/center, there should be a dipstick, and the fluid is filled there. There is a drain in the bottom that now uses a T70 Torx fitting, though a T60 works fine, too (T70 can be tough to find!). I am not sure if the Torx was being used on your model year, but the drain plug should be pretty easy to find - between the oil pan plug and the transmission pan plug (if yours is an automatic).
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Whoops, misread that, my bad.

    Yeah, look for a yellow dipstick. Not easy to find, though.

    For that instead of the pump use a funnel with a long tube attached to it.

    It'll take far more than just one quart, also.

    The drain plug is a flat nut at the bottom of the transmission casing, IIRC I want to say it's a 17mm? Maybe bigger.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    That sounds about right. I know many late '90s and early '00s had issues with incompetent shops messing up the oil changes by draining differentials and overfilling engines. That may be the reason a Torx is used now. The engine oil pan's nut is 17mm.

    I use the pump to fill my front/center differentials as well. I have a long-neck funnel, but it is tough to access that opening, especially on newer models. When I put the synthetic 75w-90 in my 2010 Forester a couple weeks ago, there is no way I could have accessed the port with a funnel. I had to pump a gallon of gear lube by hand. Well, i think it was something like 7.9 pints, so almost a gallon, but that is for a manual transmission, so I would think the differential only needs about half of that. I'm just being lazy and not using my own link to look up the info for the OP. :P
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    LOL :D

    I used a funnel with a long plastic tube. That tube ran down to the dip stick, which is also the fill hole for gear oil on the manual trans.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    First of all there is NO fluid that is user serviceable on the CENTER DIFFY on a Subaru.

    If this is an Automatic you have Front Diffy, Rear Diffy and the Automatic Trans Fluids.

    If this is a MT, then you have Front Diffy combined with the Manual Trans Fluid and the Rear Diffy.

    Front Diffy on an AT takes less than 1 Quart, Rear takes about 1 Quart.
    Front Diffy + Manual Trans on an MT takes 3 Quarts, Rear takes about 1 Quart.

    Filling the Front Diffy on the AT is a Dipstick (the side will depend if it's a Turbo or a Non Turbo).
    Filling the Automatic Trans Fluid is a Dipstick (the side will depend if it's a Turbo or not)
    Rear Diffy on AT or MT is upper bolt on the casing itself.

    -mike
    Subaru Guru and Track Instructor
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I worked on my front diff/manual trans.
  • nv1znv1z Posts: 1
    Then what is one supposed to do if one has an issue where the suspected culprit is the center differential?

    I have a 1990 Subaru Legacy that appears to have some center differential issues. It is an AWD model, but when both front wheels OR both rear wheels are on a low-traction surface, one of the wheels on that axle spins and torque is not shifted to the other axle. In other words, both axles get torque at different times, but no shifting of torque between axles happens when it is supposed to.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    If the center differential is the problem, a transaxle rebuild is on the horizon.... :cry:
  • jim355jim355 Posts: 1
    I have a 95 outback and after a recent engine change the transmittion ( or transfer case ) started slipping and now there is fluid coming from the fill port of the transfer case and the transmittion is empty of fluid. There is a loud grinding noise when trying to drive but with the car on jack is dosent make the noise and seems to trun the wheels fine. What could it be. A bad transmittion, transfer case or torque converter?
  • 204meca204meca Posts: 366
    Any comments / experience on the pros / cons of using synthetic fluids for front & rear diffentials?
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,391
    I use synthetic 75w-90 in my Subaru(s), both front and rear differentials, and it makes for easy moving on cold mornings (0F and colder) compared to the stock fluid. I love it - the very first thing I do when I get a new Subaru is change out the differential fluid to synthetic.

    Cons? Well, my '08 Outback, with its rear LSD, chattered a little when I spun the tires, but a little slip lock cleared that right up. I only drove it 300 miles (on dry pavement) before changing the fluid, so I am not sure if the chatter would have occurred with the OEM oil.
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