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Houses cost too much!

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,648
    tell it to the poor people in foreclosure :P

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  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,958
    I have a couple of opinions on those poor souls on the Alternate Route today :shades:

    The phrase, "you reap what you sow" comes to mind

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  • okko1okko1 Posts: 327
    still watching the construction of the new one after the demolition of the old one. the builder chose the option of no basement. but did include safe room in the house. this will save much agravation in the future as this house is at the bottom of the hill. :)
  • If you get more than one Tornado warning per season, concrete basement is a good thing to consider. Would you elaborate on the safe room though?
  • Karen_CMKaren_CM Posts: 5,030
    http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/houses.htm

    I particularly like the B-52 Bungalow. :shades:

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  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,579
    This one matches your smart car better.

    I'm on the lookout for a great deal on some greenhouse fabric myself.

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  • okko1okko1 Posts: 327
    this is a room that in this area is built for storm protection. these are often included in homes as part of the basement foundation structure. and may very in size but will always have a few thing the same like 6in. thick concrete walls and will have a concrete lid or ceiling. the one in the little house currently under construction is 6ft. deep 4ft. wide. and 7ft. tall. the measurements are all from inside the box. it will be fitted with a steel door and anchored frame. these are often concealed by more attractive finishes. it will also have a fresh air supply and battery operated light. these rooms tend to vary in size this one is typical for a small patio home. if it is part of the foundation,that is to say in the basement often these will be part of a large stoop area of the front or rear porches. and maybe 20ft. long and 15ft. wide with up to a 10ft. ceiling.
  • Thank You for the detailed explanation! It was pretty interesting. My initial impression was that your safe room is not part of the basement, that's why asked. We plan to do something similar when we finish our basement, but for now it serves the purpose, having concrete walls and being under grade. We will probably put a wall protecting the safe area from the walk-out door/window. Unfortunately, concrete ceiling is, from my understanding, a pretty difficult/expensive option at this point, so we should hope the I-beams hold if the worst happens.
    And, of course, our next house will be brick, although that's pretty rare here. And quite expensive.
  • jipsterjipster Posts: 5,345
    And quite expensive(brick)

    I recall "build with brick" radio commercials several years ago saying it was only 5% more expensive to build with brick. Maybe, they were speaking of the actual building materials and not including labor?
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,958
    Don't you just love advertising?? :confuse:

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  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,599
    When house shopping, we saw a couple of houses with brick foundations. The condition those foundations were in convinced me that building with brick is NOT a good idea.

    Although, I should point out these were old houses and maybe brick manufacturing has come a long way since then and the bricks last forever(?).

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  • jipsterjipster Posts: 5,345
    I'd say building with brick good idea.... building with brick foundation bad idea. :sick:
  • okko1okko1 Posts: 327
    block maybe on 8in. footing . the walls are up on the little house. starting to look a little long and skinny but ya do the best ya can with what ya have to work with.
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 6,767
    I'm in upstate NY near Albany and we haven't seen any of the wild swings of other parts of the country. We don't go up 50% a year but we don't have the crash either.

    I bought my little farm in 1981 for $3000 an acre. Beautiful views of the Hudson valley with miles of forever wild land next to us. 8 minutes to downtown Albany and only 2 red lights between us and New York City.

    We couldn't afford the $45K that custom built homes were going for so we built the house ourselves.

    Our land is now worth about 60-100K an acre. Developers and our rich neighbor are fighting over who will pay us more.

    I still remember worrying that we would never get our 3K an acre back if we had to sell.

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  • tpulaktpulak Posts: 43
    Man! half a million dollars for 1050 sq. ft?1! Whoa, that is so expensive!! In my place(Dallas , Texas) you can get a 3,200 2-story home for as low as $320,000. I know a friend of mine, he owns a 4,600 square foot home, that cost him only around $560,000 . And these are all new homes I am talking about. But and old home(around 1980's) that has 2,600 sqare feet(1-story) costs only about $100,00- $130,000 max. And I thought I was was one of the lonely buyers paying to much for their house! :)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,164
    I couldn't get a garden shed behind a crack house in my area for 130K. 320K might get a decent condo, but nothing too fancy.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,648
    The cheapest, shoddiest, smallest, most run-down pile of rotten boards in my town costs $650,000. It's absolutely ludicrous. There aren't even any listings for less than that aside from mobile homes and condos. A tennsy-weensy condo might cost you $325K.

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  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 30,479
    Nowadays, a "brick" house just has brick siding... In most cases, it's just an outer layer, no different than having vinyl siding. It lends no structural support to the house. If done well, it may offer some extra protection from wind, etc., and it will certainly add resale value and aesthetic appeal, but it means very little structurally.

    The 5% extra cost? That is 5% more for the whole house... If you are factoring in just the cost of siding the house... that portion of the job.. then the percentage difference is a whole lot more..

    regards,
    kyfdx

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,164
    In many cases I see it only on the front of the house, too. Face brick is kind of uncool, although it looks better than vinyl or cheap composite clapboard. I bet it can be an issue in areas where the ground shifts or there are earthquakes. Houses sure are built cheap these days....cardboard 'n plywood.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,164
    A co-worker recently bought a 2400sq ft 1970s split in a decent area of a dreary suburb for 350K...but...on bad mornings it can easily be a 2+ hour commute each way. I know the market has cooled a little here, but it has a ways to go.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,648
    That's a rough commute. It's gonna get old real fast, poor guy.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,164
    The worst part is that the 2 hours will cover less than 20 miles. I'll keep my 10 minute commute and deal with living in an apartment, while awaiting the condo market to correct itself (already in my area condo conversions are being rented out again, as they couldn't sell)
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganPosts: 13,989
    Jeeze fintail, how do you guys afford it ? Does everybody in Washington State, make six figures a year ????? :surprise: I drove 91 miles one way for 3 years plus worked a 13 hour shift. I come back to Michigan, and places I thought took a long time to get to at times are like a hop, skip and a jump now.

    So yeah that 2 hour drive will get very old.... trust me !!!!! ;)

    -Rocky
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,164
    People either work multiple jobs, rent out rooms, deal with a long commute, or live in a apt/condo. Of course, those who are old enough to have bought 15-20+ years ago don't face the same mess...and many of them arrogantly act like some kind of tycoon because they were around then and bought cheap. The market here is just starting to go soft, as it has in so many other areas. I was looking at a couple of condos in the summer of 06 - one of them is still on the market, for 40K less! And apartment conversions to condos are going back to rentals. Serves the speculators right.

    I have a 10-15 min commute, and that is enough for me. Driving here is only tolerable on Sundays. I'll live in a smaller place to not spend 100 hours per month in crawling traffic.
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganPosts: 13,989
    Hey man I totally agree with the way you feel. ;) It still puzzles me how "our" generation is suppose to afford these meager homes that are several hundred thousand dollars. I guess at some point they will come out with generation loans to spike the housing market again where you can sign your kids and grandkids up as a promisary to pay the remaining balance owed. :P

    -Rocky
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,164
    I'm waiting for the 100 year mortgage. We're already halfway there!

    Once the boomers are gone, the housing market will be a bit different, as real incomes are not increasing as they did for so long, and few people will have been able to buy cheap. The only thing that might keep housing going is that so many are built so cheaply and poorly today that they will be teardowns in 25-30 years, and that will require replacement...of course, with another cardboard 'n plywood dream house.
  • rockyleerockylee Wyoming, MichiganPosts: 13,989
    Yeah they don't build em' like they use too.

    My 3x great grandfather's house he built in the mid 1800's in Larvik, Norway looks as good as new. ;) Try to say that about a home built today 150 years from now and well it be there anymore because like you said cardboard 'n plywood only lasts so long, eh ???? ;)

    -Rocky
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 30,479
    You can still build a good house out of plywood and cardboard..

    The important things are a good foundation, and keeping things dry... Given those two things are done correctly, almost any house will last a hundred years...

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,164
    From my experience, the quality of housing in northern Europe far exceeds the average seen on this continent. It's also a reason why they don't have such a huge housebuilding industry - people simply renovate existing structures as needed, instead of buying something disposable and moving on when it is worn out. Even houses from the 50s here seem to be better built than newer ones.

    As was mentioned, cardboard and plywood can be workable if built properly...but I don't know if many will build properly to begin with when using low grade materials. I see a lot of 70s-80s developments in my area that are really beginning to look ragged, and it is more than cosmetic neglect - the houses were just built as cheaply as possible.
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,958
    Sorry guys. Making poor financial decisions is a personal problem and not some conspiracy.

    When we built our home back in 1986 it was NOT cheap as far as we were concerned, and adjustable rate mortgages were waving their seductive charms in our face just like now. I didn't take the bait then because of what COULD happen.

    Are there people hurting now? Certainly. And they certainly seem to find themselves in a cleft stick of their own making. You can't budget your finanaces and want to live beyond your means? Don't cry to me when YOUR bills come due and you didn't have the foresight to plan on how you were going to pay them.

    We had a "woe is me" front page story here about a guy having to file bankruptcy because of the amount he has out on credit cards. He put his kid's college tuition on a credit card. And now he's surprised he's in a finacial hole and expecting someone else to bail him out or feel sorry for him?
    I'd love to have a plasma HDTV too. Where's the line of people who are gonna pay for that for me?

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