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Toyota Camry: Problems & Solutions

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Comments

  • Certainly doesn't sound right to me, but I am not a mechanic. Personally I would take it back and compare with others on the lot. If it is the exhaust system, then it does get hot and can show rust much earlier than just about any other part. But for a new delivery item, I would certainly check it out.
  • user777user777 Posts: 3,341
    i believe that would be part of your exhaust manifold assembly (you got a 4 cylinder vehicle?), perhaps you are looking at a heat shield, and the thing that looks like a "spark plug", probably an O2 sensor to determine if the vehicle is properly burning the fuel post-combustion (by taking measurements from the combustion gases on their way to the Catalytic Convertor and the muffler).

    in that location, i would imagine you'd have on the metal, some blueing or slight discoloration due to heating after the vehicle is driven some. not owning or seeing the vehicle, it's hard to say what you are looking at exactly. are there any other signs of rust on any metal structures surrounding the engine?
  • pxkpxk Posts: 1
    I brought mine in August 2005. In the warm weather I get 28 miles to the gal. Was expecting the 34 listed. Was told it is a larger engine and that 28 was good. I lve in New England and with the cold weather I'm getting 25 mpg now. Anyone else getting the EPA recomeded mpg.

    Thanks.
  • I have a 1998 4 cylinder Camry LE - 134,000 miles - I recently changed the spark plugs and noticed that oil is leaking into the #1 cylinder (I noticed it for about the last 50-60,000 miles. Now the engine is burning an extra quart of oil between oil changes. The engine seems to run smooth, though.

    I think it's either the valve guides or piston rings in this cylinder. Does anyone have an estimate as to how much it would cost to install new piston rings and/or valve guides on a single cylinder?

    Thanks in advance,

    Hoosier

    Thanks
  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    This is the exhaust manifold, and as part of the exhaust system, it's made of steel and can't be painted because of the extreme heat. It will tend to show surface rust early, but this is nothing to worry about. The part should easily last the lifetime of the car.
  • Yes, it is the exhaust heat shield. It is discolored and has rust on it. It is brand new 2006 camry v4 with 9 miles on the odometer. Everything else under the hood is fine. And it runs fine. But why the rust? What do I do?

    thanks
  • Thanks for your post, it came up just before I posted reply to older message. so it tends to show surface rust early. Do they clean it every couple of months or so?

    thanks
  • I am used to having a Ford vehicle with the numbered keypad on the driver's door. I could start the car to warm it up, lock it and shut the door, and then open it with the keypad. Now I have an '05 Camry and I really miss this feature. Sometimes I like to warm the car up, but I never want to leave it unattended with the keys in it. I tried to lock the car when I got out with it running, but I couldn't. Then I went and got my spare keys and tried to lock it with them, but no luck. Does anyone know if there's a way to do this?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,930
    Latest news from the Detroit Auto Show on the new lineup of Camrys, right here at the Edmunds blogs:

    http://blogs.edmunds.com/.ee8e56c

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • wwestwwest Posts: 10,706
    Use the driver door lockset once all the doors are closed.
  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    Despite what wwest reported above, I don't think there is a way to lock the doors with the key still in the ignition, whether the car is running or not. The purpose, obviously, is to minimize the likelihood of locking yourself out of the car. (Of course, if you leave your keys OUT of the ignition, but on the seat or console, you can lock yourself out.)

    The dealer MIGHT be able to disable the feature, but I know of no way to do it yourself. If you do have it disabled, I'd recommend always having a spare key in your pocket or purse.
  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    Despite what wwest reported above, I don't think there is a way to lock the doors with the key still in the ignition, whether the car is running or not. The purpose, obviously, is to minimize the likelihood of locking yourself out of the car. (Of course, if you leave your keys OUT of the ignition, but on the seat or console, you can lock yourself out.)

    The dealer MIGHT be able to disable the feature, but I know of no way to do it yourself. If you do have it disabled, I'd recommend always having a spare key in your pocket or purse.
  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    Despite what wwest reported above, I don't think there is a way to lock the doors with the key still in the ignition, whether the car is running or not. The purpose, obviously, is to minimize the likelihood of locking yourself out of the car. (Of course, if you leave your keys OUT of the ignition, but on the seat or console, you can lock yourself out.)

    The dealer MIGHT be able to disable the feature, but I know of no way to do it yourself. If you do have it disabled, I'd recommend always having a spare key in your pocket or purse.
  • Suggest you don't go to Toyo dealer for your problem-they will only install toyo brakes.
    Go to a good mechanic and have him[or her]install Carbon Ceramic brake pads.NAPA has them.
    They don't squeak and are quiet and have minimal dusting.
    I have 2 '96 Camrys and would never install Toyota brakes.
  • I'm betting if you used a spare key to lock the door after hopping out, it'll stay locked (that's the same as locking with you on the inside, which you can definitely do).
    However, I'd bet that any "electronic" method (button, key fob, etc) would not allow you to lock the door, for the previously mentioned reason of minimizing the risk of locking yourself out.
    Of course, now you need to carry two keys around.

    Brad.
  • mmattmmatt Posts: 5
    Did you get this running? Mine just did the same thing!
    Thanks,
    M
  • mmattmmatt Posts: 5
    Car ran fine yesterday then I washed the motor. It ran fine so I parked it. When I got into it the next day. It started fine for aprox 3 min then it died and has not ran since. There is no blown fuses. I am not getting any spark. I installed new wires and plugs since but still no go. I'm gonna buy a cap and rotor tonight.
  • mmattmmatt Posts: 5
    Peter Pan,
    Mine is doing the exact same thing! I'll try the coil tonight!
  • Alright, enough of the personal issues, let's get back to the real problem at hand - our cars hesitate & jerk. Toyota accepts it as "normal", it is status quo for them and they don't appear to have any intentions of fixing it or changing it. We all agree that the problem seems to be with the 3.3L V6 5-speed automatic and the drive-by-wire "technology", although, how they can call it technology when it doesn't work better than the old method is beyond me. Hesitation wasn't acceptable 30 years ago, so I can't understand why it is OK now. Toyota doesn't care, it is status quo for them. I don't like the feeling of slogging through mud when I accelerate or the herky-jerky shift changes where the computer just can't make up its mind what gear it wants to be in. :lemon:
  • I have an '02 4 cylinder Solara. I took the car to an independent for a fuel injection cleaning & now have a check engine light on which they say is a P0420 code for the catalytic converter performing below threshhold. I had the catalytic converter replaced at 50,000 miles while still under warranty. The car is now at 105,000. I was just wondering if faulty fuel injection servicing can cause these issues. The check engine light appeared about 3 days or so after cleaning. Any input appreciated!
  • wwestwwest Posts: 10,706
    Worth a try.........??

    For those of you having hesitation problems you might try applying a (VERY) light touch with your left foot to the brake in instances where you foresee the possibility of a quick return to "acceleration" mode.

    The 2004 RX330 Lexus shop manual indicates that the transaxle will drop out of O/D the instant the brakes are applied. So just maybe it might prevent the upshifting of the transaxle during brief periods of coastdown.

    The engine/transaxle ECU firmware appears to be sensing that the driver wishes to go into cruise mode when the gas pedal is released or slightly released (coastdown..) and therefore it quickly upshifts to attain the best fuel economy.

    If instead you "apply" the brakes the ECU firmware is more likely to assume your wish is NOT to enter cruise mode but to slow the vehicle. It might therefore leave you in the current gear or maybe even downshift.
  • mmattmmatt Posts: 5
    Peter Pan,
    Thanks!! I bought a $40 Coil at AutoZone (instock) and a cap & rotor while there and it started right up!! Thank you thank you thank you! Car purrrrs like a kitten again!! This is my first Camry and my favorite body style too. I've had 6 Hondas (all very good cars) but I think this Camry is my favorite! Roomy, quite, decent performance, and good gas mileage too.
  • How do I get the radio identification number? I have the "type 3" radio in a 2006 camry se. The manual says select channel 000. How is this accomplished?
  • scoti1scoti1 Posts: 676
    Edmunds set a new forum for discussing this problem. Not much activity yet, but it is a good place to open and entertain this discussion.

    http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.efe9615
  • haefrhaefr Posts: 600
    "I recently changed the spark plugs and noticed that oil is leaking into the #1 cylinder (I noticed it for about the last 50-60,000 miles."

    I wouldn't jump the gun about re-ringing. There may be some sealing issues with the old sparkplug that came out of that cylinder - especially if it hadn't been properly torqued in the first place. The tube into which the sparkplugs are inserted are sealed from the cylinder head's oil flow by rubber O-rings. At that mileage, one or more of those O-rings may have failed. Assuming the worst, though, no ethical mechanic would install new piston rings on just one piston, nor would he/she install new valve guides and valve guide seals for just one cylinder. If it's happening on one cylinder that you can observe, it's happening on the rest, though it isn't obvious, yet. New piston rings won't seat properly against a glazed cylinder wall, either, so the cylinders would have to be re-honed at a minimum. If wear is sufficient, the cylinders would have to be re-bored oversize and new pistons and rings installed. In short, you may have a minor problem that can be solved in one afternoon in your garage, or you may have a major problem. If you have a trusted mechanic, consult him.
  • just recently my 2002 camry se was jerkying on acceleration..and the check engine light came on, i've got it diagnoise and the code was po770..shift silonoid e was the prob, but also i've check the transmission fluid and the fluid was a nice color red...the way it should be.right? but aways i've took it to the shop and they said that not only the silonoid e was bad but also the fluid was brown and black...?? so i would need a whole new transmission....how could this be..ive just check it fluid before i took the car to the shop and it was fine...are they trying to rip me off in buying a new transmission? or should i just get the silonoid fix and forget about it...something sounds fishe...someone please i need advise
  • My 98 Toyota Camry sputters / hesitates when driving with constant gas at low speeds - especially around 40 mph. The car runs fine in idle, park, when coasting, when accelerating, and at higher speeds (60 or over). Dealer thought it was the spark plugs, but we got those changed and it didn't make a difference. Any ideas what could be causing sputtering like this?
  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    I meant to reply sooner.

    I looked at my Camry's 4-cylinder engine. It occurred to me that your heat shield covering the exhaust manifold might be missing entirely. This is a thin, shiny steel plate that serves as a kind of "guard" to prevent you from touching the hot exhaust manifold. Of course, the heat shield gets hot also, but not as hot as the manifold itself.

    You mentioned seeing 4 pipes merging into one, but this is not easily discernible with the heat shield in place.

    I'd check other Camrys at the dealer to see if yours is in fact missing the shield. It should be no problem under the warranty to install one if in fact yours is missing.

    The rust on the exhaust manifold is okay -- it's just on the surface and generally won't cause any problems for the life of the car.
  • user777user777 Posts: 3,341
    You mentioned seeing 4 pipes merging into one, but this is not easily discernible with the heat shield in place.

    good point. i can't remember if you can actually see the pipes exiting the cylinders, but they converge into one, and i thought that happened in the area covered by the shield. but, this was what i remember seeing on '03s. perhaps it's changed since then?
  • Hello, just purchased a 2002 solara V6 with 25K on it. I am hearing a whining noise that appears to be coming from the rear of the vehicle. It goes up and down with speed, almost like a manual tranmission would sound in gear, but not nearly as loud. I can hear the engine and it is not that. The only other thing I could think of was a wheel bearing, but since this is coming from the rear of the car and those wheels do not move, steering to hear for a difference in sound will not help. Any ideas/similar problems?? Thanks, Jason
This discussion has been closed.