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Subaru Crew - Cleaning Interior & Exterior Surfaces

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Comments

  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yep, and those wheels/tires do a good job filling up the wheel well.

    What tires are those? Seems like the tread width nearly matches the section width.
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,733
    Oh man, I'm going to have to send back that expensive mail-order engineering degree if I keep this stuff up. September 2001 to September 2010 is 9 years old, not 8!
    I realized this when I was suddenly wondering how my average annual had suddenly jumped up to 10k??? It is really 9k per year!

    The wheels are Tire House Sports Edition Fox 5 (made by Fomb in Italy). Inexpensive, yet they look nice and have held up beautifully. That is actually my winter package, with Dunlop Wintersport M2 tires. The tread is insufficient for another winter, so I decided to burn them off over the summer. Trouble is, with my low annual mileage, that could take forever! Come November, I'll go shopping for snows again.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,524
    Here I go on a horrid tangent, but I just purchased new winter tires for my Escort today. It came with some studded tires, but I find those to be absolutely horrible in the winter - barely better than your average all-season, if that. I think part of the problem is that they are old (manufacture date is 2002, if I recall correctly), so the rubber just can't handle the cold and remain soft.

    Given that this is my $800 beater, I didn't want to splurge for the best possible winter tire (in terms of expense). I decided to go with the Continental ExtremeWinterContact (185/65R14). The problem is that I made this decision before seeing what was available locally (which is pretty much just those crappy studs I already have, and Blizzak WS-60). So, after much ado, I was finally able to get a local company to order them in for me at $370 ($30 cheaper than ordering off TireRack, delivered). After I get them mounted, I will be in for nearly $450, but I expect they should last me the life of the car unless I decide to be a real glutton for punishment and keep the sorry thing for more than another four years!
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,733
    Actually, I put those (Continental ExtremeWinterContact) on my wife's Honda Odyssey last year, and was thinking about going with them on the OBW this winter. If you didn't see it, CR did a winter tire test last November (?). The Conti was not absolutely outstanding as a snow tire, but seemed to be very balanced. Given that we can a weeks of dry roads, followed by a drenching rain, heavy snow or ice event, it is important not to go over the top on snow traction only to totally give up wet braking, for instance. You might feel different given that you drive on hard pack for weeks at a time. TR's review of winter tires also gave the Conti high marks. Plus, it was cheap compared to some of the other tires out there.

    Her last snows were on garbage steel wheels. They rode badly (difficult even with a roadforce balancer to get right), so I ordered them on new alloys. Tire Rack Sports Edition F7 this time. Only now they are made in China, and not finished as nicely as the Italian wheels from years back.

    Let me know if you cannot find the CR article, and I'll search for it. It's around the house somewhere.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,524
    Yeah, most of the driving here is in "ice" conditions for about six months straight. Snow events, while common, are typically very light (1 to 3 inches). The Ultra Grip Ice tires on my Forester are absolutely fantastic on all surfaces, especially deep snow, but are also more expensive than the Continental. Since I never take the Escort off true roads, I figure there are very few times I will need that extra capability the Goodyear might give me. And, since winter tires are a "new thing" for me, I am open to trying out different brands to see what works best and when. Granted, my cars are night and day different in terms of their base capabilities, but the same tire is not the best for all situations, either! :)

    ---------------

    That said and put to bed, I seem to have some sort of nasty residue all over the sides of my Forester. I cannot tell it is there until I start scrubbing the car, but once I have cleaned it, the surface is very tacky. Try as I might, I cannot seem to get it off. I thought maybe it was sap or something falling from above, but the hood, roof, etc., is fine... the only problem is along the sides. Any thoughts as to what it may be or how I can remove it?
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,733
    edited September 2010
    Something your friend Sara left on the roads? (modicons don't seem to be working...) I'd start by stealing a bit of your wife's nail polish remover, basically watered down acetone. It's a great general purpose solvent that works on a variety of gunk. Follow by rinsing well and some fresh wax as it will strip it all in the process.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,524
    Thanks, Steve; I'll give it a shot if I get around to washing cars again before winter sets in.... only a month away now! :surprise:
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,733
    Winter.... now that's a nasty thought.

    We've had one of the warmest summers on record, on the heals of last summer which was the second coldest. Frankly, I was in my element this year. Coupled with a lighter lab workload this year, I was able to do more swimming with the kids, and made great strides in landscaping. Yesterday I took the trailer and got another yard of mulch (free from the town - poison ivy and all...) for the distant beds that I'm making. We still had 90+ last week, mid 80's this week. The thought of winter saddens me.
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,733
    I'm a pretty avid cyclist, and was looking for a better way to transport my various bicycles. The folder is great for short road trips and is always with me, but getting the others around requires putting the hitch rack on. The thought of an 'ever present' roof rack was attractive, but I wasn't sure I could deal with one. And depending on the features, it can be an expensive investment.

    Fortunately, a Subaru OEM E3610AS802 (Yakima LockJaw) came up on Craigslist last week. I had to add $22 worth of aero crossbar brackets E361SXA100 from my Subi dealer, but it was still a relatively cheap experiment for a unit in near mint condition.

    Turns out I'm not a rooftop kind of guy. Last night I experimented with one of my 'expendable' bikes of average weight. Maybe 10 years ago I could, but I struggled with the weight and poor leverage over my head semi-onehanded while trying to lock it in place. It scared the c*&p out of me that I'd lose control when tired. I guess it's going back up on Craigslist, and I'll instead look for a nicer hitch unit.

    imageSee more Car Pictures at CarSpace.com

    imageSee more Car Pictures at CarSpace.com
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,524
    Or, you could spring for a carbon fiber road bike that weighs around 25#. :shades:
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,733
    The catch is that you cannot use this kind of rack with carbon, as you are likely to crush the downtube in the jaws. Steel, Aluminum or Titanium only.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,524
    Bah. Get rid of it. :mad:
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • gmginsfogmginsfo San Diego, CAPosts: 113
    Hey, nice pix! That bike trail in the lower one looks awfully inviting! Agree re: no roof racks. Much easier, quieter, efficient, and safe to load the bike into the rear. Besides, I kind of like the wheel's spinning and clicking along as it sometimes does. You've got a nice drive, now have a good ride!
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,733
    I didn't pick up on your comment for a while. That 'bike trail' is the lower part of my driveway! I have about 500 ft of blacktop from house to road. Sufficient for riding up and down with my little one, but unfortunately the real road is totally unsuitable for bicycling. It is a steep hill with no shoulders. We have to rack up the bikes and travel to do any kind of family cycling.
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,925
    edited May 2012
    Wow long time since somebody posted in this thread.

    Any ways all the long term members know how anal I am about keeping my car clean. I have always washed and waxed regularly. I have always been skeptical though of the hard-core detailers, how much better could they get the paint than what I have been doing, my car always looked great I thought.
    However I decided to buy a Porter Cable Random orbit buffer and in the interests of proving I could do just as good job by hand, I assembled all the products needed to do a four step process.
    First I washed the car with dawn soap, to remove all wax, then I clay barred the paint, first smack in the gob, you would think after washing the car it would be clean, WRONG, after claying the clay bar was black with dirt , I skipped the swirl removal process as I didn't have any swirls.

    I power buffed it out with Optimum Poly seal, and then waxed with Meguirs Ultimate wax, all I can say is WOW! I am now a believer, what I thought was shiny before ,is almost dull in comparison to the paint now.
    The shine is so deep you would almost be tempted to try go for a swim in it.
    The Poly seal is mildly abrasive so all the minor scratches are removed in the process.
    This is on a silver car which is hard to have a really deep shine on.

    I don't know how to post pictures here now, I have tried adding links from tinypics but all I get here is a red X. I don't why it is so difficult on this site every other site I just post the link and the picture shows up. However even the pictures do not do the result justice.

    Cheers Pat.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Sounds cool, Pat.

    Any advice for a water stain on the hood of my Miata? Not even sure how it got there, but the paint is dull in a one foot square area, shiny everywhere else.

    Waxing only helps temporarily.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,524
    I kneel down before your greatness, Pat!

    I picked up a clay bar last summer to try and deal with a problem spot on my '10 Forester, and after working on just that one area, I don't know how anyone could have the stamina to do a whole car with one of those things, let alone all the other work in that 4-step-process you detailed.

    I feel like i am doing well if I can get a single wash/wax cycle in per year. :sick:
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    My minivan gets rinsed every time it rains.

    Actually, even less than that. It's under a car port.

    It gets rinsed when it rains and I'm out driving. ;)
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,925
    juice, you could try Meguiars Ultimate Compound. Now I know in the bad old days compound and clear coat did not go together. But the Meguiars is clear coat safe. If it is only a small area you can do it by hand. Buff it out then wax. Hopefully that should take care of it. You do need a bit of elbow grease to buff it by hand.

    Cheers Pat.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I need to go get some.

    Had luck with their other products in the past.
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,925
    Actually this is my way of unwinding, so I don't look on it as a chore. Different strokes for different folks.

    Cheers Pat.
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,925
    edited June 2012
    Actually clay bar is misunderstood, it will not remove imperfections. It will however remove dirt and contaminants in the paint like rail dust, and brake dust. It will also take care of over spray.

    You don't have to lay into it hard either, this is another misconception, you don't rub until your arm falls off, you spray a lube like a quick detailer, and then rub the clay lightly over the paint.

    If you are doing it right you can actually feel the clay grabbing the dirt particles. and you won't be worn out in the process.
    You will actually like me, be amazed at how dirty the clay gets even after starting with a freshly washed car.
    As a test do one side of a hood and then feel the difference by rubbing your hand over it, the clayed half it should feel much slicker than the untreated half.

    Cheers Pat.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,524
    I was trying to use it to remove some sort of resin-like substance from the surface of the paint. I don't know where it came from, but it was spattered on one portion of the rear quarter, just above the driver side rear wheel. I never noticed it until I washed it, then it was dull and sticky to the touch. After a few days, the stickiness was gone due to dust and whatnot adhering to it, making it look dirty. Once the rest of the car caught up (in dirtiness), you wouldn't know it was even there until the next washing.

    I scrubbed until my elbow was noodly, but, whatever it is, it is impervious to cleaning attempts. The clay bar had no effect either, though it did, as you noted, make the surrounding area smooth as a baby's rear.

    I actually didn't wax the car last summer due to that spot, but I really would like to get it done this year.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,925
    When I get crap like that, I usually wash the area with a strong solution of dawn dishwasher liquid or some other brand if that is not available, then just use a little laquer thinners on a rag. Since the clear coat is a urathane formula, laquer thinners won't harm it as long as you don't go nuts with it.

    After you clean be sure to wax.

    Cheers Pat.
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