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2008 Hyundai Elantra

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Comments

  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    There will be no general action (e.g. recall) taken until: 1) the problem is pinpointed, 2) they know which cars are affected, and 3) the parts are available to fix the problem. If it is a faulty fuel pump, it's very possible that only a fraction of the current-gen Elantras are affected. It would do little good to recall all current-gen Elantras if only a few are affected.
  • I just came out of a Toyota Tacoma recall. I found the Toyota forum and a yr ago people were reporting what was happening to their trucks. It ended up with Toyota Tacomas 1995 - 2000 getting recalled and all being checked at the dealers. They even knew which vin #s were affected. The letters are still going out. And my 1997 almost mint condtion Taco was affected. The frame was soft and getting holes in strategic areas of importance.

    And I had been posting over there in that forum and when hubby's car had the problem I found this forum. Now considering that forum was posting for 8 months before Toyota did anything.....well... I wouldn't doubt Hyundai is trying to narrow down vin #s to send letters out to. My truck was actually bought off me at 150% of the KBB value of what a dealer would sell it for in excellant condition so Toyota could take it back and crush it. Their letter read 183,000 trucks affected.

    So, I bought my Elantra with the check from Toyota. I know there is a problem, I know hubby almost got killed. But I just want to see anyone with a fuel pump get it fixed before someone gets killed. I love my Elantra. I am very happy with the mileage, the room and the price.

    Kinda crappy that I lost my truck that never had a engine problem and bought something I have to worry about. But after being thru a recall where I lost my paid off vehicle of 11 yrs, this fuel pump thing is an annoying factor because I have to worry everytime I go someplace am I going to break down.

    I think Hyunda should have enough data by now to know approx. what vehicles are affected to have them brought in to the dealer and checked.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    Not sure what you mean by "check" them. IMO, the only action that can be taken once the problem is pinpointed (e.g. a faulty batch of fuel pumps) and the affected cars are identified (e.g. a range of manufacture dates, or VINs) is to notify those owners to bring their cars in ASAP and replace the fuel pumps. By the time they pull the pump out of the fuel tank, they might as well replace the pump rather than try to determine if there's something wrong with it, or something will go wrong with it.

    As to how much data Hyundai has and whether it's enough for them and the NHTSA to announce the action plan... well, I wouldn't presume to know more than they do at this point. They probably have info you and I are not privy to.
  • I will be buying a car this week and don't know which one to get. I might be able to get an Elantra for $16,000 with the leather package. The Fits are running about the same price. I am not sure about the Corolla...probably 19,000.

    I am also wondering when the new Elantras are coming out and if they are going to do deep discounts on the 08's. The problem is, I need one now.

    Consumer Reports highly recommends the Elantra, but it seems like the Toyota lines have been steady through the years.

    Help! Any ideas/suggestions/tips?
  • Not sure what you mean by "check" them. IMO, the only action that can be taken once the problem is pinpointed (e.g. a faulty batch of fuel pumps) and the affected cars are identified (e.g. a range of manufacture dates, or VINs) is to notify those owners to bring their cars in ASAP and replace the fuel pumps. By the time they pull the pump out of the fuel tank, they might as well replace the pump rather than try to determine if there's something wrong with it, or something will go wrong with it.

    As to how much data Hyundai has and whether it's enough for them and the NHTSA to announce the action plan... well, I wouldn't presume to know more than they do at this point. They probably have info you and I are not privy to.

    As I posted before, I believe it is up to the 2008 Elantra owners to call Hyundai to express their concern about the faulty fuel pump, even if you don't have a problem now. Tell them "do you know how disconcerting it is to be driving a vehicle with a known safety investigation open, with the potential failure of my vehicle being raw data for said investigation?" If we express our concerns appropriately it will hopefully do some good, at least letting Hyundai know that it's customers are paying attention.

    Can we do a roll call of who called and experiences with the corporate office?

    Drive safely and keep a lookout for the check engine light!
  • IMO, Elantra is the better all-around car with more features and space for the money. Hondas hold their value better. Be mindful of the current safety investigation regarding the fuel system. Check out the reviews of each car you're interested in and don't be afraid to ask the dealer to take one out overnight or a few hours. The 2009 Fit should be out later this year, you may want to wait. But the 2008 Elantra should be well discounted (especially the GLS). Call your dealer to see when the 2009s are out.
  • Can we do a roll call of who called and experiences with the corporate office?

    Me.... I have a case number due to my car being sluggish under 25 miles an hour. And they gave me the case number, told me to keep it and have the car hooked up to the diagnostics at the dealer who of course said....nothing wrong. I don't believe them. And like you said before.... I think they recalbirated it too now as it was fine for almost a week after I took it to the dealer and now it is starting in again.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    The Elantra (and Corolla) and the Fit are totally different kinds cars. So the first question you need to ask yourself is, do I need a hatchback/wagon or is a sedan OK? That question alone could steer you to the Fit (although the Matrix is another option).

    One big advantage the Elantra (SE only) and Corolla have over the Fit IMO is that electronic stability control is available (standard on the SE). VSA will be available on the highest-level trim of the 2009 Fit (Sport with nav), if you don't mind paying close to $19k + T&L for a Fit.

    The Corolla with leather will probably cost more than $19k + T&L. A fairly spartan LE is over $18k, and big discounts are hard to come by due to $4 a gallon gas.

    If you are looking for a good all-around car at the lowest price, and you don't need a hatchback or ESC, then the 2008 Elantra GLS would be your best bet. Some dealers (e.g. Towne Hyundai) are selling automatics with PEP for around $13k + T&L with the $1500 rebate. If you can find an SE with leather for around $16k + T&L, I think that is a good deal at this time, considering how popular the SEs are.

    Have you driven all these cars yet? You might be able to decide just from a long test drive in each car. The Elantra and Corolla have some similarities in ride, but the Fit is much different.
  • ez888ez888 Posts: 39
    i've driven in all 3 and still like the elantra the best. as others have said, corolla and elantra are quite similar; however, elantra has more room inside, drives smoother, and has better options at a cheaper price.

    the fit is a total different type of a car. they are nice; however, pricier- my friend bought one 3 weeks ago and no dealer in the chicagoland area would go under sticker price since they're a hot commodity. my friend also owns a new nissan versa and he likes that better than the fit- says it is more comfortable and drives better.
  • Hi,

    Hmm...that's a biggie question...three pretty good cars, but Hundyai is still new to being considered with Honda and Toyota--yes consumer reports came out with the glowing report....

    but so much of what goes into this also depends on who you are and what you want.

    Some of my friends still warn to stay clear of the Hundyai, but I'm uncertain myself.

    When you say now, do you mean like "yesterday"? Cause I believe the new Honda Fit's are due out end of Sept (?) and the new Elantra's I don't know when...

    I'd recommend to read the various forums--great info..

    If you go over to the Elantra '08 forum, you will find many fuel pump problems are arising from the 08's...this is not to say yours would have this, of course--but they are happening at an alarming rate and to date no recall issued--a true safety concern. Yes, it has a long warranty, but maybe that's cause you'll need it! (?)

    I think Honda Fit (go to that forum too) is awesome if you can deal with no armrest and no seat height adjustment. The "09 will be even better and with armrest but no height adjustment..If you are short, the Fit actually 'fits' better than if you are tall, IMO--and you can just toss in a comfy cushion to raise you higher.

    But if you are tall, or anticipate tall people driving, this could be a problem.

    I just love hatchbacks, to throw all my stuff in-- and Honda is a great solid company. But that's me--maybe not you at all.

    But you need to ask yourself what is most important to you?

    Safety? Price? Resale? Comfort? Hatchback? Color choices?

    MPG: they all are around the same, I think--but you can research this at
    http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/ratings2008.shtml
    click on "Find and compare cars"

    And you need to test drive all three carefully--pay attention to comfort and
    other things and try to imagine if you would be comfortable with the car for the
    next 3-5 years...

    I found the 'O9 Corolla overpriced and lackluster, frankly. It did not live up to it's hype, but it was fine enough--and as a Toyota, I'm sure it's also going to do well by you and if you like it, that's all that matters...

    Here's another tip:

    Don't tell salespeople you need a car NOW--they love desperate and eager customers. Stick to a price somewhere between invoice and MSRP that seems fair and tell them this is what you are willing to pay. Be willing to walk out-there are many other dealers out there who will give you what you want.

    Don't forget--They are eager to move the '08's off the lot, as they need room for the next batch coming in....

    Best of luck--when in doubt, don't do it--there is no cooling off period, so if you need to sleep on it, than tell them you are tired and will come back the next day. Or maybe go for a long lunch and call some friends for advice...You are the buyer and they want your business.

    Finally, remember--there is NO PERFECT CHOICE--they all have pros and cons, and all will please and disappoint no doubt to some degree or another...

    Good luck--hopefully others will also chime in--I am no expert, but this is just from my last couple of months' experience!
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    Yes, it has a long warranty, but maybe that's cause you'll need it! (?)

    I could talk about my nine total years of Elantra ownership experience (two cars) with the most serious problem that was the fault of the car being a bad O2 sensor on my 2001 Elantra (fixed in less than an hour). But that's only one data point. Here's what CR says about the reliability of the Elantra, Fit, and 2009 Corolla:

    Elantra: Much better than average
    Fit: Much better than average
    Corolla: Too new to predict reliability
  • justloujustlou Posts: 24
    I never in my life thought I would own a Hyundai. Not to sound vain, but my last 4 new cars were Cadillacs. My sister turned me on to Hyundai when she bought a Tuscan a few years ago. Recently, my wife was due for a new car so I bought her an Elantra. She loves the thing, and even I'm impressed with it, for the price.
  • Yeah, well that's really good to hear...

    but I sense (and hear from others) the Hyundai still has a stigma to live down--CR folks live in the lab, and they like to pull out underdogs...which is good (I love CR)--but folks take a while to catch up to this sort of thing...I know a lot of people who won't touch a Korean made car (even though I think this is stigma and stereotype for the most part).

    I bet dollar for dollar, the Hondas will bring in better re-sale--especially the civic v. the elantra....Honda has been voted the Greenest company overall with all their efforts to bring on new hybrids and low emissions cars (Civic).....

    But the Corolla? No, because it's too much to begin with...and it's still the same boring look (albeit, much better safety now).
  • vad128vad128 Posts: 9
    "Can we do a roll call of who called and experiences with the corporate office?"

    I've been calling Hyundai of America periodically to get updates on the investigation and ask when Hyundai plans to respond. I get the same party line every time I call: "as of now, Hyundai has not yet received any notification from the NHTSA. It is hard to predict if and when any action will take place. Keep in mind you have a 10-year warranty, so if your car starts to have a problem, just bring it in to your dealer for service."
  • Edmunds has great information, and here's another article that may help with your decision. Best of luck with whatever you decide! :)

    http://usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/cars-trucks/rankings/Affordable-Small-Cars/-
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    I hope you are right about all those people who won't touch a Korean-made car. Because the more people who stay clear of the Elantra, the better the chance that sales won't keep soaring and prices won't keep climbing as they have been, and I'll be able to get a super deal on one if I buy one this fall. :)

    Your comment about CR liking underdogs is interesting, because for many years there were charges that CR discriminated against Korean cars in their rankings. Now that Korean cars like the Elantra are getting kudos from CR, there's talk of their pulling for underdogs. LOL. Could it be that the Elantra is simply a good car? Nah. ;)

    I expect that a Civic would command a higher price on resale than an Elantra--because the Civic costs thousands more up front than an Elantra, comparably equipped. Naturally the Elantra will sell for less used. How much less? My '04 Elantra has depreciated less than $5000 from my purchase price for a private-party sale in 4.5 years, according to Edmunds.com and KBB. That's less than $100/month depreciation. I'll take that kind of depreciation anytime. But I didn't buy my Elantra because it costs thousands less than the Civic. I bought it because I liked it better than the Civic (also the Corolla), and it offered features (hatchback, leather, traction control etc.) that at the time could not be found on ANY Civic.

    As for low emissions, the Elantra is available as a PZEV. Is the non-hybrid Civic available as a PZEV?
  • Backy,

    You sound defensive. I'm not wanting to get into an right/wrong power struggle with you.

    I should have known better to say I prefer Honda on a Hyundai forum! (Although I see you too are considering a Honda Fit as per your bio ), and you've said positive things about the civic as well (???)

    I was just trying to help the poster with what is ultimately a very private and personal decision by letting them know what I know and giving them some pointers.

    The best expert is you--the person buying the car, provided you've done some adequate research, you know what you want, you know your budget, you know what you will feel good driving for the next 3-5 years...

    Btw, by saying Consumer Reports likes to occasionally redeem themselves by bringing out underdogs does not mean that they are also not telling the truth. I never said that--that's your addition/distortion to what I said. I don't think they'd risk giving a car a high rating if it really wasn't good--that would be idiotic of them and open up huge liability. AND they do like to bring out underdogs when they find them--especially after being accused of being biased...

    Look, this decision is not about right/wrong...they're all decent enough cars-- as I said none are perfect--they all have their pros and cons. The key is to find the one that is most perfect for who you are and what your needs are right now, IMHO.

    In the final analysis, it just comes down to personal preference and gut instincts after you've done some good basic research from places like Edmunds and CR and from test driving and from reading some of these forums re: problems people are honest and humble enough to admit to after purchasing their car.

    I notice some folks have genuine regrets, and I respect these folks for speaking their truth to help future buyers--rather than feeling the need to be right about what they bought above all else.

    Best of luck to you and everyone making such an individual decision as this!
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    Defensive? No. But I think it would be more helpful to prospective buyers to talk about the merits (or demerits) of the cars themselves rather than opinions about whether lots of people would never touch a Korean car and whether CR roots for underdogs or not. Personally I don't find those kinds of comments particularly useful to someone trying to decide between different cars.

    I do happen to think the Elantra is a good choice in the small car field (especially the SE), and I have quite a bit of personal experience owning Gen 3 Elantras so I can speak to that. But since you've read my profile you know I've owned lots of cars of different brands. I don't play favorites on brands. I buy whatever best fits my needs at that time. I like the Fit too--except I really want ESC on my next car, and I don't want to spend $19k on a Fit to get that feature. And I think the Civic is a good car also, but not worth the price premium over the Elantra. Corolla? A decent car with great fuel economy and a smooth quiet ride, but again not a car that I prefer over alternatives like the Elantra.

    Please don't mistake a difference of opinion with a "power struggle." But this is a discussion forum, and I reserve the right to disagree with posts from you and others. Just as you can disagree with me. Fair enough?

    P.S. If your statement about some folks feeling the need to be right about what they bought above all else was directed at me, then you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.
  • "The sticker you are looking for is a black sticker with a bar code that is located just below the bottom hinge of the drivers side, rear door. From the top of my head, it is called FMVSS sticker which is a goverment mandated sticker. If it is not in that location, bring it back to the dealer. They are not suppose to sell you a new vehicle that is missing that sticker. Your vehicle may have been in an accident as mention by backy but somebody forgot to replace that sticker. "

    OK.....Hooorarry!!!!!!!!!!! I looked where you said and I must have been blind not to see this big black box. I was looking inside the door by the hinges. I didn't look here.

    My car has a date of Feb. 13, 2008.

    Thanks you for the more explicit details to look. Hubby is going to look at his in about an hour as he just got up and I didn't feel like going outside and getting a whiff of cigarette smoke opening his door to look. :) :) :shades:
  • Backy,

    Re:
    "But I think it would be more helpful to prospective buyers to talk about the merits (or demerits) of the cars themselves rather than opinions about whether lots of people would never touch a Korean car and whether CR roots for underdogs or not. Personally I don't find those kinds of comments particularly useful to someone trying to decide between different cars."

    Well, I respectfully disagree. We all contribute different things when such a broad question is tossed out, depending on who we are, what our style is, what we value to include in the decision making process of acquiring a new car...

    So not all responses are going to focus ONLY on concrete data--and if they did, that would be rather limiting in my view--you can go to Edmunds or CR for that--it's all there in Black and White...

    What makes responses fuller and more interesting on a forum like this IMO are personal testimonies (both positive and negative) -- as well those little tidbits of info you might not find so readily elsewhere--this only enriches the conversation, in my view.

    So I disagree with your suggestion that we should ignore something like a stigma outright (could be important info. for re-sale and maybe there is even a grain of truth to the stigma).

    And

    I don't think data such as what motivates CR (an organization which I subscribe to and love, btw) should be censored out either.

    These are relevant and very real (albeit periphery and not as central) issues, and IMO they only enrich the decision making process by providing important context.
    Why not let the buyer ultimately decide herself/himself what to toss out and what to consider?

    And BTW, If you look at all my posts re: this very big sort of question, I did include concrete pros and cons replete with referrals and suggestions re: the cars themselves-- including the new alarming fuel pump issue, which should be duly noted, IMO.

    On a personal note, I think the stigma is a sad thing, and hopefully it will slowly erode-- whether or not it is fully deserved (likely not) is an entirely different issue.

    In any case, I think it's great your personal experience with Hyundai has been so positive--the Elantra sounds like it's really served you well, and it's been a good fit for your needs-- and maybe it will be just the ticket for Clemence too! There sure are many happy Elantra owners out there, and it sounds like Clemence stumbled upon a good offer (surprising to hear at this late stage of 08 with so few SE Automatics left on the lot...)
    (Clemence--hope our responses helped in some small way and hope you let us know what you went with! :)

    I'm truly sorry for the misunderstanding, backy. Fwiw, I harbor no hard feelings...respectful disagreements and debate is very healthy--I agree with you there!
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    You misunderstood me. I did not say that opinions shouldn't be part of these discussions. I was talking about certain kinds of opinions that I don't think are very helpful in this kind of discussion. As for theories about why CR does what it does, there's an entire discussion in Town Hall for that.

    I agree that resale value is a criterion for a car buying decision and deserves discussion. But as for stigma... this is 2008, not 1988. About a million vehicles from Korean manufacturers are sold in the U.S. each year. These range from sub-$10k puddlejumpers to SUVs and luxury sedans that list for over $40k. If we are going to talk about the "stigma" of buying a Korean car, let's also talk about the stigma of buying a Japanese car. Yes, hard to believe but some folks still haven't forgotten about Pearl Harbor. Should that stigma be mentioned when someone is looking to buy a Honda, or Toyota, or other Japanese brand of car? Would that be useful information to provide? I don't think so.

    I agree, let's let the buyer ultimately decide... but let's help arm buyers with relevant facts about the cars they are considering, and with opinions based on our experiences driving and owning the cars of today, rather than prejudices based on events from long ago. In the auto industry, 20 years is a long time!
  • Okay, I'll take one more stab than I'm going to let this go because I fear we may be boring everyone else now...I haven't been very clear, I'm afraid--I'll try a bit more..

    What I was getting at re: CR is I was noting (and also wondering) how this recent glowing report changes things-- i.e, how it affects the current price (my recent quote was very inflated for example, and they said the cars were 'really hot' ever since the CR report was released, and it was observed selection for SE was severely limited as well--I was told after the CR report came out, they literally starting flying off the lot in record numbers). I would think since the report was so redeeming with such a surprise turn around that the price might go up and negotiating power might be undermined some (sure was for me).

    With regard to the stigma thing, let's be clear I'm not singling out the Koreans or Korean made cars per se--if that is what you gathered, than you too may have misunderstood me. Perhaps we should leave the words Korean and Japanese out of the conversation, and just focus on the automaker itself so as not to confuse the issue. I probably shouldn't have framed it that way initially without qualifying what I was referring to.

    My intention was to emphasize re-sale values, and this remains highest with the Toyotas and the Hondas over the Hyundai. That's just what's so, whether you or I like it or not--and so I just think this fact needs to be noted.

    The reality is cars that have previously carried poor reputations take time to get re-cover from this--and the onus is not only on us as consumers to be forgiving, but to keep a careful eye on the automaker to ensure they are consistently turning out much better cars. It's up to them as much as us to turn a bad reputation into a good one that sticks. And until and unless that happens, (and yes, it does seem to take a while longer than maybe it should), re-sale value will likely continue to be undermined.

    With regard to your other comment about Pearl Harbor and folks who continue to carry grudges--I agree. There will always be stubborn folks who will Never buy certain makes because of past hurts (and that's their perogative naturally, although I think they are really short changing themselves in choosing to exclude some darn good proven makers). Goodness, for that matter-- we even still see folks who refuse to buy ANY foreign made car whatsoever!

    But this level of obstinance is IMO a different matter--it's closer to pure stubborness (maybe even bigotry?) . It's more than just responding to a temporary stigma or bad reputation that lingers for a couple of years due to legitimate concerns re: recent bad or lack luster products from just a couple of years ago. It's different simply because the facts are simply so solid and have been out so long-- Toyota and Honda in particular have taken every length to prove itself again and again by putting out phenomenal vehicles for twenty some years now...

    BTW, I'll bet there are certainly fewer of these stubborn folks around than there were ten years ago. Even stubborn 'ol cranks cave in when they need a good fuel economy car that is reliable and safe.

    Hyundai-- in contrast to Toyota and Honda-- is still freshly just proving themselves, so the stigma is fresher and that's why the re-sale value is not as high yet. It's my understanding Hyundai came out with some real poor cars, did they not? Isn't it only very recently that CR and others have begun to take this auto-maker seriously and even more recent that a couple of models (ie, Elantra SE) are now seen as as top contenders to some Japanese cars? Isn't it only recently Hyundai itself has made efforts to improve their cars? When this happens, over time, the bad reputation does dissipate. Again--it's not just our perceptions--some of it is based in fact from some poor products that emerged in the past: As such, the onus is on the automaker to prove itself and win us over with a high quality product over time with a product we can consistently rely upon as we make these huge decisions.

    It's the quality of the auto and the demonstrated commitment of the automaker itself over time that speaks volumes and contributes to lasting consumer confidence.

    It looks like the Elantra SE may be well on it's way to doing this (and I'm starting to read and hear some good things about the Sonata and other Hyundai models too!).

    I certainly hope (fingers crossed) Hyundai continues putting out good cars as this means more choices and more competition-- and so we all win!

    I hope that's clearer. Thanks for the interesting discourse!

    Regards,
    Skeptical
  • vad128vad128 Posts: 9
    Here is an excerpt from an article which appeared in the Money Section of MSN.com a few weeks ago:

    "The appeal of fuel efficiency is moving beyond the new-car market and creating a run on small used cars. Used economy cars that once could be difficult for dealers to move -- the Ford Focus and Chevrolet Aveo, for instance -- are now flying off lots, and prices are rising. In May and June, the 10 used cars with the fastest-rising prices, according to J.D. Power & Associates, included the Hyundai Elantra, up almost 9% from the year-earlier period, and the Kia Spectra, up nearly 8%. A few years ago, the list was dominated by larger, more luxurious cars like the Lexus LS Series."

    Given the current discussion, I thought many would find this interesting. If you want to read the full article, click on the following link:

    http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SavingandDebt/SaveonaCar/WhyA3YearOldCivicC- osts16118Dollars.aspx?GT1=33009

    While Hondas and Toyotas still have excellent re-sale value, Hyundais and Kias are gaining momentum.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    Thanks for the clarifications and re-statements. You are right, I did not understand where you were coming from based on your earlier posts.

    However, I think you have outdated information regarding where Hyundai is relative to competitors, and specifically (for this discussion) wrt the Elantra. Just so I am sure I understood you, here is what you said:

    Isn't it only very recently that CR and others have begun to take this auto-maker seriously and even more recent that a couple of models (ie, Elantra SE) are now seen as as top contenders to some Japanese cars? Isn't it only recently Hyundai itself has made efforts to improve their cars?

    Actually, Hyundai's big improvements in quality started ten years ago, when the company's president redirected the company to quality vs. just making low priced cars. That was also the genesis of the 10-year warranty, to help demonstrate the company's commitment to quality and reliability. The first designs that rolled out after this re-direction, in 2000, were the 2001 Elantra and Santa Fe. Both were well received by the automotive press. I'll focus on the Elantra here since that is the topic of this discussion. That generation of Elantra, designed over 10 years ago, was an Edmunds.com Most Wanted car for at least two years and is now their "best bet" for small used cars. The Elantra also took second, by 1/2 a point, in a small car comparo that C/D did in 2002; it was just edged out by the Protege (because of that car's sharper handling, a C/D preference) but beat cars like the then-new Corolla and the Civic. So do you see that Hyundais, particulary the Elantra, have been competitive with Japanese cars for some time--nearly ten years at least? And the latest Elantra continues that trend by getting high marks from CR, and is in fact their top choice (in SE trim) for small cars right now. (And the Santa Fe is also CR's top choice in its class, so it's not just the Elantra.)

    I note all this because I get the feeling that your information about Hyundai and the Elantra in particular is somewhat outdated. I hope this is useful to you, and others, trying to decide if the Elantra is a good choice.
  • gomst1.....thanks for the info. Because of what you stated I was able to find the manufacturer dates.

    Hubby's car (which the fuel pump went bad) is manufactured on March 9, 2008. Almost 3 weeks after the date of mine which was Feb 13, 2008.

    As for all the talk about Elantras this and Elantras that, can't we do a manufacturer date of everyones car that the fuel pump went bad in? This would give us an idea of whether or not there is a possiblity ours might go maybe.

    IMO.... there is a lot of negativity here over the fuel pumps and a lot of negativity over if the Elantra is even a good car.

    I say .... if it goes (fuel pump) it goes and you get it fixed. IMO I think personally knowing my fuel pump still might go that if I knew now what I know now, I would still buy the Elantra.

    Its a good car. And there's no getting around that. Bad fuel pump and all. :shades:
  • Well, sure-- if it goes, it goes and you will be forced to tow it in and get it fixed--and hopefully that won't happen in the middle of busy traffic where you or others will be harmed. Since you own the car, you pretty much don't have a choice but to have that attitude.

    But then to go on and say it's 'negative' to highlight this to prospective buyers? Uh, no--I don't call that being negative--I call that being realistic and honest about a potentially dangerous problem that should be taken seriously.

    IMO, It would be negligent to not duly note this to a prospective buyer.

    I certainly would not buy an 'O8 SE Elantra after reading the number of fuel pump problems now emerging until I knew said problem was resolved. That's just too huge of an issue for me to gamble on.
  • dovid2dovid2 Posts: 90
    Hi, backy, glad to see you're still active here.

    Actually, I always heard the quality began to improve in 2000; ours had 80,000 miles on it with no major repairs when we gave it to my stepdaughter, who still drives it.

    "The Elantra also took second, by 1/2 a point, in a small car comparo that C/D did in 2002; it was just edged out by the Protege (because of that car's sharper handling, a C/D preference) but beat cars like the then-new Corolla and the Civic."

    Oddly enough, I was thinking of that article just recently, and still regretting that they didn't test the GT, which, with its superior handling and much higher content, would have blown the Protege away.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,784
    Yes, the Gen 2 Elantra was a pretty good car also (I almost bought one in 1997!). It had the first-generation Beta engine. But it was designed in the mid-'90s, when Hyundai's focus was still on being the low cost carmaker, vs. value/quality. But the 1996-2000 Elantras were still pretty good for their time. I recall that in another comparo (C/D or MT, can't remember which) that car did quite well, although not 2nd.
  • "IMO, It would be negligent to not duly note this to a prospective buyer.

    I certainly would not buy an 'O8 SE Elantra after reading the number of fuel pump problems now emerging until I knew said problem was resolved. That's just too huge of an issue for me to gamble on."

    Interesting point. Would you agree that Hyundai is being negligent by not requiring full disclosure to prospective buyers that a safety investigation is pending?
  • Re: "Interesting point. Would you agree that Hyundai is being negligent by not requiring full disclosure to prospective buyers that a safety investigation is pending?"

    Yes, I would personally-- but I'm sure they wouldn't see it that way. And I'm sure legally (technically) they're covered up to a certain point. There is no way a company is going to disclose such a thing to prospective buyers unless they are forced to!

    I'm talking ethics, though. And that's why forums like this one are so helpful, IMHO-- to fill in the gaps. :)
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