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2007 Buick LaCrosse ABS system

carl33carl33 Posts: 1
edited September 12 in Buick
I have a 2007 Buick LaCrosse.
The other night my wife was driving home when a deer ran out in front of the car.
She locked up the brakes and the car actually skidded sideways.
I thought the ABS system was supposed to kick in and prevent the locking up of the brakes.

I was told by my mechanic that the new ABS system only works if you pump the breaks.
This doesn't sound right to me. Would anyone be able to advise if there is a problem with my ABS system. I suspect I do.

Thanks

Comments

  • mrrogersmrrogers Posts: 391
    I suspect that you do have a problem. I would file a report with the National Highway Transportation Safety Board, and then notify your Buick Service Manager that you have done so. Please document each of your visits to the dealer just in case you need to file a lemon law case to get the car replaced. You are correct that you should not pump the brakes on an ABS equipped car. You may need to find another dealer. Good luck!
  • e_net_ridere_net_rider Posts: 1,380
    I'll also second that opinion that something is wrong.
    What type of surface and road conditions existed?
    I'm unfamiliar as to what systems yours employs. ABS, traction control, electronic stability?
    These systems work together if you have two or three. And can vary by vehicle a bit in exact action. An 09 Malibu I had, it had all three and according to manual if a wheel lost traction it would automatically apply braking to correct direction of travel according to steering wheel position.
    It did not work as stated for me when needed on one occasion. I had swung wide on damp surface and the rear lost traction and started coming around. Having had lots of snow and ice experience, I immediately dropped acceleration which it was supposed to do, and countersteered to regain traction.
    I may have gotten the traction light but my actions were either faster than the computer or the system failed to operate as advertised. It was I, not the system, that saved the vehicle from sliding sideways into the curb.
    Your description sounds like to much braking power was applied to rear brakes. I had such a vehicle that the factory left a tool on the diverter/proportioning valve and any panic stop would throw it sideways. I think all that special balancing is now done in the single hydraulic unit controlling the above mentioned systems.

    It might be wise to find a wide open parking lot where you can test it under varying conditions such as wet or icey slippery. Read manual, understand what systems you have and how they are supposed to work. Try to test each portion of it.
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