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Subaru Legacy: Typical high-mileage repairs?

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  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,576
    Yeah, I could buy that argument if one could verify these "highway" miles and if one could aslo verify that the car was maintained. I don't think that "highway miles" per se would make me jump at a high mileage car is what I'm saying. A big fat maintenance record would be more persuasive to me that the type of road the car ran on.

    MODERATOR

  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I tend to prefer the opposite. An older car, perhaps a few extra years, with less mileage. That's where you find the well preserved gems, IMO. My 1993 Miata had just 27k miles when I bought it last year, for about 1/3 the cost when new.

    -juice
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    My XT6 was like 11 years old with 52K miles. And I got it for $1K

    It runs like a top, juice even drove it once (and that was before I tuned it up)

    -mike
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,576
    I didn't mean I preferred high mileage cars over low mileage ones ...lol! Hardly.......

    Of course, really really low miles on a ten year old car can be a problem too, but that's really another topic.

    MODERATOR

  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,924
    Obviously the less miles the better I am not a fan of high milage cars and I agree I would also like to see a maintenance record.
    But some Folks are buying cars with a lot of miles and the best advice is still have any!!! prospective used purchase checked by a professional that you trust.

    This would not apply in the case where not a lot of money is involved.

    Juice I agree a deal like you got is the way to go little roadsters like the Miata are usually a summer toy and do not as a rule rack up a lot of miles, but methinks there are more rocks than gems out there concerning older cars and low miles.

    The xt6 that you found Mike is the exception rather than the rule.

    Cheers Pat.
  • nygregnygreg Posts: 1,936
    be an indicator? It's difficult to put 30K miles/year driving in the city. Just a thought.

    Greg
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I dunno I put on a lot of city and hard miles on my Rodeo. 2.5years 120K miles. It still looked like new when I traded it in. Dealer couldn't believe it had 120K on the clock. So milage may be a good indicator, but not absolute.

    -mike
  • Do these normally have to be replaced often?
  • cptpltcptplt Posts: 1,075
    not sure what the ? is, if you have it and don't replace it, you may end up one day replacing the whole engine.
    never heard of a Sube needing one but have had bad experiences with Acuras and Hondas and Fords needing them at "low" mileages - 50-70K!
  • lark6lark6 Posts: 2,565
    Wander over to Maintenance/Repair and Meet the Members. I had to have a leaky head gasket (water pump gasket, too) replaced this past week on a '00 Forester with 31,700 miles - much lower mileage than the cars you describe. My confidence in Subaru is shaken but the level of attention paid by the dealer and SoA have me hoping that the fix will hold for the duration of my ownership experience. I don't want to even try to pinpoint the root cause of the gasket failure. It didn't happen until about 4 weeks after my 30K maintenance and after I had driven from eastern PA to the NC mountains and back on vacation. I'll leave it at that.

    Ed
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    On older subies, if you overheated the engine there was a 50-50 chance you'd soon need a head gasket. They've gotten better. My dad had several put on his Reliant Ks in under 70K miles.

    -mike
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,576
    Yep, and old Subarus like to drop valves, too, and the oil pumps wear out--many people keep driving though, since the worn pumps only make for a clattery engine, which the old Subarus had anyway, so most folks hardly noticed the increase in noise level.

    30K for a head gasket failure is pretty premature, that's true. Maybe the engine overheated without you noticing it. That will warp a head quickly enough on a modern car. But sometimes it's just assembly problems. Statistically, all new cars will have a certain number of defects.

    MODERATOR

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    It wasn't the oil pumps that went bad. It was the oil seal gasket. This allowed air to mix with the oil and manifest itself in the lifters. I have this problem currently on my XT6, although it goes away after 10-15 min of driving.

    -mike
  • lark6lark6 Posts: 2,565
    Mr. Shiftright (any relation to Nigel?): I never had any indication of overheating. The dealer service department did not report a warped head; then again, they may not have checked for it. Had the head become warped, I'd expect the leaking to begin again very soon, which it hasn't yet, knock wood. This would lead me to believe your latter analysis.

    Ed
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,576
    oil pumps---you mean a seal in the oil pump itself? Well, same-o/same-o, you have to take the pump out and fix it, so "oil pump failure". This happened in an XT I was driving for a short time. Maybe just swapping out the pump is the safest way to go. It wasn't all that expensive as I recall and it did the trick.

    I don't know why running the engine for a while would fix a seal, was my point, but your explanation is certainly plausible as one cause of clattery lifters. Audis have a similar issue (the V-6 engines) but this is a pressure valve problem.

    MODERATOR

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Will cause the oil to become thinner and/or pump up the lifters with oil pushing out the air bubbles that were sucked in by the oil pump. Thicker oil can help eliviate at least temporarily this issue. XTs are cool, although even with the TC it's slow.

    -mike
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,576
    Well, I don't buy that on first reading but thank you for the argument. If the pump is sucking air it will just continue to do so, seems to me.....but maybe there's some self-bleeding thing going on that I just can't fathom at the moment. I'll keep tapping my teeth with my fingers on that one.

    Yeah, XTs are an acquired taste. I like the new Subarus a lot better than any of the older ones.

    MODERATOR

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    It's pretty much been researched by at least 20+ people I know who specialize in old subies. Very common problem. The air-temp/humidity can cause the seal to expand or contract, thus allowing air to be sucked in sometimes and not at others. Also thicker oil will be less likely to allow air seepage.

    I like my XT6 better than some of the new ones. It has more low-end torque than the WRX :)

    -mike
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,924
    You need to take a deep breath and relax, you can be very sure that they did check for warped heads and engine block as well.

    This is standard practice in an engine rebuild, SOA.are paying for this repair and you can be sure it will be done properly first time around, they are not going to the trouble of rebuilding an engine to have it blow up in a short time again.

    If there is the least suspicion that the heads are warped, they will either be resurfaced or replaced, the usual course is to replace the heads as resurfacing can alter the compression ratio,

    Cheers Pat.
  • lark6lark6 Posts: 2,565
    I suspect that they did, just didn't see it on the invoice.

    I have often wanted to get the head (and the spare head) on the old OHV 6 Stude resurfaced and magnafluxed, but haven't had the inclination, much less the desire to heave that old cast iron lunker into the back of the Forester.

    I think I'm just gonna take some time over the holiday to fling the Subie around some PA country backroads to get that old feeling back again - it'll be good for the car and my peace of mind.

    Ed
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,576
    I still don't see what air temperature and humidity have to do with an oil pump submerged in hot oil. Seals are either good or they aren't. Well, I don't have 20 specialists (are there 20 people in the world who work only on Subarus?), but I will consult my one expert (His name is Jim Askim but we call him Saint James, for the miracles he performs) and see what other comments he might have on this clattery valve phenomenon, okay?

    MODERATOR

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    no problem. My valve tap comes and goes on my XT6, no rhyme or reason so the air-sucking problem is viable IMHO. Cause if the pump was bad, my engine would have blown about 30K miles ago (and those are very hard 30K miles, 20-30 auto-xs etc) Thicker oil helps also to eliviate the problem, which makes sense cause air-bubbles will less likely form in a thicker oil than a thin one.

    -mike
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,576
    Yes, but thicker oil will allow the oil pump to pump more oil up there. The problem, as I see it, is internal wear in the pump...the clearances are too large and thicker oil helps fill that up somewhat. What I'm curious about is whether the clatter is caused by an actual drop in oil pressure or by cavitation of the oil (foaming) from the large clearances.

    Well, it's interesting to speculate. If you ever do take the pump out, it would be good to measure the clearances and see if they are out of factory spec. Whether by wear or by bad seal, replacing your pump will cure the problem.

    MODERATOR

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Oil Pressure never drops, so that isn't the issue. Luckily the XT6 has a real pressure guage which is nice.

    -mike
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,924
    Go for it, you need to reinforce the satisfaction thar you had with the forester before the problem crept up, and I don,t know of any better way than to just get in and go for a good satisfying drive.

    I know how you feel about throwing a big old junky cylinder head into your nice car, I feel the same way about mine.

    Cheers Pat.
  • My 90 Legacy would start up fine. However, when the engine is at idle speed, it would run really rough and stall. If you give it gas and keep the engine reving above 1000RPM, it seem to run fine.

    So far, the car got new air filter, fuel filter, pvc valve, spark plugs and wires. All these didn't seem to help.

    Anyone have this problem before?

    I manage to find the green service connectors under the dash. After plugin them together, the "Check engine light" give the 3 flash when the car is running. I got no idea how to decode this. Any help is appreciated.

    Thanks
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    You're doing the right things. I'd get a professional throttle body service. It solved the hesitation on our 626.

    -juice
  • otoluvaotoluva Posts: 138
    I own a 93 legacy sedan that I bought new and has 114000 miles on it,it still runs great,I have always changed oil on time and tuned it up regularly,I did have several times in the past oil leaks in different spots and that's about the worse that ever happened,the car still has its original muffler!the engine is good except that its a bit noisy and sounds whimpy(washer machine like-it always did )but what I like best about this car is the climate control which I think is the best I have ever seen on a car(has not been serviced yet)my question is what should I expect in the future as far as repairs and stuff and is it worth keeping and maintaining or it is time to replace it before major things start to deteriorate?
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    It should be good for 200K miles. I just bought a '91 XT6 with 125K miles cause I know they'll last well.

    -mike
This discussion has been closed.