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2009 BMW 3-Series

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Comments

  • carnaughtcarnaught Posts: 1,569
    I'll be happy to discuss the 2009 3 Series when you decide to do so. ;)
  • fedlawmanfedlawman Posts: 3,118
    The video linked above features a nice 3-series with factory performance parts installed.

    Here's a topic - the pros and cons of factory performance parts vs. Dinan. Discuss. :blush:
  • carnaughtcarnaught Posts: 1,569
    Being a carlover but not a gearhead, I confess that I am personally ignorant about and have never experienced any Dinan modifications. Please feel free to open discussion and educate me (us) on them as they relate to the '09 3 series.
  • jmarounjmaroun Posts: 139
    I'd be very careful to mod a car that's still under warrentee. Especially a BMW.
    I was considering removing/modifying the CDV valve for example..but
    have decided against it. First to second gear engagement was less
    seemless before they changed the fuel pump. I thought it was the CDV but after BMW changed the faulty fuel pump.. now, first gear gives
    far more roll for relaxed (under 3.5krpm) shifts. The result is a smoother
    shift from 1st to 2nd. I'm soooo glad they replaced that faulty fuel pump under warrentee!! I wonder if they would have had I modified the CDV.

    Joseph
    San Diego
  • carnaughtcarnaught Posts: 1,569
    Joseph, good point. I would hate to void a warranty. I'd be hesitant to have any German car not in warranty.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,024
    I'd be hesitant to have any German car not in warranty.

    Not me; here's a summary of the service/repair experiences of my 1995 3 Series and my wife's 2004 X3 2.5:
    The 3er sees my independent shop for the Inspection II(30K) service. I perform the Oil Services and Inspection I services myself. The coolant changes and the brake fluid flushes are done at either the dealer or the independent shop. As for repairs? Not many. I've replaced a couple of serpentine belt idler pullies and a brake light switch. I also spent 15 minutes and $44 replacing the timing chain tensioner as a precaution. It got a full set of pads and rotors at 103K, and a new thermostat at 104K. My average monthly expense? $50. I should also mention that the above maintenance figure includes 3 sets of Z rated rubber, as the car also serves as one of my track rats.

    The X3 has been serviced exclusively at the dealer(aside from my DIY oil changes). The monthly costs are higher($65/month) because of several services that were required during the past 18 months. I fitted four new P Zero Nero all season tires, changed the ATF and transfer case fluid(not required but vital for long term reliability), fitted new pads and rotors all around, and had the Inspection II and brake fluid flush performed. I also spent $55 to repair a wheel that my wife had gently curbed. Based on our annual mileage, the truck won't need any of those items again(save the brake flush and tires) for at least another 5 years. I do change the oil at 7.5K myself using an OEM filter and Mobil 1 0W-40; the 15K factory interval is a bit too long in my experience.
    Oh yeah, I also run a 1975 2002A...

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • fedlawmanfedlawman Posts: 3,118
    "I'd be hesitant to have any German car not in warranty."

    I would personally say that I'd hesitate to own a modern German car not in warranty. As to the question of modding, it depends on the mod.

    Brake pads, tires, wheels, and carbon fiber dashboard trim won't void any warranty. As for the clutch delay valve, I think that's safe too - how would anyone know it's been removed? And even if they did, they would have to show its removal directly caused a component to fail. How could anyone do that?
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,024
    As for the clutch delay valve, I think that's safe too - how would anyone know it's been removed?

    You can even buy a gutted CDV so that the car would pass a thorough visual inspection. My dealer is pretty good about reasonable mods; my service advisor tracks his E36 M3(he also rides a Triumph Bonneville- good man!) while several of the salespeople also run their cars at track events. It's nice to have actual enthusiasts in charge who cater to enthusiasts- it's so unlike many dealers and owners who lose their bladder control if "BMW and "track" are used in the same sentence...

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,024

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • Probably a good idea. It will increase engine longevity in M cars I suspect.
  • fedlawmanfedlawman Posts: 3,118
    I don't know what's worse, the demise of the 8500 RPM Inline-6, or an SUV with an M badge.

    Both are reasons why I'll probably never own a BMW built in the 21st century.
  • jmarounjmaroun Posts: 139
    A necessary move in the right direction of progress. There's nothing to fear since fuel efficiency says nothing about power/lb ratio. I expect this ratio to steadilly increase along with efficiency. Hopefully much more effort will be placed on reducing the denominator of that ratio. My turbo'd 335i is just as high reving as my ni 330i and I hope that aspect doesn't change.

    This news isn't surprising at all. I expect a new M3 in less than 3 years time.
    Can't wait!!

    Joseph
    San Diego
  • As long as it's an inline 6, I'm happy. If I ever see a V-6 in a BMW I'm going to throw up. :cry: It took me years to accept a V-8, but I caved in when I remembered BMW's history had precedents. V12s don't seem relevant to 3 series cars.
  • fedlawmanfedlawman Posts: 3,118
    "My turbo'd 335i is just as high reving as my ni 330i and I hope that aspect doesn't change."

    Yes, but neither of those is an M car. I don't care if BMW puts a turbo V-6 in every grocery getter they sell (I'm not buying one anyways) - as long as they leave the M's alone. M cars are supposed to be special, focused, and uncompromised.

    What they're doing with the M cars tarnishes the whole brand. It's like hearing a punk rock song from your favorite independent band in a TV commercial for maxi pads. It's a sell out, nothing more.
  • carnaughtcarnaught Posts: 1,569
    Anyone else experience the newer generation iDrive that's found on the 2009's?

    Among other things, the graphics are much better. You now have the ability to go back to the previous screen and the surrounding buttons that go directly to a given function such as "Audio" make using it quicker and easier. Redundant controls for the radio with six preset function buttons are available as are climate control functions so you can totally bypass the iDrive for routine use.

    I think IDrive for all its bad press is really easy to use and is much more intuitive. It greatly trumps the Command Center controls of the Mercedes while still overall falling short of those found in Japanese marques. The single control of the round dial on the console has been trend setting and iDrive, I believe, will continue to improve.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,024
    What they're doing with the M cars tarnishes the whole brand. It's like hearing a punk rock song from your favorite independent band in a TV commercial for maxi pads. It's a sell out, nothing more.

    At the 2001 X5 4.6is press intro BMW NA's Martin Birkman told me why the hot X didn't wear an M badge:
    "An M car typically has a manual transmission, rear wheel drive, and a high- revving engine."
    So much for that... :mad:
    On the other hand, I'm sure BMW realizes that the softer, low-revving M cars will attract more BMW wearers and poseurs. And it appears that the strategy is already bearing fruit... :P

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • cdnpinheadcdnpinhead Forest Lakes, AZPosts: 3,210
    ". . .it appears that the strategy is already bearing fruit..."

    Already?

    Hasn't this strategy been in play since the '80's, when the "driver's car" became the must-have accessory of the upwardly-mobile?

    It appears to have worked every time it's been tried, for going-on 25 years.

    The fact that actual car guys have shunned the brand in recent years, for a variety of reasons, is beyond irrelevant in the land of the BMW marketing "team."

    There's more at the door.

    Oh boy.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,024
    Hasn't this strategy been in play since the '80's, when the "driver's car" became the must-have accessory of the upwardly-mobile?

    Yes, but the M cars were the last refuge of the real enthusiasts. Now even more M driver seats will be filled by imbeciles who think that trailing throttle oversteer is a band that used to open for Kansas.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • fedlawmanfedlawman Posts: 3,118
    Here's what put the 3-series on the map...

    image

    Andrew McCarthy, Molly Ringwald, and a 325.
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,261
    The engine change aside, shorter term concerns exist.

    They might need to do another movie quick...

    CEO says BMW in “biggest crisis in its history;” rivals have similar concerns

    BMW, which has seen it sales double since 1999, is now in the “biggest crisis in its history,” CEO Norbert Reithofer told Germany’s Spiegel. Like all automakers, BMW’s sales have been hit hard by the financial crisis, but the company’s reliance on leasing for a large percentage puts it in an even more vulnerable position.

    Reithofer isn’t alone in his sentiment. Daimler boss Dieter Zetsche admitted the situation could easily be the “worst crisis since World War II.” If that’s the case, expect more job cuts and production slowdowns at Mercedes and BMW.

    Even Volkswagen, which has a much broader brand and model mix, is concerned about its future. “We have never before seen this kind of a crisis,” chairman Martin Winterkorn said. He said it would be impossible for his company to avoid “difficult cuts” and “painful” measures.

    According to the New York Times, luxury cars from BMW and Mercedes are beginning to pile up at U.S. ports. But they aren’t the only ones. Literally thousands of Toyota and Nissan models have filled acres of land at the port in Long Beach, California. In fact, Mercedes, Toyota and Nissan have requested to lease additional space at a 160-acre lot to park their slow-selling cars.

    Recently, Toyota Executive Vice President Mitsuo Kinoshita characterized the current situation as “an emergency, of a magnitude we have never seen before.”

    So is any automaker immune to the economic collapse in America, Europe, and Asia? Simply put: no. After all, Mercedes, BMW, VW, and Toyota are usually thought of as the most stable automakers in the world. Their survival will depend entirely on their ability to quickly adapt to slowing sales. Without the same rigid union and legacy costs of the Detroit Three, we’re hopeful they’ll all pull through.


    Regards,
    OW
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