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Subaru Crew - Modifications II

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Comments

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Like the plague! I just spent $500 on parts to convert my XT6 to non-air suspension... Not a fun prospect.

    -mike
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    Check here:


    http://www.impreza-rs.com/cgi-bin/ubb/forumdisplay.cgi?action=topics&forum=Legacy+Forum&number=6&DaysPrune=1&LastLogin=


    Folks on this site will have some answers, as a few of them have exactly the car you are considering.

  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Justin Coleman, a local i Clubber, has the SAFC and showed it to me up close. He ran through all the functions and they looked pretty cool.

    He also showed me dyno charts, and they looked impressive. He's up 40hp at the wheels with all his upgrades, and he doesn't even have headers or cams!

    The catch is you have to program it, and the best way to do that is on the dyno. So that's what costs you.

    The good news is that it has good fuel programming control, and actually calculates the mileage for you. Overall it was actually running 2% leaner than before, which could save gas.

    If you like gizmos, it's one heck of a gizmo. You can display all kinds of charts with lights that move up and down. Not my cup of tea, but...

    -juice
  • ramonramon Posts: 825
    just want to add somemore oomph to the car.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    He did say it gave him more power, but I think specifically it provides better control of the fuel/air mix and such.

    Its cost plus the dyno time may not make it the most cost-effective mod.

    Just my 2 cents' worth.

    -juice
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    juice,

    Speaking of mods, any more developments in Project Forester 2.5RS?

    Ken
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I've been thinking...

    What else can I do that'll keep it civil for the baby?

    I've read a bunch more about K&Ns, and definitely decided against those. Foam filters are much less talked about, though.

    I still have to buy that intake hose and try to silence the hum.

    Then what? Maybe swap the tranny fluid to synthetic, as well as the rear differential fluid.

    As for non-peformance mods, I'm working on an in-car DVD player. Got the notebook PC from work, managed to get DVD software for it, then a car-charger for it, so now it's ready to go, I just have to try it.

    Funny thing is only the baby sits in the back seat, so it'll probably be showing Sesame Street videos.

    Come to think of it - that is a performance mod. I'll drive faster to get it over with! ;-)

    -juice
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    juice,

    Seasame Street as a performance mod -- that cracked me up! Hey, who knows, the sound of a turbocharger spooling up just might be soothing to a baby!

    I think we've hit all the low-hanging fruit in terms of mods. Anything else before we go to Phase II? Sesame Street in dts surround sound?

    Ken
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Hmm, good point. Now to sell that turbo concept to the wife...

    I may follow the i Clubs instructions to paint the logo the same color as my Forester (Acadia Green Metallic). I wonder if the touch-up paint will be enough to do that big of an area.

    Or I could do it in yellow and get an extra 5 horsepower!

    Then I have to try to suction out that small indentation in the rear passenger side door. It's very minor, but I notice it.

    Spring cleaning, maybe? I may clean the brakes a bit. During the recall of the master cylinder they bleed them, so no need.

    No mods on the horizon for now, though I did help Hutch put his 18mm rear sway bar on this past weekend. :-)

    -juice
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    Brakes, droog. Metalmaster Powerstop pads for the front from Primitive (www.get-primitive.com), and Motul 600 synth fluid, maybe SS lines, although that isn't as important, IMHO. Got my Powerstops Friday, along with a pint of fluid. Waiting for better weather, as I don't have a garage.

    What have you read about K&N? I've been told they really don't filter very well after a while. Someone from i-Club GAVE me one at the 1st MASC meeting, but there ain't no diff on the butt dyno. I think the paper one is going back in.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Let me know when you do that. I may even be able to help.

    Do you have instructions for bleeding them?

    Are those semi-metallic pads? I've heard they grab better but are also more likely to squeek.

    I think if I did the brakes, I'd change the rear drums to discs (from a junkyard S) first. That would be a heck of a project.

    -juice
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    yea, they're semi-metallic all right. I don't know how to bleed the fluid. Do you have a garage? Maybe I could zip over there and we could do the pads.....
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Everyone I know who's automotively in the know, say the K&N filters are the best you can get for a drop in. The key is to clean and re-oil them at regular intervals. I noticed a slight increase in the Butt Dyno on the Trooper during 4000+rpm acceleration, and 1mpg increase in fuel milage.

    I like em cause they are re-usable.

    Brakes to me are the 2nd most important thing you can do on your car, after tires. I may go for some cross drilled rotors on the Trooper when the time comes and some Semi-metalic or metalic pads.

    -mike
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    Guess I'm not in the know!

    I prefer AMSOil foam filters for cars... Dirtbikes come standard with foam filters and the guys that use a cotton gauze filter on their dirtbikes apparently can afford rebuilds more often than I.

    -Colin
  • kenskens Posts: 5,869
    Same here. I chose Amsoil over K&N because I've read here and there that they do a better job in filtering dirt. I was willing to sacrifice some airflow (still better than paper, though) for getting the job done.

    Perhaps in practice, the difference is minor.

    Ken
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I was asking basically K&N v. Stock Paper...

    Amsoil may very well be better than the K&N, just passing on what I heard/asked about.

    -mike
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I have a car port, but it's open, so it would get cold. I have good basic tools, but not brake-specific tools (don't we need a C clamp of some sort?). E-mail me.

    The K&N debate gets interesting. They dominate the aftermarket, so I'm sure a lot of folks are out to get them. In their advertising they say F1 folks use their filters.

    Then again, those engines typically last about 2-3 hours.

    -juice
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,927
    Hi Juice and lucien while synthetic fluid is highly desirable because it does not absorb moisture it is very difficult to bleed air from the system.

    I know this from experience because this is what I have in my 89 accord,having said that it is worth the grief to persevere because this is the last time you are going to be replacing brake fluid.

    If you are changing fluid I would suggest you spring for a set of braided stainless steel flex hoses they really firm up the pedal and improve braking by a good thirty percent the before and after has to be experienced to be believed.

    There is no big mystery about changing pads you need a large c clamp to compress the pistons back in the bores as for bleeding you keep at it until all the air bubbles are gone, you should be able to pick up a book at your public library on the procedure otherwise get a hold of a workshop manual, I live too far from guys as I would love to get involved in giving you a hand good luck.

    Cheers Pat. PS> I know it as silicon fluid.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I have a pair of c-clamps that I use for wood, about 4" opening. Will that do?

    Loosh - are their instructions with the brake pads? Miata.net has printed instructions but they are so-so and it's a different vehicle.

    I have a Haynes for the Miata, too.

    -juice
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,927
    Juice 6 inch or bigger is desirable 4 inch would be pushing it, if you can change pads in one vehicle you can do them all.
    My suggestion do one side at a time that way you always have one fully assembled brake set up to refer to.
    Cheers Pat.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I was actually guessing. I'll check my clamps tonight, measure them. Heck, what am I saying? I'll get digital photos.

    -juice
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,927
    Okay Juice keep me posted.
    Cheers pat.
  • Heh. It used to be that if you pushed the pistons back on a Subie, you'd break them! On the early 80's models the handbrake worked on the front pads and there was a threaded mechanism attached to the piston. Pushing them back (as one did on every other car on the planet) would break the mechanism. You had to rotate them until they were fully retracted.

    FWIW I use a set of very large channel-lock pliers (over a foot long). This tool, and a substantial hammer, are a mechanic's best allies ;-) Seriously, the pliers are great for removing oil filters and a bunch of other stuff too. I don't know where the name comes from but I've long called them "chicken pliers".

    Cheers,
    -wdb
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    To take the cap of the brake resivoir off when you compress the piston.

    -mike
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,927
    Juice, I just had a thought most cars on the road use a single piston sliding caliper design while the sube uses two piston design you have to clamp one piston before trying to compress the other piston into the bore otherwise hydraulic pressure can cause the unclamped piston to be forced right out of the bore.

    Franchophile, the screw type you describe is still used for the handbrake on most rear disc designs, it is subject to seizing particularly in situations where large amounts of road salt is used,Subaru use a drum in rotor design on their rear disc setup which is more superior
  • hondafriekhondafriek Ottawa CanadaPosts: 2,927
    Good point Mike, better still take a turkey baster looks like a large syringe and remove some brake fluid.
    Cheers Pat.
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    wdb, "Channel-Lock" is a brand name. I believe they developed that type of slip-adjustable jaw pliers. Pliers, channel-locks, dikes... we know what you're talking about.

    btw, using them on oil filters? yeah, that's like 30 seconds before you really thrash the stuck filter and look around for a screwdriver or punch to put through it, and 5 minutes before you cut away the filter with tin snips and work at the threaded boss directly. been there, done that...

    -Colin
  • Those are wire cutters, a.k.a. diagonal cutting pliers, a.k.a. dikes.

    Never had an oil filter quite *that* siezed. I'm impressed by your perseverance though :-) Reminds me of some of frozen kingpins I've removed, like the one where we had to take the entire axle out (of a semi-tractor) and haul it to the location of a 60-ton press. When that thing finally popped loose, BANG! What a noise.

    Ah, youth. The work I do these days is measured in megabits.

    Cheers,
    -wdb
  • Juice,
    I browse thru yr site and found that modification very cool. Just wonder if it fits to 2001 model. I just got my S+ 3 days ago and I am really happy with that car!
  • locke2clocke2c Posts: 5,038
    wdb, unfortunately I have removed oil filters like that at least twice. Strangely, both times I was certain that the stuck filters were installed only hand-tight and the gaskets were lightly oiled.

    ;-)

    -Colin
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