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GM News, New Models and Market Share

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  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    edited January 2013
    I would classify the Corvair as a failure. It's arguably unjustified thanks to Ralph Nader, but the car did have some issues (the swing axle didn't help), and GM completely abandoned flat engines.

    The second gen was better, but by then, between Nader, the swing-axle reputation, and GM's habit of self-competition (the Camaro was cannibalizing Corvair sales) the game was up.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,349
    I've read that some more 'esteemed' brands with swing axles were even worse than the first Corvairs in that same issue. I much-prefer the '65 and later in every way, when that wasn't an issue, anyway.
  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    I like the styling of the second-gen and I like flat engines, primarily because they lower center-of-gravity, which leads to improved handling (without over-stiffening the suspension). But unless you can get serious economies of scale flat engines are a little expensive to make.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    I've heard that as long as you kept the tire pressure in check, early Corvairs were just fine. Only problem is, recommended tire pressure was something off-beat, like 15 psi in the front, and 26 in the rear. People tend to round off, so most owners probably just inflated all four to 25 or 30 psi and called it a day.

    This was long before my time, but I heard that one of my neighbors had an early Corvair, and wiped out in the rain. I don't think the end result was anything serious, but she got rid of it right after that. Of course, being in the rain, and adding in possible driver error and whatever other circumstances there were, she might have wiped out anyway, regardless of what she was driving.

    The only car I can remember her having was a white 1978 or so Regal, that she had right up until she passed away in 1996 or 1997.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I had thought Rabbit quality was hit and miss - some were horrors (early cars esp), others had little issue. Kind of a VW theme that persists almost to this day.

    My paternal grandfather had several Corvairs, didn't turn him off Chevy as he owned several more of the brand, including his last new car.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,349
    Honestly, I never knew anyone who owned a Rabbit, just heard/read a lot of stuff. I'm sure it was the early ones, and also the ones made in Westmoreland County, PA, about 100 miles south of where I lived at the time.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    edited January 2013
    had thought Rabbit quality was hit and miss - some were horrors (early cars esp), others had little issue. Kind of a VW theme that persists almost to this day.

    My great uncle kept an early 80's diesel rabbit at his winter home in Sarasota. He still had it down there when he passed away in the late 90's. He and my aunt would drive down there in his Town Car then use the Rabbit as a runabout and he would lend it to ever would visit (assuming they could drive a stick). Last I was it in the mid '90's it had 150k miles or so and ran great. But yeah, in general VW's seem hit or miss.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,349
    I have heard the same Honda ad several times yesterday and today.

    It's poking fun, kind of, about Hyundai's long warranty. The salesman keeps saying "Our warranty is long, long, long!". The customer says, "Will it fix faulty logic?". Goofing on a long warranty is the entire ad.

    I didn't like it at all. IMHO, it's arrogant. Anybody who's considering a new Honda who hasn't had one before, won't have to look here real hard to find reasons that a long warranty is a good thing. ;)
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    When I was a little kid, a friend of the family had a diesel Rabbit - I remember it for the emblem, and the noise. Apparently it was a reliable vehicle.

    I have heard the very early Rabbits rust with a vengeance, and are unreliable.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    edited January 2013
    It's poking fun, kind of, about Hyundai's long warranty. The salesman keeps saying "Our warranty is long, long, long!". The customer says, "Will it fix faulty logic?". Goofing on a long warranty is the entire ad.

    That's funny! GM has made fun of Ford's "man step" and Honda by showing lawn mowers. BTW, Honda makes far superior lawn mowers than GM;)

    We've been down this warranty road before. If I was shopping for a new or used vehicle whether an Accord or any car with a shorter warranty than GM or Hyundai, but I wanted a better warranty. I'd simply buy the manufacturers extended warranty which would be far more comprehensive than what's provided by standard powertrain warranty. Problem solved.

    I guarantee every GM dealer still offers GM extended warranty for coverage above and beyond the standard 3/36 bumper to bumper and 100k powertrain warranty.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    When I was in high school, a friend's older brother had a Rabbit. We were riding in the car and suddenly heard this huge BANG and the lower left hand corner of the car dropped dramatically. The shock tower broke free and punched through the body. My friend's older brother was cursing up a storm that would make Tony Soprano blush.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,349
    I guarantee every GM dealer still offers GM extended warranty for coverage above and beyond the standard 3/36 bumper to bumper and 100k powertrain warranty.

    Oh they definitely do, and frequently try to sell me one, at new car time and afterwards. ;)

    Thirteen cars and 32 years later, I still don't regret never buying one.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    Oh they definitely do, and frequently try to sell me one, at new car time and afterwards. ;)

    IMO, if the powertrain warranty was so great, they wouldn't need to offer more coverage.

    Here's my perspective. If Ford offered the same warranty as GM, I still would have had the same out of pocket costs with my Expedition. The problems I had between 59-90k miles wouldn't have been covered by GM either. Unless GM would have offered "goodwill". Which is always possible, but not something I've ever experienced with Ford or GM.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    Thirteen cars and 32 years later, I still don't regret never buying one.

    I bought an extended warranty on my 2000 Intrepid, a $1205 expense that I never needed to use, once. Its factory warranty at the time was 3/36K bumper to bumper, and after that you were on your own, although I guess emissions were covered for 10/100K, and body rustthrough was probably 5/100K.

    Anyway, this warranty covered the bumper-to-bumper for 5 years/100K miles, with a $200 deductible. It felt good to have, at first, because I blew through the 3/36K part of it in about 13 months. But after that, nothing really broke on the car that was covered by the warranty, or worth it. The thermostat housing, around 51,000 miles, was $210, but I just had my mechanic do that, as he was doing some maintenance stuff on the car, anyway. Also around that timeframe, the door seals started shrinking up, but those weren't covered, and were only about $50 apiece anyway, and could easily be replaced myself. Around 86,000 miles the oil pressure light started coming on, but that was covered under a TSB.

    My driving slowed down in later years, so while the first 36K miles went by in 13 months, I remember it hit 100K on Christmas Eve, 2004, about 5 years, 1 1/2 months after I bought the car.

    They tried to push an extended warranty on me when I bought my Ram, but I know it's not going to get driven enough to make one worth it. I think its powertrain is 5/60K, and bumper to bumper is 3/36K. All the extended warranty packages only pushed it out to 5/100K. At the rate I've been driving, this truck will be lucky to see 30K miles in five years. I've had it almost 4 months, and it's only gone about 1300 miles.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    Thirteen cars and 32 years later, I still don't regret never buying one.

    I'm willing to be you'd still buy a GM car if they didn't offer a warranty at all. Why didn't you buy a Toyota or Nissan back when the offered 5/60k powertrain warranty long before GM or Ford went beyond 36k.

    Likely because you bought the vehicle you wanted despite the warranty deficiency. That's where I'm coming from on the issue.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,349
    I was pretty close, or at 60K, when my Cobalt needed a thermostat. It was covered, along with all new coolant (one thing I won't have to do but was thinking about already). Ford would have covered it, but just barely.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 17,702
    >Honda makes far superior lawn mowers than GM

    What lawnmowers does GM make?

    As for Honda mowers, as the guy that owns one. Fellow across the road had Toros for decades and then decided on a Honda. He buys used Acuras for his vehicles Third season, the lawn guy was using the lawn guy's Toro. The Honda wouldn't work. Same thing happened again this season. I hope neighbor bought an extended warranty with his Honda. Hee, heee. :P

    This message has been approved.

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 17,702
    > GM dealer still offers GM extended warranty for coverage above and beyond the standard 3/36 bumper to bumper and 100k powertrain warranty.

    It's this kind of misinformation that just keeps on being perpetuated about GM. Old habits are hard to break. The Buick I looked at has 4 yr/ 50,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty.

    This message has been approved.

  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    Ok. I should have said Chevy. I believe Lincoln also offers 4/50 bumper to bumper. But that still wouldn't get me to buy a Navigator over an Expedition.
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    I was joking about the lawn mower.
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