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Pontiac Bonneville Water Leaks

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  • vapor29vapor29 Posts: 1
    Hi, looks like I'm having a similar problem. Mine doesn't appear to be from rain though. My 02' Bonne has begun dumping massive amounts of water into the passenger side floor when I run the A/c and make left hand turns. Any help, picture, etc would be appreciated.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    Since you don't mention water from the outside like rain, yours sounds like the drain on the AC evaporator is stopped up. Put the car up on blocks or a lift or something solid and crawl under. On the firewall down low you should find a tube that's the drain to the AC box. It will have a flattened end to keep it closed except when water weight inside pushes through.

    Insert a coat hanger into the bottom end and you'll probably get a gush of stuff coming out that was blocking it.
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    Hi imidazol97,

    You have given some great advice.

    I have a 2002 Bonneville with sunroof, and have water leaks under passenger seat and rear floor. I dropped the headliner (it needed to come out anyway for recovering) and blew out the four drain hoses on sunroof. They were all blocked. The two rear tubes exit just in front of the rear wheels and the two front ones appear to dump into the lower door sill and then drain out from there. Now they all run fine except the driver's front side. (I test poured water down the tubes to check) Nothing is coming out, and there is dampness on the emergency brake cable and wiring harness. Another post indicated this tube could be misrouted, but I can't find where the tube is behind the instrument panel. Can you help.

    Also, I think I have one door inner seal that must be leaking too. Can you send info on that as well.

    Thanks
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    Steve,

    I have a problem with the sun roof drain tube on my driver's side front too. It doesn't seem to be draining to the outside. I blew it out with an airhose, and it is clear - that isn't the problem. I ran water down it as a test, and it disappeared - it just didn't come out the bottom of the car like the other three tubes did when I tested them. I pulled up the carpet partially and found seepage on the parking brake cable and wiring harness. But I didn't find the drain tube. There is a heavy rubber mat under the carpet on the firewall that is held down with pins. Do I have to lift that to find the tube, or how do I determine if the tube is positioned properly?

    Thanks for the help.
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    Hi imidazol97
    I am a newby on the site, and have a number of Pontiac Bonneville water leak issues. I tried to find your picture-rich help guide for drain tube repairs but didn't have any luck. I went to your carspace but didn't see a link to the guide. Help!!

    Thanks
  • 05gxp4605gxp46 Posts: 1
    hi out there, has anyone else had water leaking into their trunks? i have an 05 bonneville gxp and every time it rains i get water in the trunk and it pools up in the basin where the spare tire sits.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    Check your carspace email box.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    >heavy rubber mat under the carpet

    It looks like you have to find the right place to cut a chunk out of that mat to find the place where the tube goes through and out behind the front wheel inside the wheelwell housing.
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    I found a very detailed posting of how to repair the sunroof drain tubes. The front tubes are the most McGivered devices you can imagine. Instead of being one continuous tube, they are sectioned and joined behind a heavy rubber mat that is pinned to the firewall (underneath the carpet). As soon as you blow out the tubes to clear them, they separate at this section. The only way to access the location where the joint is located, is by cutting an access flap into the heavy rubber mat. The detailed posting with very clear pictures showing how this is done is unfortunately not in this forum. you can find it at (www.pontiacbonnevilleclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=43&t=1688) Study the pics carefully to figure out where to cut the access flaps. On the driver's side, you will have to remove the parking brake. And use a hose clamp so they don't come off again. Agggg!

    Unhapping ending: Before I found this post, all I knew was that the water was draining behind the heavy rubber mat rather than outside. It was a black box mystery - because you simply can't remove the mat to inspect. And without knowledge or a shop manual you are lost. So, I finally gave up and took my car to the dealer. They charged me 3 hours labor so you know this isn't an easy job and they ended up slicing the mat just like the posting describes. A day later I found this posting with the clear pics. Turns out I had already done most of the work.

    Another tip. the underside of the carpet is coated with a thick foam material that really sponges up the water. So don't expect that it is going to dry by itself. The best solution is to remove the carpet and sun dry it, reverse side up (per the Pontiac Tech) but what I am trying is to create an airspace by placing some plastic bottles under the carpet and sqeezing the foam like you would wring out a sponge. I figure that with AC on, it will eventually dry if you allow the air to circulate. Also, park on a sloped driveway, with the back end downhill ( keep your rear carpet elevated off the floorboard) Gravity will pull the water toward the back seat floorboard area where you can mop it out. And keep wringing the foam on the back floor carpet. It will get fresh water in it, as it runs down hill. A few days of this will get rid of most of the water. The Pontiac Tech tells me that the carpet doesn't like to naturally wick the water out of the foam to the surface, so don't expect it to just dry out by itself. You will be shocked at how much water wrings out of the foam. It can absorb well over a quart on each side.
  • Same problem with water leaks in the door. Can you also send me pictures of the inside of the door and instructions on how to remove the door without damagaing the clips? Thanks.
  • gesepsgeseps Posts: 3
    I have a 2002 Pontiac Bonneville, the windows work intermittently and I believe this is due to shorts probably caused by moisture somewhere around one of the wiring harnesses. I'm just not sure where. Took it to the dealer where they evidently replaced a wiring clip so the drivers side window works regularly now. They recommended to replace the other window motors, but I think they are fine. Anyone know where these wires run that might get exposed to water? The posts in this forum seem to support my theory. Any help out there with this?
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    I finally came up with the perfect solution to the sunroof and door water leaks in my Pontiac. I had searched for days trying to find all the leaks. It got really frustrating. So what I finally ended up doing solved the problem.

    1) I removed all the old soggy carpet with the sponges stuck to the underside and threw it away.
    2) I then coated the entire floorboard with Rhinocoat. Looks real good, and gives the car a real custom appearance.
    3) I re-routed all the sunroof drain tubes through the headliner so they now empty into a bucket that I keep in the back seat. (I am considering switching to beer cans in the rear cup holders for a more professional finish)
    4) I have flip flops for all the passengers so they can dangle their toes in the water while we drive.
    5) Every so often I toss a couple of shovelfuls of sand onto the floorboards. Makes everyone feel like they are at the beach.

    Why didn't GM think of this great idea? :D
  • Can you please email me this info too?

    Thanks.
  • Can you send me the pictures you received from imidazo197 on the water leak in the Pontiac? You can email me at knalevanko@comcast.net.

    Thanks.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    Please check your carspace page. It's link is in the upper left corner of most pages here, "My Carspace."
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    Did you find a solution yet? I had serious water accumulation in my trunk and spare tire well. Turned out the problem was the sunroof drain tubes leading to the rear of the car had separated from their external extension tubes. The connection point is located behind the grey matting, to the rear of the wheel wells on either side of the trunk. The extension tubes may be blocked with road debris, so check them with a wire before putting it back together. The connection point is quite accessable after removing the grey matting on the trunk sides (held on with a couple of large black plastic plug-type clips.)
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    I blew out the sunroof drains with a pressure hose, because they were all blocked. They flowed fine after that. Problem was, they flowed right into the car and trunk, because GM had seen fit to put connections on the hoses where they pass from inside to outside the car. The pressure hose had blown out all four connections. Two are in the trunk - easy to reach, just remove the grey matting on the side of the trunk and they are there right behind the wheel well. Two in front are really difficult. They are on the driver and passenger firewall kick-plate and are behind a heavy, black, un-removable rubber mat. Have to cut access flaps to get to the connection points. See my earlier post for website info.

    The tale continues. I thought the carpets would just dry out and it would be over. Not so. They smell. So, I have to remove them, and get the mildew out of them. (Living in FL, I will just toss them in the pool. Chlorine works wonders) So I have removed the seats and am struggling with the center console.

    Need help here. Took out the obvious two bolts at the rear of the console, and now it lifts freely from the rear. But the front is still firmly attached to the IP and I can't find any more attachments to remove. Must be clipped somehow, but I don't want to tug or pull too hard in case I break something. Advice?

    Thanks
  • kts0347kts0347 Posts: 44
    I also posted a question in the Q&A section and got a great answer from Doc J. So now my console is out, and carpets removed. To document how to remove the console here are the steps:
    1) Remove Instrument Panel Cluster Bezel Trim. (start with two button clips on underside of upper edge of trim panel, then the rest is just push in clips. Whole bezel right down to the radio cover comes off as one piece.
    2) Remove the small trim panel remaining that contains the emergency flasher. (unclip harnesses and pull out and up)
    3) Remove four bolts holding console to Dash Panel
    4) Lift panel surrounding shift lever and rotate 90 degrees for access. Take care with clips here, fragile.
    5) Unclip main harness connection
    6) Unclip Shift lever cable (slip on fitting) and remove from retainer
    7) Unclip Shift Lockout lever cable (remove yellow retaining cap and disconnect) and remove from retainer.
    8) Remove two bolts holding console to floor near rear of console
    9) Lift back and up. Route harnerss and cables through front opening.

    This presumes you have already removed the seats. To remove bucket seats you need a star socket. I bought one as part of a three piece brake caliper removal kit for $2.99 at Harbor Freight. Four star bolts hold seats in position. Tilt seats backward and disconnect power seat harnesses. Remove through back door.

    Carpets now lift out freely.

    Mine are going into the pool with an extra dose of clorine to clear them of the mildew. While I have them out, I am going to finish reconnecting the front drain tubes (as per the web page above) and also do the door trim resealing as I have leaks there as well.

    Then everything goes back together (hopefully).
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    I had wondered about treating wet carpets with one of the products for longterm mold and mildew recurrance prevention. I think they sell one at Home Depot and I have been tempted to buy one online at killmoldfast --it's called sporiclean . The have a small sample size and a larger quantity.

    I believe the one at Home Depot is Corundum or something like that. You let it dry on the item to be protected. I have a suspicion it leaves a mineral trace behind with the enzyme on it to maintain long term prevention. It was in the paint department.

    it might be worth a try while you've got the carpet out. Chlorine is not considered to kill all the mold. They repeat that on housing shows (This Old House) about killing mold problems.
  • I have a 2003 Bonneville that leaks. It is like a lot of the rest of you I have water on the drivers and passengers front floor but no water on the sides of the carpet. Can whoever has the pics on how to remove the door panel send them to me? My email is lmaher63@yahoo.com. Thanks!
  • Hi imaher63,

    I have just removed my door panels today (for the second time) I will attach the detailed instructions on how to do this so it will be easily available in this forum.

    Here is the simple version.
    1) Don't try this without a set of trim removal tools. I bought a set at Harbor Freight for $5 and they work like a charm. Forget about the special tools mentioned below. Just go buy a set of the plastic trim removal tools (they look like various shaped pry bars and miniature crow bars). Don't get the wimpy ones, they will just bend instead of popping out the fasteners.

    2) Start by removing the door handle trim. It is held in with four clips. Pry gently on the top and the top ones will release. There is a tab at the rear edge, so remove the trim plate up and forward. Pull the door handle out to make it easy to remove. Unclip the wire harness and set the piece aside.

    3) Next remove the tweeter trim on the inside of the ORVmirror. Pry from the top. There is a push clip. Then rotate gently out. There are two plastic tabs on the bottom and rear - don't break. Unclip the wire harness and set the pieces aside.

    4) The door panel is held on by a series of push pins surrounding the sides and bottom. These should be popped out with a pry tool, starting from one edge near the bottom, and working slowing around. They have foam washers to prevent rattling. Retain.

    5) After the push pins are popped, the panel should be lifted up and to remove. It is still attached in two places, and these are freed up by lifting. The first is a lip on the top edge that fits over a metal strip on the door inner panel. The second is two clips that provide support for the armrest grip. They slide out of grooves on the door inner by lifting up.

    Disconnect the main wire harness at the blue connection and the panel is free.

    To reassemble:

    1) Remove the two armrest clips from the door trim panel using a needle nose pliers to compress them. Don't squeeze too hard, you gotta use them again. Slip these clips into the brackets mounted on the door inner. (Now they are positioned so you can just press the door panel onto them to secure)

    2) Reattach the main wire harness connection.

    3) Hang the door panel on the top metal strip.

    4) Ensure the clips are all in position on the door trim, and not stuck in the door itself. Two longer clips go on the lower edge and act as the pilot for re installation. Put all the clips into the respective holes before seating any of them. Then position the two armrest clips into their respective holes. Now that everything is lined up, seat all the clips.

    5) Reinstall the tweeter.

    6) Reinstall the door handle trim. Pull the door handle out to allow the trim to seat itself, beginning at the rear.

    What's behind the trim?

    The most McGiver'd waterproofing solution I have ever seen. Water runs down the window channel into the door. There are weep holes along the bottom edge of the door for it to escape. However, there are lots of large openings on the door inner. These are sealed by a large formed piece of polyethylene that is "glued" to the door inner with a band of black mastic. Water obviously runs down the inside face of this polyethylene, because the door inner has several drain holes to allow the water to run back into the door. The mastic is applied so that these drain holes are in low spots. Well, that's the theory. But after several years of baking in the sun, the polyethylene tends to "wave" and the mastic releases (usually in those low spots where the drain holes are located). So, instead of draining back into the door, the water just flows downward, past the lower edge of the door trim and inside of the door weatherstrip. This seems to happen near the trailing edge of the door, and from there it goes under the sill plate, under the carpet, and usually ends up puddling in the rear foot well.

    I said I had removed my door trims twice. The first time I just pressed hard on the polyethylene to try to reseal the mastic. It looked good and I put it back together. Next rainfall I sat in the car and watched two rivulets of water flowing from each of the front doors (my rears don't seem to be leaking). So today off came the panels again, and I am going to get more aggressive with sealing the polyethylene. I got clear RTV silicone at AutoZone. I am going to try to adhere these sheets to the door inner once and for all.

    I got the RTV silicone for a second reason too. I also have water leaks in my trunk. Inspection indicates two areas. 1) There is a small opening in the factory sealing of the sheet metal near the right tail light. This is just a quality problem and a little sealer will take care of it. 2) The tail lights, center reflector bar, spoiler, and a filler plate at the lower edge of the trunk are all attached with bolts that penetrate the trunk compartment. They are sealed with washers that have a mastic on them. Water seems to be coming in from some of these. I thought a dab of silicone on each would stop that.

    Mold: My carpets had some visible mildew so I removed them for cleaning. I have a swimming pool so the first step was to wash and soak them thoroughly in chlorinated pool water ( 5 ppm) This cleaned them up nicely. Then I took Imadol's advice and went looking for Concrobium. I found it at Lowes, It is in a 32 oz spray bottle and consists of 1% Sodium Carbonate and 99% water. Cost $9. I sprayed it on both the upper and lower surfaces of the carpets. Instructions are to let it soak in and dry. No color fading no residue. no mold.

    Rust: My floor was rusty in the rear foot wells and particularly in the battery tray, which seemed to hold the majority of the water. I wanted a simple, and not necessarily perfect cosmetic solution. Turns out there are products that transform rust into a hard black crystaline material that can be painted. One product is called "Rust Doctor" and is available on the internet but only in gallon jugs. My application was much smaller, and I found that hardware stores carry a number of similar products. I bought Permatex Rust Treatment for $8 because it comes in a 10 Oz spray can and I could spray it into some of the seams and openings on the floor. These products need to be covered with a surface coat of non-latex paint to prevent rust from recurring. Rustoleum or equivalent will work fine.

    Here are the detailed instructions for the door trim.

    There are also some drawings that didn't want to copy, so they don't appear below. If you want to see the instructions including the drawings go to: http://www.pontiacbonnevilleclub.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=253&p=1301&hilit- =how+to+remove+door+trim#p1301

    Trim Panel Replacement - Side Front Door

    Tools Required
    J 36796 Clip Zip Tool
    J 38778 Door Trim Pad Clip Remover

    Removal Procedure
    Remove the inside door handle bezel. The front inside do
  • Looks like the detailed instructions didn't all copy. Here they are repeated.

    Trim Panel Replacement - Side Front Door

    Tools Required
    J 36796 Clip Zip Tool
    J 38778 Door Trim Pad Clip Remover

    Removal Procedure
    Remove the inside door handle bezel. The front inside door handle bezel has electrical connectors, the rear does not.

    Insert a flat bladed tool behind the forward upper edge of the door handle bezel.
    Gently pry the upper portion of the bezel away from the door trim panel.

    Pull the bezel forward over the inside door handle.
    Disconnect the electrical connector.

    Remove the upper door trim panel.
    Use the J 38778 in order to release the retainer at the top of the upper door trim panel.
    Lift the upper door trim panel upwards in order to remove.
    Disconnect the wire harness to the tweeter.

    Use the J 36796 in order to release the retainers around the outside edges of the door trim panel. Start at the bottom and work around.

    Starting at the bottom rear of the door trim panel pull inwards, while lifting upwards in order to remove.
    Disconnect the door trim panel wiring harness.

    Remove the armrest pull cup retainers from the inside of the door trim panel.
    Use needle nose pliers to compress the 360 clip.
    Pull the 360 clip out of the nylon nut on the door trim panel.

    Installation Procedure

    Install the 360 clip retainers into the nylon nuts on the inner door panel.
    Connect the door wire harness to the door trim panel wire harness.

    Starting at the bottom, secure the door trim panel around the outside edges with the retainers (2).
    Align the door trim panel to the 360 clip retainers (1).
    Snap the retainers in to secure the center of the door trim panel to the inner door panel.
    Pull on the armrest to assure proper fit.
    Push outwards near the top of the door trim panel in order to snap the top door trim panel retainer into the channel in the window inner belt seal strip.
    Install the inside door handle bezel.

    Connect the electrical connectors, if any, to the inside door handle bezel.
    Guide the inside door handle through the opening in the door handle bezel.
    Snap the door handle bezel into place.
    Work the rubber around and behind both the manual lock knob and the inside door handle.

    Install the upper door trim panel (1).
    Connect the wire harness to the tweeter.
    Insert the tabs into the slots on the door trim panel.
    Insert the retainer into the hole in the door frame.

    Trim Panel Replacement - Side Rear Door

    Tools Required
    J 36796 Clip Zip Tool

    Removal Procedure

    Remove the inside door handle bezel. The front inside door handle bezel has electrical connectors, the rear does not.

    Insert a flat bladed tool behind the forward upper edge of the door handle bezel.
    Gently pry the upper portion of the bezel away from the door trim panel.

    Pull the bezel forward over the inside door handle.
    Disconnect the electrical connector.

    Use the J 36796 in order to release the retainers around the outside edges of the door trim panel.

    Rock the door trim panel (1) upwards, starting at the rear, while lifting upwards to remove.
    Disconnect the door trim panel wiring harness.

    Remove the armrest pull cup retainers from the inside of the door trim panel.
    Use needle nose pliers to compress the 360 clip.
    Pull the 360 clip out of the nylon nut on the door trim panel.

    Installation Procedure

    Install the 360 clip to the nylon nuts on the inner door panel by sliding the 360 clip down into the grooves in the nylon nuts.
    Connect the trim panel electrical connector to the door wiring harness connector.

    Starting at the bottom, secure the door trim panel around the outside edges with the retainers (2).
    Align the door trim panel to the armrest pull cup retainers (1).
    Snap the retainers in to secure the center of the door trim panel to the inner door panel.
    Pull on the armrest to assure proper fit.
    Push outwards near the top of the door trim panel in order to snap the top door trim panel retainer into the channel in the window inner belt seal strip.
    Install the inside door handle bezel.

    Connect the electrical connectors, if any, to the inside door handle bezel.
    Guide the inside door handle through the opening in the door handle bezel.
    Snap the door handle bezel into place.
    Work the rubber around and behind both the manual lock knob and the inside door handle.

    Install the upper door trim panel (1).
    Connect the wire harness to the tweeter.
    Insert the tabs into the slots on the door trim panel.
    Insert the retainer into the hole in the door frame.
  • ive read up on the common water leaks with these cars and i dont think any of those apply. this is on my moms car its a 01 bonneville. she had water standing in the floor so i stop by take a look, pass side is standing in water. so i start looking around all the molding seems good but sprayed down all the windows and doors just in case, which hasnt even rained here since i can remember anyways, the car doesnt have a sunroof so thats out, so i start the car and run the a/c pull the carpet back and suck out all the water and dont see any signs of a leak. the car was facing down hill, turn the car around facing up hill with car running, a/c on it started pouring water in the floor, but doenst seem to be coolant feels like straight water. i was thinking condensation from HVAC box under dash, but i dont think there would be that much condensation. i am supposed to take a better look at it this weekend, so any help is great. also when the car was running it was a steady drip in the floor cut the car off and it started pouring out. this cant be an outside water leak as i said its been very dry here and my dad keeps sucking the water out of the floor but its keeps coming back.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    Is the drain line for the evaporator inside the AC open? You'll have to get under the car to look up from below to find it. Run a piece of string trimmer line up into it.
  • i dont know yet, like i said im going to take a look at it this weekend i just stopped by the other night and wasnt in crawling around on the ground clothes. thats all i could figure is the line is stopped up, but i just found it hard to believe there is that much condensation coming out of it. plus she said she hasnt been running the air since i told her not to and its still there but i think she has been cause i cant imagine my mom riding around without a/c. thats unheard of, lol. i just wanted to see if any had this problem before i didnt want to get into it and have to take the box out for some reason.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    I believe you'll need jackstands to support the car up a little to allow room to crawl under to find the outlet. But if the water doesn't smell like antifreeze, that's a good thing.

    You'll want to try to suck the water out of the carpet and the underlayment with a good shop vacuum. Some people take out the carpet to get it dried. You might try a mold preventative treatment that they're marketing at home depot and lowes in the paint department. Corundum or something like that. It's an enzyme using a carbonate salt as a carrier to hold it after it dries in place. Another is sporiclean at killmoldfast.com I think is the site.
  • yes i know ill need jackstands. im not a complete idiot lol. never messed with a pontiac just wanted to see if anyone ran into this or any other suggestions before i work on it. ill check into that mold stuff though im sure her car needs it, since she waited about a month to say anything, and another month has gone by and she is just now going to bring it over. but my dad has been sucking the water out of the floor from time to time, so well see i may just go ahead and take it out and clean it.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,079
    Let us know when you open the drain for the AC and if that was the problem...

    I was hoping everyone knows to use jackstands for crawling under... but I don't want to have someone find out the hard way.
  • it is toward the inside of the carpet
  • Just wanted to post that my problems are solved. I removed the front door trims and found the polyethylene liners inside to be warped and un-stuck from the mastic. I re-seated them and sealed up the entire lower portion with clear silicone. It works. I used the same clear silicone in the trunk. Found that several of the attaching nuts/combo washers that hold on the spoiler, center reflector and a filler panel at the top edge of the bumper cover had loosened over time. They have a mastic gasket that had dried out. I removed the mastic, made a silicone gasket and re-seated them. No more leaks. It's all going back together today. Hurray.
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