Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Ford Escape Hybrid Battery Pack Questions

2

Comments

  • mecheng1mecheng1 Posts: 161
    "Computer has been checked out..", does that mean it has no DTCs or diagnostic codes stored? A dealer or a mechanic with an OBD II tester should be able to search the computer brain of the vehicle for "errors" or "out of range" readings the computer has seen.
  • grecnigrecni Posts: 3
    I've been having this exact same problem for months with my 06. After 1/2 hour or less of driving the vehicle will no longer go into EV mode. I've taken it into the local Ford dealer and the "hybrid" expert states there is nothing in the computer and "this is normal behavior", which I know from 3 years of driving that this is nothing like normal. Unfortunately if the computer doesn't tell him what to do he has no idea how to think independently and troubleshoot.
  • grecnigrecni Posts: 3
    tpaul, Were you ever able to get this problem resolved?
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,732
    "I've been having this exact same problem for months with my 06. After 1/2 hour or less of driving the vehicle will no longer go into EV mode."

    I'm not sure you want to go to this much trouble, but you might buy a ScanGuage 2 and hook it up. It has setting for hybrid vehicles and you can program it to tell you things like the battery state of charge & etc. If the battery stops taking a charge that would be information to take to the dealer.

    Also, I have heared of some people having issues with the battery door not opening correctly, although this is supposed to throw a computer code. If the battery is not receiving air or A/C, it may be too hot. The ScanGuage can tell you a lot of info, plus it can read computer codes if they occur.

    I'm currently saving my pennies to buy one...
  • grecnigrecni Posts: 3
    Well I called the service manager at my local Ford Dealer and expained why there really was a problem. I brought the vehicle back in and let it running until I could bring the hybrid specialist out to see it. It was in the mid 70's, the air was off, the vehicled parked and not in EV mode. He agreed it was not working properly.

    The next day they called and said it was the battery pack, that it was not recharging properly and they were ordering a replacement. It will be mid next week before it arrives and it get installed but at least this is a step in the right direction.

    Luckily the battery pack is still under warranty because they said it was a $10,000 part.
  • alice612alice612 Posts: 1
    according to FORD PR people - I am the first consumer to have a ford escape hybrid battery die on me- I have 120 thousand miles on my car. Its 4 years old. One day last week a triangle with an exclamation mark popped up and the message was- pull over safely- I turned off the car and when I turned it on again the message disappeared- this happened 4 more times for the next 50 miles till I got to my Ford dealer- 165 dollars and an hour later I was told the battery was going and it would cost $8,000.00 to replace. but that I could still drive the car safely to Manhatten the next day- Thats about 200 miles round trip. I was told that when the battery starts to go the engine takes over and when the little red triangle comes back on to keep driving. I wonder why no one knew that when the little red triangle comes on if you don't pull over the gas pedal no longer works- I went from 60 to zero by the time I crossed 4 lanes of traffic. I called the service manager who knew that would happen, I have yet to get an answer on why his service people are so poorly trained. I called Ford and they told me I was the first person to ever have a battery die, that there are cabs with 350 thousand miles on them still going strong - If thats the case then what happened to my battery?- they are getting back to me- I keep asking the same question, how long should the battery last and at what point do you decide its time to get rid of your car. One Ford person explained that the warrenty covered the battery up to 100 thousand miles. So I asked, does that mean that at 100 thousand miles you should consider getting rid of the car? The answer was no. I asked what is the threshold, what is the benchmark for these batteries, no one knows, but my Ford dealer was told there was nothing Ford could or would do to help me. Its 8 thousand bucks for a new battery. I think consumers deserve better answers than this.
    I would really appreciate some feedback.
  • bdymentbdyment Posts: 549
    I am afraid you have discovered the main weakness with all hybrids, not just the Escape. The battery. As a hybrid gets older when do you trade it? Who knows for sure. Many variables enter into the equation. What will be the trade in value of a hybrid that is near the end of its battery life? Not much I'll wager.
  • bow45bow45 Posts: 21
    Hello~ alice612.

    Before I read your post I was considering 2010 Ford Fusion Hybrid for my wife’s next car but after I read your post, I think Volkswagen Jetta TDI is the way to go. :confuse:

    I currently drive a 2008 Ford Escape Hybrid AWD with 42,000 miles on it and am having a Reverse Sensing System problem. I also had a Wrench Light issue because of a bad Aux Mode Door Actuator. I’m little disappointed with the quality of my Escape. :sick:

    Please keep post what ‘s happening.

    Thank you and good luck.
  • imcooknimcookn Posts: 7
    I just bought a '07 FEH with 90K on it under the theory that the mileage was done on highway travel and the HV battery had minimal charging during this period. What can I estimate the battery life? This car was driven in southern climates.

    :)
  • bow45bow45 Posts: 21
    Recently I read an article about the Prius batteries in Car and Driver, May 09, Vol. 54, No.11.

    It says "Toyota sells replacement Prius batteries for about $2,300 and the company pays a $200 "bounty" for the goopy old dead ones." :surprise:

    FYI.
  • imcooknimcookn Posts: 7
    That is very interesting. Did you know that Ford is demo testing Escape Hybrids with an additional battery for plug-in operation? I did find that Flex fuel models have also been evaluated I think in California. Now if they could include operation with Natural Gas that would be great! :)
  • mseitz1mseitz1 Posts: 1
    Did you ever get any resolution to this problem? I have an '06 Escape Hybrid and it is doing the same kind of thing you described. My local mechanic has punted and is passing the buck to a nearby Ford dealer. My local mechanic 'thinks its either the battery or the computer' but after reading all this on the Escape Hybrid I'm thinking it's the battery. My only hope at this point is that the mileage is only 96,000 and we're supposed to be under extended warranty. I don't want to think about Ford coping out and telling me I have an $8,000-$10,000 repair ahead.

    How was your situation handled?
  • imcooknimcookn Posts: 7
    Please take a look at Wikipedia's article about nickel-metal-hydride batteries. It notes that virtually all the hybrid vehicles are using NMH batteries. I have not heard of any major problems with Toyota, Honda, etc.

    As I suspected the article points out that the life of the battery is largely dependent on how it is charged and the handling of their temperature. Most of us probably thought that the job of the computer was to handle the balance between the electric and gasoline power sources. While it does do that, more importantly with regard to the batteries, it handles the recharging of the batteries and control of temperature. That said, there should be a method to check to see if the CPU is doing a correct job. There may even be a monitoring program with history that could be viewed.

    I will spend some time to see what the IEEE publications report about this since I am a lifetime member.
  • You might check a TSB for this (battery problem msg on dash display). I found out about one that fixes a false positive with a battery problem. It seems that something is wrong with the harness (they replace it for free up until August 09) and, if not repaired, can give the exact same symptoms that you describe even tho there is not really any problem. This TSB is not one that notifies owners -- you have to find out about it yourself.
    Check it out.
  • ajsparkajspark Posts: 1
    This reply is re: alice612's post:

    "according to FORD PR people - I am the first consumer to have a ford escape hybrid battery die on me- I have 120 thousand miles on my car. Its 4 years old. One day last week a triangle with an exclamation mark popped up and the message was- pull over safely- I turned off the car and when I turned it on again the message disappeared- this happened 4 more times for the next 50 miles till I got to my Ford dealer- 165 dollars and an hour later I was told the battery was going and it would cost $8,000.00 to replace."

    I second both the last post and the one before it, regarding the recall for the HV battery harness and the necessity for temperature control.

    I purchased a 2005 FEH with 37K this past December (becoming its 3rd owner) and it now has just over 40K. Within a month of buying it, I got the message "Stop Safely Now" on the display, and one morning it just plain wouldn't start. We replaced the regular battery (which is a special "low voltage" battery, available only from Ford dealers for over $100). That fixed the problem (but I sure I wish I'd known about the DC-to-DC downconverter that's covered by the 100K warranty - that may have been the problem, and will have it checked Monday to make sure it's working).

    Anyway -- two days ago, while driving on (Thank God) a deserted 2-lane freeway with shoulders, 30 miles from my destination, the engine stalled with the aforementioned red triangle and exclamation mark. I coasted off to the shoulder, switched off the engine, sat for 10 seconds, turned the key, it started. 5 minutes later, same thing. Every five minutes, or even less, I was pulling off, turning off, turning on, continuing. SAME SYMPTOMS AS ALICE612.

    I noticed that my HV battery charge was pretty low, however. So I decided to try just driving on the shoulder at a lower speed to charge the HV battery, but then the engine got too hot. So I let it cool, went back onto the freeway at normal speed. I made it to my destination after 6 or 8 pullovers, and called the local Ford dealership.

    The Ford dealer immediately said, "Were you aware that THERE'S A RECALL for your FEH? STALLING ISSUES ALMOST ALWAYS INDICATE THAT THE RECALL WORK HASN'T BEEN DONE YET." They apparently notified the original owner (see link below), but he either didn't tell the 2nd owner, or 2nd owner failed to inform me.

    I made arrangements to take it in the next day (i.e. yesterday), with the understanding that, if the recall work hadn't been done yet, it would take a half-day to do that (they need to pull out the HV battery to replace the harness). The diagnostics would cost about $150, and if my problem was JUST the harness, I wouldn't even have to pay that.

    He called me a few hours after I took it in, with "good news and bad news". Good news, the recall work hadn't been done yet, but was done now. Bad news, that wasn't my only problem. I had 2 other issues: 1) the HV battery needs to be vented to keep the temperature down, and the pump wasn't working. 2) there's an "actuator" that senses the system's status and controls the various components, and it wasn't working, either.

    So my problem was multi-faceted, maybe more complex than yours.

    There's more info and good discussion here:
    http://tinyurl.com/l9s3p4

    Bottom line: FIND A FORD DEALER THAT KNOWS HYBRIDS, and can give you a knowledgeable analysis of your $165 diagnostic readout. And make sure you get that recall work done ASAP. Good luck!
  • bow45bow45 Posts: 21
    I recently found out that Ford Extended Service Plan (ESP), even with the most expensive plan (PremiumCARE), doesn't cover high-voltage battery :confuse: (it does cover other hybrid engine components though). So Ford ESP is useless in this regard. :sick:

    Does anyone know the aftermarket extended warranties that cover high-voltage battery?

    Thanks. :)
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,732
    "I recently found out that Ford Extended Service Plan (ESP), even with the most expensive plan (PremiumCARE), doesn't cover high-voltage battery (it does cover other hybrid engine components though). So Ford ESP is useless in this regard.

    Does anyone know the aftermarket extended warranties that cover high-voltage battery? "

    The traction battery carries a federal warranty of a minimum of 8yr/100K, and 10 yr/150K in CARB states. That is longer than the ESP runs under most circumstances. So there is no point in having it covered under ESP.
  • >> After 1/2 hour or less of driving the vehicle will no longer go into EV mode.

    I've had this same problem, twice. 2005 4WD 56K miles. The first time it was the air conditioning compressor, the second the rear AC line. The compressor was covered under ESP, but the rear AC line was an uncovered $750 repair.

    The AC is required to keep the battery cool when outside temps get above 65 or so. When it overheats it goes into a 'limp-home' mode until it cools again. That's what you're seeing, but maybe not for the same reason.

    I'm trying to convince Ford that if a part is vital to keep the hybrid operating, it should be covered under the hybrid warranty. Ford won't sell a hybrid without AC, for this very reason.

    Wish me luck, I wish you the same.
  • wisillwisill Posts: 9
    Your posted message indicates your electronic coolant pump (found on the passenger side of the engine compartment not far from the hood brackets and is black in color and a little bigger than a soda can) has failed--a known issue with these vehicles after 50,000 miles. The second issue is the blend door acutator failure. This is the device found on the driver's side of the rear cargo area that opens and closes the vent on the drivers side rear cargo window. This is a known issue also. The hybrid battery is designed to be maintained at a certain temperature and if it goes out of specification, the vehicle can go into limp mode.

    Other owners have reported on these issues at other forums.
  • bartbbartb Posts: 2
    hello
    just got back from FOMOCO about the same problem, the vehicle shut down without notice, a stop vehicle safely, message came on. got it to dealer the cooling pump for the ev computer had burnt out (not covered) I asked how can this be, It got to hot was the answer I checked around in the manual to find out about a cooling unit for the pack in the rear. On the outside drivers side rear disguised as part of the rear window is a vent, this give fresh air to the battery what the fail to tell you is that there is a filter about 6x4" that fills with all sorts of stuff, it is located inside on drivers side upper quarter panel there are 2 covers to remove (snaps in/out) and there is at least some of the problem. It is refered to as a cabin filter. The dealer didnt even check it
2
Sign In or Register to comment.