Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





BMW 335d 2009+

17891012

Comments

  • nkeennkeen Posts: 316
    I agree -- if it's ultra quiet and ulta smooth you're after then a diesel, however refined, is not going to match the gasoline equivalent.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,916
    I think if one puts it into context, this is a BMW thread. One would be hard pressed to call a BMW 335 I an "entry level" gasser!? It may indeed be an "entry level" BMW. However 44-49k might be pricey, even for BMW enthusiasts.

    I have read in passing the twin turbo diesel is used in both the 335D and 535D (probably 2010 MY here, but already in Europe). This is not the duel duty of a wimpy power plant! One can check the specifications, but the 535 I has app 105 # ft of torque LESS (300 # ft vs 405 #ft) than its 335D and 535 D stable mates.
  • CCTDI: Would you recommend driving the 335d in Wisconsin during winter? We are moving up there, and I have been looking at the Audi A4 Quadro 2.0T and the 335xi. I don't like the run-flat tires on the 335xi for the central Wisconsin roads, and so we are leaning towards the Audi A4. I have always loved diesel engines, and when the 335d was first announced I knew I had to get one. But now that we are relocating to central Wisconsin, I don't know if it will be okay and wise to own the 335d. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated? Thanks.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,035
    There is a chance that Audi will bring the 2010 A4 Quattro wagon with TDI to the states. It is a crossover with a little higher clearance according to the article I read. It should get about the same MPG as the Jetta Sportwagen Diesel. That would get me to downsize. I wanted the X5 35D but do not want to deal with Urea.

    image
  • jlbljlbl Posts: 1,333
    Aside from RFTs and snow concerns, the best possible feed-back when driving the tamed beast along 500 miles without refilling is guaranteed. ;)

    Regards,
    Jose
  • cctdicctdi Posts: 82
    Sorry, I haven’t gotten the chance to look the forum in these past few days. To answer your question about the 335D on the snow is an unknown one, I got the car on 27th of March, and I haven’t had a snow day here in South Jersey where I live, beside, I got an AWD 08 RX 400H, I would drive this car on the snowy days. With huge torque on the rear wheels, you got to be very careful to drive the 335D on the snow. I got 07 335xi with RFT, the car was Ok on the snow covered roads, as long as the snow is less than 5” inches, the RFT was quite bumpy, somehow, Bimmer made some progress on RFT on 09 models; the performance RFT on 335D with sport suspension is not as bumpy as the 07 model. The A4 AWD should be good on the snowy roads, but, with only 4.2 ground clearance on its bottom how comfortable would you feel to venture on heavy snow weather days? The forum right after yours is a smaller version of Audi Allroad- the A4 Allroad which is a good car for cold climate region like yours. I drove an 04 Allroad 4.2 for a while, I think that car on the picture is equipped with adjustable high suspension on the tap, the bottom of the car can be as high as an SUV, you ought to take a good look at such a vehicle, especially with the TDI.
  • nopcbsnopcbs Posts: 43
    Aside from ground clearance issues, if you put a decent set of snow tires on any RWD sedan equipped with traction control, you simply are not going to have trouble in snow. I have driven a '92 LS400 (big, heavy car) through mid-Michigan winters since 1994 and only got stuck once...and that was an end of the street snow pile up caused by snow plays coming through after a big snow storm. It is simply not an issue unless you get a huge snow fall and NOTING is going to get through short of a tall 4WD truck.
  • Thanks for the replies, CCTDI and NOPCBS. I would love an A4 Avant diesel, but there's no concrete evidence that Audi will bring it over. Some people have said that it may come in 2010. I really like the 335d. Do you think if I put a good set of snow tires on there that it will be okay with 400ft pound of torque going to the rear wheels, NOPCBS? We will be in mid-Wisconsin, about an hour south of Green Bay, so our driving conditions will be similar to yours, NOPCBS, in mid-Michigan. Thanks.
  • if they don't want anything less than 30k in the BMW dealership.
  • nopcbsnopcbs Posts: 43
    No problem because the traction control will control both the throttle and the brakes (via ABS) to prevent slippage. You can turn the traction control off, of course, if you want to slip and slide to your heart's content. Fun on an empty parking lot.

    Snow (within reason - 12" of fresh snow and nothing is going to move) is no longer a serious issue for RWD cars equipped with traction control and decent tires.

    Hey, I remember growing up in Chicago in the 60's/70's when all cars (except Beetles and a few Fiats) were nose-heavy RWD and most went through the winter with half-worn bias ply tires and we still made it through winter...most of the time. It was "sporty" at times, though.

    Nowadays? Piece of cake.

    Don't worry about it. You will do fine.

    - Geo
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,035
    I think FWD is highly over rated on snow. I had a 1970 & 76 Datsun PU with weight in back plus an extended Dodge Van all RWD that out performed both my 1973 Subaru FWD and my 1978 Honda Accord FWD in deep snow. My 1967 VW Bug outperformed them all in snow by far.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,116
    Especially when you go uphill---FWD becomes problematic.

    A heavy RWD car with 4 snow tires and a good driver can be very effective in snow, as long as it isn't too deep of course.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • nopcbsnopcbs Posts: 43
    Let's not get carried away with the FWD bashing here, folks. Everything else being equal, the FWD car WILL do better on snow (by that I mean start moving and then keep going) than a RWD car. (OK, maybe not when you are going up steep hill, but your RWD car is not going to do well in that circumstance, either.)

    The weight of the engine over the drive wheels helps a lot vs. a RWD car. That's why Beetles did well (plus their light weight, overall) in snow. Plus Beetles had skinny tires to keep the pounds per square inch of contact relatively high.

    Where FWD cars have trouble is they tend to have low ground clearance, especially compared to trucks, SUV's, and even many RWD cars. The low ground clearance means they become plows when the snow gets just a little deep.

    The combination of RWD plus traction control plus snow tires just about equals the combination of FWD plus traction cntrol plus decent all-season tires, in my experience. Both are darned good...until the snow gets very deep.

    - Geo
  • fedlawmanfedlawman Posts: 3,118
    "The combination of RWD plus traction control plus snow tires just about equals the combination of FWD plus traction cntrol plus decent all-season tires, in my experience."

    I disagree. I think the RWD with dedicated snow tires will beat the FWD with all-season tires every time.

    I also frequently turn traction/stability control off.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    I've found that in extreme conditions, a FWD car shod with snow tires and driven backwards up a hill is almost unbeatable by anything shy of an AWD vehicle. :)

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,035
    The combination of RWD plus traction control plus snow tires just about equals the combination of FWD plus traction cntrol plus decent all-season tires, in my experience. Both are darned good...until the snow gets very deep.

    Most of my driving in snow included rather steep hills. None had traction control at that time. The 73 Subaru would start bouncing in about 3 inches of snow on the slightest hill. Then pop out of gear. Very frustrating car. The 78 Accord would drift around and very difficult to keep going straight. My partners Saab at the time was very good. So I just wrote it off as poor Japanese engineering. Not to mention the horrible dealers involved.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,116
    The reason there is so much variation in experience with RWD/FWD is because the factor of the driver is such a substantial part of the equation.

    I'd feel fully confident in a 335D in heavy snow conditions and wouldn't hesitate to take it anywhere. But I'd have 4 snows on it.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,035
    Experience does play a big role. I did a lot of off roading prior to moving to Alaska. I was very aware of how easy it is to get stuck even with a 4X4. We also ran 4 studded tires during the 1970s & 80s, all winter long. I did not own a 4WD in Alaska until 1988.

    I did not test drive the 335D when I was trying out the X5 diesel. Just not my cup of tea. I would say from what friends have told me RWD BMWs handle very well on ice which is the most dangerous.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,116
    I would think any engine that gives lots of torque at very low RPMs would be great for snow, as you could lug it around without having to shift too often or rev high to get off the line. Just ease out the clutch at idle and putt off into the snow!

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,916
    "Just ease out the clutch at idle and putt off into the snow! "

    This might not be true in the US market's BMW 335 D's case as it currently only comes in 6 speed automatic.

    However on those diesels with 6 speed manuals, that is truly one of the well kept secrets. The TREMENDOUS torque at low rpms, literally make driving a manual effortless and also since one can engage the clutch at almost stall rpms, this cuts down the wear considerably. (It helps of course if one knows this and applies the knowledge accordingly.)
  • Huh? Dropping the clutch at idle, and it won't stall? Don't you mean 1st gear? That is a great tip, but unfortunately BMW is not bring out the 335d with a manual to the US market. They had claimed that the manual transmission can't handle all that torque. I wonder how the manual transmission is handling all that torque over in Europe. Doesn't make sense.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    As far as I know, the 335d isn't available anywhere in the world with a manual transmission. Yes, no?

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,116
    Actually that's okay. I always felt the best combination for a diesel car was a turbo automatic.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,916
    1st gear yes. Well, obviously he misspoke, So I just connected the dots. :surprise:

    It would appear that BMW in effect "cheaped out". The torque (300 - 405
    # ft ) between the 335 I and the 335D is app 105 # ft MORE, add to that an additional safety factor, and you are probably talking a radical redesign, aka higher cost. Not even the 550I - 5 series V-8 has 405# ft (360 # ft only- only is way oxymoronic in this application)

    So for as many as they anticipated selling, a 6 speed manual option probably makes no economic sense.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,116
    It makes no sense to market this car as a manual transmission in the USA anyway IMO. I think BMW made the right move here.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • nopcbsnopcbs Posts: 43
    You're right, of course. The overwhelming majority of BMW's sold in the US are automatics. BMW was even reluctant to sell their current M cars with a manual option and had to be talked into it by US enthusiasts who wanted it...and some dealers as an image need.

    BMW used to be a very sporting brand in the US, but that was long ago and now they are one of the brands for the affluent who are just buying a sporty image, but don't really like to drive very much...or have a clue how to drive a manual.

    Not all, mind you, but (given the number who want an automatic when they can have a manual) certainly most. BMW knows their market. It's another reason we will not see the 1-Series hatch here...unless they need the EPA numbers. Image.
  • jlbljlbl Posts: 1,333
    As far as I know, the 335d isn't available anywhere in the world with a manual transmission. Yes, no?

    Yes, indeed. ;)

    Regards,
    Jose
  • jlbljlbl Posts: 1,333
    Last week I (again) drove uphill my 335d with Bridgestone Potenza RFT summer tires for a few miles on up to 5 inches of fresh snow.

    To do so, I switched off the traction control (but not the sliding one) as recommended in the BMW manual. To start moving from a full stop, it was enough to put the stick in D mode or M mode and release the brake pedal. Torque was tamed. Too much pressure on the accelerator then or afterwards and the rear end could start to sideslip, though it was easy to control the sliding. With snow tires I don't feel it would be difficult to drive safely a 335d on snow for more long distances — provided enough ground clearance.

    Here is some pics of the car (in a parking lot free of snow above of the snowed road)

    image

    image

    image

    Regards,
    Jose
  • nkeennkeen Posts: 316
    Great photos -- a haunted treescape. Where were they taken?
  • jlbljlbl Posts: 1,333
    Where were they taken?

    In the parking lot of the entrance to Pont d'Espagne. Pont d'Espagne is a mountain pass (by foot) between France and Spain. It belongs to the Central Pyrenees National Park which extends itself on both sides of the border. Closer villages to Pont d'Espagne are Cauterets in France and Panticosa in Spain.

    You may see more pics of the place in my CarSpace Albums:

    April Snow (2009)

    Central Pyrenees 2007

    Here is some example from there

    image

    image

    Regards,
    Jose
Sign In or Register to comment.