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Mitsubishi Outlander vs. Subaru Forester

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  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I always keep an old, thick blanket and use it as a liner/protector inside. Handy.

    I snapped that pic after I'd unwrapped and untied the plywood from the roof. I bought 9 sheets (plywood/OSD pre-primed) that day. In the pic I think there were only 4 left.

    They were very secure, without a doubt. Something my 1998 model had that I miss was the 4 sturdy handles in the roof rails themselves. They served as excellent tie-downs.

    The 2009 has a loop towards the back, but none at the front.

    As a trade-off they increased the roof rack capacity to an impressive 175 lbs. I believe the Outlander can carry 110 lbs, still decent.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    I replied. We'll see if the poster is still having the problem.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Thanks.

    I hear the manual is thick as a book, eh? And there's 2 of them?

    Have you read it cover-to-cover yet? The holiday break is your chance.

    I read the manual on my 1998 Forester and took notes as I went along. I learned 7 things I didn't know. And I'd owned the car for years. :D

    Cheers. :shades:
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    Three, technically .. maintenance, Mitsubishi multicommunication system (MMCS), and the regular owners manual. For Maintenance there's nothing until the first oil change @ 7500 miles. I've read through the MMCS but will need to read it at least one more time. There are so many different things in it. The regular manual I've read the majority of. It can be skimmed and parts skipped since it covers like 4 different dash designs (regular, GT (maybe XLS), and again in km/Celcius).
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    3? I'm not even sure if that's a good thing, or a bad thing. :D

    My Sienna came with a book-sized manual and a DVD, but the video is mostly to show you how to flip and fold all the seats. 7 of the 8 seats fold, all in different ways!
  • >> I guess you could load it on the roof of a any compact crossover, but as mentioned earlier the GT doesn't have roof rails, so you'll need to add accessories to do that. IMHO that makes it far from the ideal vehicle to haul lumber. An XLS V6 would be better suited.

    Outlander front seat folds flat, so if you take advantage of that you probably get largest and longest cargo space in class.

    And with the clever split clam-shall tailgate design you can leave opened just the lower part of tailgate, so that lumber could extent even longer: no roof rails needed.

    Other advantages of internal cargo placement: the weight limit is 10 times higher, better aerodynamics / gas mileage / noise level, weather protection, safety, easier / faster to load / mount.

    image

    This design also simplifies transportation of bicycle.

    I believe no other vehicle in class could offer this level of cargo flexibility. Passenger flexibility is amazing too: it is probably the smallest vehicle with 3rd row seat; the full length bed option was already mentioned.
  • >> On hauling lumber: Not as nice as a pickup or enclosed van but the fold down tailgate extends the deck area on the Outlander. One reason I passed on the RAV4.

    Yea, RAV can't do that.
  • >> What was on the cover? What month, I mean? I honestly didn't see that chart. I looked again at the January 2010 issue and saw something about Owner Satisfaction (Escape and Mariner Hybrids win the category). Maybe you saw a special edition/buyer's guide?

    I guess, it could be a special edition, since it was thin. The cover had title something like ‘Best and Worst New Cars 2010’.


    >> I do have that, the "Buying Guide 2010" book and on page 172 they rate the 07 Outlander "Much Better than Average" but the 08 is merely "Average".

    “merely Average"? Hmm. Outlander was Consumer Reports top 2-5 most reliable in class at least 4 last years:
    2006, 2007, 2008, 2008J, 2009
  • I've been following this forum for a long time, as I've always liked the Outlander. We almost bought one 4 years ago. So, I decided to visit the Mitsu store and look at the 2010. Both my wife and I like the interior, and other aspects of the Outlander, but absolutely abhor the new grille/front end. Ugly doesn't even describe it. I know beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but I just can't make the giant leap on this one. IMO, Mitsu took a step backward with the new grille/front end design.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    As you said, beauty is in the eye.. I was somewhat iffy on the new grill when seen in photos and my wife didn't like it. But in person we both like it. I think it works well to add an aggressive look to the previously somewhat bland front end. Also, the front will look different based on trim. There's one that's just black, another that has chrome trim, and IIRC a third design (maybe the color-keyed bumper bar as pictured on the right). IMO the black with chrome trim looks best.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,699
    I'm not going to get into this debate, as to which is better. I'm sure each has its strengths and weaknesses. I will say however, no Mitsubishi will be on my short list to buy until that company can prove that they can survive here in the USA. I'm not concerned what they do globally, but I'm very concerned what they do here—as that's where I am.

    Just this past year two local Mitsubishi dealers closed their doors. So, too few dealers in my area, and a questionable future in this country do not make for a good situation. No, I'll pass thank you.

    Bob
  • p0926p0926 Posts: 4,423
    That's impressive for a small CUV but I sure wouldn't want to drive any distance at all with a load like that hanging out the back. You may not have to worry about anything flying off the roofrack during an emergency stop but having the rear end totally exposed while hauling a load of lumber brings its own set of potential bad ending scenarios.

    -Frank
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    They've been in the US since 1981. How many more years will it take for you to be convinced?
  • p0926p0926 Posts: 4,423
    Longevity means nothing. Oldsmobile was probably a 100 years old but when their market share kept dropping, GM shuttered their doors. If Mitsu can't turn their sales around, they're sure to join an ever growing list of companies that no longer exist (at least in the US).

    -Frank
  • comem47comem47 Posts: 395
    That's impressive for a small CUV but I sure wouldn't want to drive any distance at all with a load like that hanging out the back. You may not have to worry about anything flying off the roofrack during an emergency stop but having the rear end totally exposed while hauling a load of lumber brings its own set of potential bad ending scenarios

    ??? (explain). There is something like 2 foot beyond the tailgate compared to 6 feet within and the load is securely strapped and weight biased inside. The lights are all visible if you care to run flashers. That load was going nowhere (If on the roof I could see it land on the hood of the car in an emergency stop it the straps broke). Maybe the picture doesn't clearly show the multiple straps around and across.

    Now here is something I wouldn't attempt!!! :sick:

    image
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,699
    Mitsubishi sales are off a staggering 46% over the year, with no signs of improvement. Their bread-and-butter Galant sales are off 60.6%, and the better-known sporty Eclipse coupe is down 72%.

    http://www.autoobserver.com/2009/12/automakers-see-glass-half-full-after-flat-no- - - vember-sales.html

    Yeah, I know they've got a neat electric car coming, but it may be too-little-to-late.

    As Frank said, longevity means nothing. It's the current sales slide that concerns me.

    Bob
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    “merely Average"? Hmm. Outlander was Consumer Reports top 2-5 most reliable in class at least 4 last years:

    Yes, but remember it's not in the top 5 any more, and my Forester (non-turbo) is.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I was wondering when the Lumber Jetta would make it in to this discussion. :D

    As to long cargo, you can slide the front passenger seat forward on a Forester, recline the front seat, remove the front head rest. Voila. Put long items in the footwell. Just put a blanket over the seats for protection.

    Pretty simple solution.

    I'd still rather use the roof. 175 lbs is a lot. Plus no scratches on the interior.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Just googled it and Bob Vila's site says a 1/4" sheet of plywood weighs about 25 lbs. So that's 7 sheets on the roof of any Forester.

    The Outlander with roof rails can handle 4 on the roof.

    Both models can also handle plywood inside with the hatch open.

    The Forester (surprise) actually has more width between the wheel wells. dodo2 (an Outlander owner, FWIW) measured 37" for the Outlander, vs. 42.1" for the Forester (cars101.com).

    Both can easily accomodate 48" wide plywood at an angle. The Forester is just 6" shy of handling it flat.

    Still, I'd be afraid to scratch the interior.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,699
    Yeah, but for most construction applications, 1/4" plywood won't do. Figure on 1/2" to do the job. So you're looking at 50 pounds per sheet.

    Bob
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    I just loaded luggage + Xmas presents for over 20 people in the Outlander. Tons of room to spare. :blush:
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    OK, that's what I used for the ceiling of my outdoor front patio, 1/4" plywood/OSB. At 9 sheets I was a bit over the limit, I suppose.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    It's gonna be a great Xmas, then. :shades:
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    Oldsmobiles were crappy cars. They weren't competitive at all with the possible exception of the Aurora. Jeez, would you have bought an Achieva? Mitsu, OTOH, is competitive with the Galant being the sole exception. Yes, sales aren't good and their % drop is higher than the average loss that most automakers have seen this year, but that may well be due to the tightened credit markets as Mitsu in the past did a lot (too many) of questionable credit loans. Also, Mitsu corporate needs to free up some advertising dollars. I don't see it having anything to do with the quality of the vehicles.

    So far it seems they can't build Outlander GTs fast enough. When I bought mine the other one they had gotten in sold at the same time. People on the Mitsu Facebook site are bemoaning the lack of GTs at their local dealers. No one is complaining about closing dealerships, poor quality vehicles, and so on.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    For the family, yes. They don't get the bill for it all. :cry:
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    OK, so I took a tape measure outside, and got to work.

    3 challenges were issued. The bed challenge. The long lumber challenge. And the 48" wide plywood challenge.

    Bed: works as I thought. Slide the front seat forward. Remove head rests. Lay it back, it's even with the rear seat. Recline the rear seat. Bed. PASS

    Long cargo: seats in the same position. Tape measure from the bottom of the foot well to the rear hatch (closed). Total length was well over 10 feet. With the hatch open, tied down properly, you could easily get a 16 foot long deck plank. They don't make them any longer than that. PASS

    Wide cargo: can it clear a 48" sheet? Yes, with a couple of inches to spare, actually. PASS

    This test takes *nothing* away from the Outlander's versatility, but it does show that just because the Forester looks small on the outside, doesn't mean it's not big on the inside.

    ***

    Disclaimer: I'd still use the roof rack. because I'd want to lie heavy cargo like that laying flat. Or I'd use my minivan.

    Edited for spelling.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,247
    The Galant isn't competitive and deserves poor sales until they re-do it. As the owner of a '99 Galant and a Mitsu fan in general it pains me to say it but ever since the '04 redesign it's been an also-ran sedan.

    The Lancer is their bread & butter sedan and it's sales decline isn't bad considering the economy.

    The Outlander was rolling out a new model year. Many people, like me, probably held off for a '10 instead of an '09 since the '10 has numerous improvements. I was ready to buy in July but waited 'til December.

    The Eclipse I couldn't say. Sport coupes are very cyclical in their sales and right now the Altima coupe is probably the hot seller. That's a guess, though, as I don't follow that market much (I can't fit in those things comfortably).
  • comem47comem47 Posts: 395
    This test takes *nothing* away from the Outlander's versatility, but it does show that just because the Forester looks small on the outside, doesn't mean it's not big on the inside.

    Yes, The '08 on up Forester is a great improvement. I can't take anything away from Subies as a great all season vehicle, except the earlier cars were a bit too small for my needs (and more expensive to boot). Kinda like Goldilocks and the 3 bears
    Some SUVs were too big(gas$$ too) and some too small but this CUV is just right for me. YMMV
  • comem47comem47 Posts: 395
    I was wondering when the Lumber Jetta would make it in to this discussion.
    ......

    I'd still rather use the roof. 175 lbs is a lot. Plus no scratches on the interior.


    Well to each their own but I'd rather not risk slipping and denting or scratching the roof. A blanket on the inside will do nicely for me (saw a "Renovation Realities" episode where some bozos massively dented the roof of their friends borrowed pickup because they didn't secure things)

    As for the Jetta: in case anyone was wondering it is real, not photo-shopped.
    How the Home Depot employees ever allowed it to be loaded (disclaimer or no) is criminal

    http://www.snopes.com/photos/automobiles/lumber.asp
  • jvainejvaine Posts: 34
    I bought an 07 outlander Dec 06 they have since closed the local dealership.I now have to drive about 80 miles round trip for service.( NOT A HAPPY CAMPER)
This discussion has been closed.