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Mitsubishi Outlander vs. Subaru Forester

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Comments

  • Oh, it's not about having a sports car or anything related to a sports car. It's about the AWD systems at the core of the matter; Utility is the first priority, convenience and amenities are just icing.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    edited February 2010
    Remember you said you "can't see anyone" doing such things which brought on this entire conversation. :)

    It was a general statement, meaning not just one person, but referring to the masses. Obviously one person did it, whoever that person is, maybe even two people, maybe three. These cars in my mind are not direct competitors because they both have AWD systems any more than a Hummer and a Harley both have tires.

    edit: I generally buy for form and function but both have to be there based on my needs and wants at the time. But luxury is not a Foresters strong point and if I were a luxury shopper the Forester wouldn't even be considered. Other luxury cars can do what the Forester can.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,657
    edited February 2010
    They're probably trading for another car in the same "status" range; Lexus, Infiniti, Benz, BMW, Audi, etc.

    They may go down-market, but not likely; if so, most likely to Honda, I would think. My guess is a former MDX buyer would opt for a Honda Pilot before a Forester.

    Bob
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited February 2010
    Want to hear something real wild?

    In 2002 my wife had to choose between a BMW sedan and a 2 bedroom condo at the beach (a downpayment on it, anyway).

    The condo had a lot more leg and head room, plus 2 entertainment screens.

    The Bimmer had more horsepower (~190 IIRC vs. zero) but that wasn't enough to sway her from the much larger windows and running water in the condo. ;)
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    edited February 2010
    But the condo couldn't transport you and your wife in style down the interstate at 90 mph. :) 90mph vs 0. :shades
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Yeah but it's a little more comfy to sleep in. :P

    Plus, resale value has gone in the right direction (it's worth more than we paid, even after recent price drops).
  • imaginaryimaginary Posts: 58
    edited February 2010
    I know they're not direct competitors; I just wanted to compare them anyways because it'd be a nice change to only have to eat an oran-ple instead of having to eat both an orange and an apple to accomplish the same things. :P

    I wasn't looking for luxury at all when I stumbled upon the MDX. I'm still not looking for luxury. I am, however, looking for convenience and comfort from the Subaru Forester like second row heated seats, a power rear door, 8-10-way power passenger seat, a better navigation system, and some other stuff I can't remember off the top of my head. Since the Subaru Forester couldn't offer that, I got curious if other vehicles offered those amenities but didn't sacrifice utility at the same time. I know there are some after market solutions to my desires. However it'd be nice for a change when I don't have to put together a big puzzle using different and almost completely unrelated puzzle pieces. :sick:

    Regardless, I still love the Subaru Forester. Just, if only... :blush:
  • You couldn't fold down the seats and maybe have some cushioning material laid out beneath two sleeping bags? That sounds kind of comfortable to me. Not exactly a king sized bed but it's mobile like a 20" laptop.
  • kdshapirokdshapiro Posts: 5,751
    edited February 2010
    Now I understand thanks for clarifying. I've kinda grown tired of my Subaru. Although it's been reliable, meaning nothing more than routine maintenance:

    - the moonroof has developed a whistling noise, but no leaks.
    - I've grown tired of the noisy interior.
    - I want radio controls on the steering wheel.
    - There is a slight coolant leak. No dripping on the floor but the coolant is disappearing somewhere.
    - I have the infamous engine click of death in the winter.
    - I want the fifth/sixth gear in the transmission.
    - One of the bearings or the belt is starting to get a little noisy.
    - Every once in a while the thing decides to burn some oil. So for about 30 seconds or so I see smoke out of the tailpipe on an occasional basis.

    There are things I like about the car, but the annoying things are really grating on me. I've already decided to run the car into the ground before getting a new one.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    What does an MDX cost nowadays? After discounts, I mean.

    I think Acura has interiors nailed down pat. I'm not a fan of the big chrome schnooze, but I've seen some aftermarket body color ones that look better. It also is more tame if you get a silver car because it blends in.

    I'm not a fan of OEM Navi - any of them. Spend $2 grand and you can't do what a $250 Garmin can do (how 'bout a custom POI database to alert you about speed cams?). The updates are seldom and cost what an entire portable unit costs.

    I read that Nissan will market a built-in with a backup cam for $400 - now you're talking. I'd still be concern about the frequency of map updates, though.
  • I've driven a variety of Toyota vehicles but only just that. I'm ready for AWD. I'm tired of driving 4x4 and FWD vehicles up here in Colorado. Either I have to deal with the gear binding or trying to get a running start. I've been looking at the Subaru Forester since 1998. I know the common problems that are in the Subaru Forester. The only thing that might start to get annoying over the years are the rattles. Most of the other stuff I've already dealt with in the Toyota vehicles I've driven.
  • imaginaryimaginary Posts: 58
    edited February 2010
    Not sure what the price tag is after discounts. I haven't bothered to look around seriously for an MDX.

    It's nice having everything there so it's under warranty by Subaru compared to an aftermarket product. Besides having to choose which aftermarket product is the correct one, I just like everything to be from the car manufacturer when I buy it. Just that kind of flow and consistency. Maybe a bit of OCD there but oh well :).

    Oh, I'd rather have an in-dash navigation GPS than a hand-held just because it's there in the car hooked up to everything. Plus the screen size is bigger. :blush: That's a big plus.

    I haven't heard about that concerning Nissan. I was never really interested in the style of their vehicles or the kind of vehicles they have. The Leaf looks interesting but I'd rather opt for the Honda FCX Clarity if I ever thought about alternative fuel.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    Wow, I walk away for a day and the post count explodes. I'm glad for the discussion.

    I think it's the rare bird who actually cross-shops AWD systems. For most people not in extreme snow climates these differences in AWD are all theoretical. Even the worst of AWD systems can get a driver from point a to b in a decent amount of snow.

    I agree 100%. Let's be honest. There are those who buy AWD systems for off-roading. They will look at the systems in detail and probably not opt for any of these vehicles as they'll opt for a body-on-frame truck over a car-based CUV/SUV.

    Then there are those who want AWD for performance/handling. That's the Audi Quatro crowd as well as the WRX/Evo types. Engine performance matters more than the transmission's mechanical details. I'd probably toss the Infiniti EX in this group as well.

    After those groups are "the rest of us." We're the everyday buyers who live on the snow belt, drive on the beach, live in rural areas with mud/gravel roads, or do mild off-roading (like said mud/gravel). Ground clearance matters. Getting traction matters. Split differentials don't. We buy the Explorers, Foresters, MDX/RDXs, RX, Outlanders, and so on. Both luxury and non.

    For the rest of us, when there's so much snow on the ground that you're debating the merits of AWD systems, you probably should not be out driving. Even if your AWD system is up to snuff, the '82 Firebird in front of you ain't goin' nowhere fast and you're stuck behind 'em. And also, the AWD systems may help you get going and VSC will help keep you going in the direction you want, nothing will help you stop on icy roads except the 12 car pile-up in front of you.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    Crazy comparisons happen all the time.

    Indeed. Back in '99 when I bought my Galant I had set a price point of $30K and said I wanted the best value (my interpretation) for the money up to that price. Through research various cars were evaluated & eliminated. The final contenders were the Galant and, surprise, the Acura TL. I liked the TL but in an honest evaluation the Galant felt like it had a bigger cabin. Both had leather, a V6 that required premium gas, good stereos, and many other similarities. The final analysis said the TL had 30 HP more than the Galant and had traction control. The Galant, after upgrading to a 10 yr warranty was $8K cheaper.

    I've no doubt I would have enjoyed the TL but the Galant was enjoyable as well and was very reliable over the 10 years/152K miles I had it. For $8K less I did not miss the experience of owning a semi-premium brand.
  • imaginaryimaginary Posts: 58
    edited February 2010
    "For the rest of us, when there's so much snow on the ground that you're debating the merits of AWD systems, you probably should not be out driving. Even if your AWD system is up to snuff, the '82 Firebird in front of you ain't goin' nowhere fast and you're stuck behind 'em. And also, the AWD systems may help you get going and VSC will help keep you going in the direction you want, nothing will help you stop on icy roads except the 12 car pile-up in front of you."

    As state patrol officers across the nation keep saying over and over after every, single, pile-up: "It's only a matter of time before these people driving 70, even 80 mph lose control and get into an accident". There's also another solution to that too. It's taking a road you know is almost completely out of your way but has little to no traffic. If the "rest of us" are willing to take the chance of going on the highway when you know full well there are people in your state who have no idea how to drive in the snow, you should know you're going to be running into that "12 car pile-up" pretty soon. Your chances of running into such a pile up are as simple as remembering there are more ways than one to get to the cities in your state.

    Driving like a grandma at a safe speed limit beats getting into a 12-30 car pile up. Oh and leaving ample space between you and the car in front of you. Personally, I'd rather run into a ditch than end up sandwiched into a pile up BUT that's just me. :) I at least know I "debated" my AWD system to prepare for such occurrences. We're the the kind of people who actually plan ahead and, sometimes, over plan for every single detail. :D
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    edited February 2010
    or trying to get a running start

    That's what it's like with my FWD Sienna. Can't make it up my stinkin' driveway when there's snow, not to mention I gotta turn the VSC off.

    GPS ... Plus the screen size is bigger.

    Hmm, consider an Outback, then. A 3.6R Ltd with Navi is still low 30s, and it has a giant 8" screen. The backup cam has trajectory lines, and it's a bit nicer inside than the Forester. Early reliability scores from TrueDelta have been excellent (sadly the Equinox/Terrain are showing electrical gremlins).
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Good call, too. Didn't those '99 TLs have the glass transmissions?
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    The trajectory lines are great. It makes backing into parking spaces in the Outlander a breeze. The Outie also has a red line going across that represents about 18" from the bumper, which allows room for a reasonable gap and coincidentally is enough to open the hatch. There are also hash marks at 1, 2, and 3 meters.

    After one snowfall the image was blurry as there was a small icicle hanging in front of it. :)
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,217
    Some TLs did have the bad trannies but I though that was the 02-03 years. Could have easily included the 99s and up, though. What sucked was Acura replaced the bad transmissions with more of the same, but IIRC they did extend the warranty on them.

    The Galant was rock-solid dependable. The only time I couldn't drive it was when the OEM battery died suddenly after about 3 or 4 years. Otherwise I was never stranded and had just $500 in repairs (does not include maintenance/wear items) over almost 11 years. Having it be such a good car is what caused me to heavily favor the Outlander.
  • "The Galant was rock-solid dependable. The only time I couldn't drive it was when the OEM battery died suddenly after about 3 or 4 years. Otherwise I was never stranded and had just $500 in repairs (does not include maintenance/wear items) over almost 11 years. Having it be such a good car is what caused me to heavily favor the Outlander."

    Same with our Mirage, dead battery every 4-5 years was the only problem, otherwise trouble-free, which made considering another Mitsu very logical. Just spent some quality time in a 2010 Benz GLK. Decent seats, nice leather, but I think the Outlander seats might be better. The GLK was a bit more docile over bumps, but the Outlander seemed spunkier. Plus the Outie has adjustable rear seats and considerably more cargo space.
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