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Ford Fiesta

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Comments

  • phill1phill1 Posts: 315
    Besides having KPH instead of MPH and Daytime Running Lights, the Canadian Fiesta has several different standard features. ALL SE model Fiesta`s get as standard, am/fm single CD radio with (4) speakers, BUT also standard SIRUS Satellite radio with free 6 months subscription at no additional cost. Also included is the removeable folding package tray for trunk stowage. NO premium upgrade charge of $180 for the Red Candy metallic paint either. Power Moon Roof is $1295 instead of only $695 on US version, ouch! The car is priced model for model and option for option several thousand dollars more in Canadian dollars and with the exchange rate not being all that much different, its still quite a bit more. Can`t figure why they would switch low end radios on assembly line with identical features except for the Sirius. The cost differences in the two radios must me minimal and leave the buyer to decide if they want to subscribe with or without the introductory 6 months of free service. As far as the DRL, now thats another matter. Only Ford and Chrysler refuse to join with the rest of the world and refuse to equip US version vehicle with this devise unlike nearly all other foreign and domestic manufacturers. Until DRL`s are mandated by the NHTSA for all US cars, they refuse to add the module to the wiring harness while the same car goes down the same line and is installed with DRL`s heading for Canada, go figure?
  • creakid1creakid1 Posts: 2,032
    edited March 2010
    ...I replaced my old 1998 Escort wagon with a new 2001 Focus wagon.

    They're both sweet cars, & not too slow w/ manual. The Protege-based Escort has uncontrollable oversteer available, while the Focus, w/ the technologically advanced Control Blades, oversteers controllably.

    They both got an excellent steering that's quick w/ real road feel & a comfortable resilient ride, all wrapped in a roomy but highly-maneuverable compact-exterior package. What more can you ask?

    But everytime when I recommended one these 2 "best small wagons in the world" (especially the Focus wagon) to those who are in real need of a roomy small wagon, they always came up w/ excuses like they need more pwr, larger back seat, or AWD. Yeah, right. You know what? I don't believe'em! They've been living w/ 2WD cars w/ 4-cyl & were OK w/ them.

    So my brother ended up getting the E46 325xi wagon, which gave the passengers a hard time sitting next to the center-mounted child-safety seat. Not to mention their 130lb Swiss-mt rescue-dog pet could barely squeeze into the cargo area & kept dripping saliva onto the cow-hide-wrapped 2nd-roll seat...

    & I can only laugh when watching my slow-driving friend & relative, who just became Porsche owners for the first time lately, living miserably driving these brand-new cars. & I'm not talking about the $.

    FYI, Ford's Duratec engine block is designed by Porsche, so my Focus 2.3 ST is like a Porsche w/ a smoother ride :P
  • puffin1puffin1 Posts: 276
    What about the Animals? "We Got to get Out of This Place no Matter what we do"
    I Corps Con Tien Grid 6341 Second Marines on the DMZ Puffin 0302 and I avoid my Bluetooth and would be paranoid using On Star. Yes, I still watch my back.
  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,708
    Perhaps it's because the thing drives like a Kia with an automatic? :P

    Just drive stick if you want a small fast hatchback.
  • iamziamz Posts: 542
    Normally that is true. The Fiesta might be one of the exceptions. Each clutch in a dual clutch takes turns shifting through the gears, meaning there is no lag between shifts. In all likelyhood, it will shift faster than 99.9% of all drivers with a manual. If they are tuned for efficiency, keeping the gears matched to the engines powerband, the 6-speed dual clutch may be faster.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,623
    Dual clutch gearboxes can shift in milliseconds, orders of magnitude faster than even the fastest stick shift.

    There is no reason to get a traditional manual trans now other than simple driving enjoyment (which is a great reason). Manuals are no longer cheaper, faster or get better mileage.
  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,708
    We'll see. I suspect that what we actually get here in the U.S. will be a miserable kludged thing like Ford is famous for. Toyota tried this a few years ago in the MR2 and the Smart Car is downright crippled by a half-baked version of it. At best this will work like promised but break down by 50K miles unles you drive my my grandmother.

    This isn't BMW. It's Ford. And the smart money is to avoid any automatic transmission they make if there's a manual available.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,623
    But that's just it - this is NOT - I repeat NOT - an automatic with manual shift capability. Totally different technology. This is really 2 manual transmissions with an electronic clutch that share an input and output shaft. While one is engaged, the other one has preselected the next gear and you simply move the input shaft from one to the other to shift. No torque converter.
  • lilengineerboylilengineerboy Posts: 4,116
    But that's just it - this is NOT - I repeat NOT - an automatic with manual shift capability. Totally different technology. This is really 2 manual transmissions with an electronic clutch that share an input and output shaft. While one is engaged, the other one has preselected the next gear and you simply move the input shaft from one to the other to shift. No torque converter.

    Its tuned for economy, the shifter just says PRNDL and there is no manual mode. Its a dry clutch sequential automated gearbox. Its efficient, not fun.
  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,708
    edited March 2010
    Exactly. Computer controlled, and simply put, not a PDK or similar high-tech dual gearbox(and even Porsche can't seem to make a reliable one - Ford has no hope at all, IMO). They simply put won't put a $5000 gearbox in a $13000 car. It'll be half-baked and break all the time and NOT be quick to drive as a result of having to stress economy and clutch life over performance.

    A great example was the SMT in the MR2. It had a non-defeatable half second delay between shifts in order to maximize clutch life. It sucked as a result.

    Given that it's Ford, I'll believe it when I drive it.
  • iamziamz Posts: 542
    I guess we'll know when they start to arrive. But, it's not a Ford transmission. It's a mostly German designed transmission. A partnership between Getrag and Ford.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,623
    I didn't say it was fun or had manual control. I was responding to the comment that it would be slow to shift like other Ford trannies which is apples and oranges.
  • lilengineerboylilengineerboy Posts: 4,116
    I didn't say it was fun or had manual control. I was responding to the comment that it would be slow to shift like other Ford trannies which is apples and oranges.

    I didn't meant to make it sound like a direct response to your statement. Its just doesn't seem like the VW DSG everyone is expecting.
  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,708
    I had a Getrag gearbox in an old Volvo 240 years ago and trust me - they suffer from the same problem that all German automotive parts do. Because of legal and financial rules and incentives, they source everything through German companies where possible and you end up with a beautiful car that frankly, even the Koreans can beat in terms of price and durability.

    Frankly "German Automatic" makes me cringe even more than if it was "Ford Automatic". Together, it'll take a small miracle to not be as bad as Chrysler's.
  • iamziamz Posts: 542
    Plekto,

    Have you ordered a Fiesta yet?
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,623
    Automatics have torque converters and planetary gearsets. Ford's powershift has neither. It has more in common with a manual than an automatic.
  • iamziamz Posts: 542
    Here's a link with some good images. You can see it's nothing like a conventional automatic.

    http://green.autoblog.com/gallery/ford-powershift-gearbox#4
  • creakid1creakid1 Posts: 2,032
    edited March 2010
    If you are thinking about German's expensive SMG (sequential manual gearbox) from earlier BMW (and similar unit on Ferrari/Lamborghini), then, yes, it's a manual transmission with the clutch pushes in a rough manner on every shift by a high-pressure hydraulic robot, & will likely to break earlier than an conventional manual transmssion.

    Fiesta's VW/Audi-style DSG's clutch is always engaged except during the first few mph from 0 mph, then each gear change is done DIRECTLY by sliding into the next pre-aligned gear in a perfectly seamless manner. Even during downshifts, the engine throttle is adjusted accordingly to rev match. With smooth operation like that, the gears (& clutch?) will wear out even slower than in an conventional manual transmission.

    Unlike VW/Audi/Porsche, Ford skips the manual-mode on this transmission b/c Ford customers are too cheap to afford it.

    But I still prefer the conventional manual transmission partly b/c I can shift to neutral whenever I want.
  • iamziamz Posts: 542
    Thanks creakid1,

    I was going to put in a link that descibed how this transmission works for anyone confused about how it differs from a traditional auto-tran but your little summary pretty much gets to the point. The simplicity of the Powersift should prove it to be very reliable.

    Here's a link anyway;

    http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_7-10147042-48.html
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