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Vintage Car Identification Help!

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Comments

  • erjorg1erjorg1 Posts: 2
    Hi - I'm interested in identifying the make and model of this car owned by my grandparents. Also, from the license plate, is there any way to determine where it was registered? Thanks in advance.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/52871830@N06/4875763377/

    Eric
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,598
    Yeah, it looks like there's a 40s GM product in the garage in the background, too.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,598
    I think that's a 1935 Plymouth...can't tell anything on the plate
  • erjorg1erjorg1 Posts: 2
    Thank you -
    Eric
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,630
    35 Plymouth:

    image

    MODERATOR

  • Can Anyone help me identify this old Ford - and also tell me if there is any value in it?

    file:///C:/Users/new%20user/Desktop/Site%20visit%20~%2011-09-09%20(46).JPG

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks
    Florain
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,541
    Florian-it looks like that file is on your computer. If you would upload it to your carspace account (or flickr or the like) then post the link, we can take a look.
  • Hi mi name is Martin and I wonna ask you to id some of cars used by my uncle before II war in Poland. Think it`s all german construction but need the names of all cars.

    image
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    This one looks like after war maybe russian construction ?

    image

    Thanks for help...
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,630
    Great photos by the way.

    MODERATOR

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,598
    edited September 2010
    Great pics.

    First car reminds me of an early 20s Lancia with its headlight arrangement and fenders...but I know little about those cars and am likely not correct.

    Second car - I am 110% certain it is a Ford Model T ca. 1923. By this time Ford had many foreign factories, so it could be a European built car.

    Third car (truck) - no idea,

    4th and 6th cars are the same vehicle. I like the 6th pic as I have a jacket identical to the guy at left. Regarding what the car is, it is difficult as so many European cars looked similar. It's from around 1930 give or take 2 years. The bodywork looks more French than German to me, but there were few differences at the time.

    5th car is an Opel Olympia 1935-37.

    The truck at the end appears to be a German Büssing-NAG dating from just before the war to just after it.

    It might be tough to get more details here, as I think only a few members have any interest in ancient Euro metal. This site has a global contributor base, and can probably determine the mystery cars easily
  • rakewell1rakewell1 Posts: 1
    edited September 2010
    I'm curious about the identification of this rusted front end of a car, a photo of which I saw in a blog I read, here:

    http://www.somebeaut.com/2010/09/21/death-of-a-roadster/

    We don't have many clues. The most distinctive feature may be the slightly trapezoidal grill opening, larger at the top than the bottom. I looked up photos of all of the makes of car I could think of that had headlights of this general style, but never found one that matched this unusual grill opening shape. The small accessory lights underneath the headlamps, as well as the bumper mounts, might be additional clues.

    Nominations?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,630
    Looks like a Berkeley actually but not quite....

    MODERATOR

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,598
    edited September 2010
    I can't determine the roadster...seems kind of Lancia-ish somehow, but I am pretty sure the second car shown there is a Ford Maverick or Mercury Comet
  • the back country of NM is swimming in roadside relics. here are three that I just can't place:

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  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,155
    Not sure what the first one is. The middle one looks like a Willys Americar and the last appears to be the remains of a late 1930s Ford truck.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,598
    edited September 2010
    I'd say the first is a ~46 Hudson, the second looks like a 41 Ford coupe with a custom front end, and the third could be a lot of things but likely an early-mid 30s Ford.
  • jornadojornado Posts: 3
    edited September 2010
    I would say the 46 Hudson ID is positive: chrome trim and suicide doors:

    image

    image

    middle car has been hot rodded - steering and road wheels show that. that and the lack of a grill make identification interesting

    split windshield and lack of a hump on the front fender makes that coupe not a Willys Americar
  • lyda2lyda2 Posts: 5
    I would appreciate help identifying the vehicles pictured in the attached link. Both belonged to my grandparents in Kansas in the early 1900's. I believe the larger car dates to at least around 1925; I'm not sure about what looks like it might be an early truck. Thank you.

    http://nrkraemer.jalbum.net/Family-Cars
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,630
    Well you have to remember that back then there were many types of assembled cars and regional automobiles, so it might be tough to pinpoint every generic-looking automobile---in the 1915-25 era, there might have been 1500 separate makes of car in production!

    Given all that, the 1925-era car resembles an Essex, and the little car might be a Detroit Electric, circa World War I

    MODERATOR

  • texasestexases Posts: 5,541
    If you have the photograph, can you use a magnifying glass and see if you can make out the symbol on the wheel hub. It kind of looks like an 'S', but I really can't tell. As Mr. S said, hundreds of makes looked very similar during this time. A wheel hub or radiator badge are the surest clues.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,630
    edited October 2010
    Hmmm....could be a STAR....also close resemblance there. Not a Simplex, probably not a Saxon or a Stearns-Knight. Without a frontal shot, it gets very tough, even for the super-experts. Since many of these cars were "assembled" (made from parts bought from component manufacturers, like Saginaw transmissions and Continental engines and Moline radiators, etc), that left very few areas of the car with which to individualize the automobile----the body, which in a two-dimension side photo in black and white often looks quite anonymous in the 20s, and the radiator shell, which on the other hand can be quite unique, especially if we can see the grille badge or scripting. This is often the only real place to put a "label" on these generic assembled cars.

    There were some "S" cars made exclusively in Kansas, like the Sellers and the Stafford, but they did not survive into the 1920s.

    MODERATOR

  • lyda2lyda2 Posts: 5
    I've added a couple of photos of the larger car, one of which pretty clearly shows the front and the hood ornament. Could this be a Ford Model A? Thank you for the replies and suggestions.

    http://nrkraemer.jalbum.net/Family-Cars/
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,598
    edited October 2010
    Larger car - tough call but probably from 1923-25. Second car - Model T coupe from around 1920 with later wheels, Third car - larger car from first pic with Model T roadster in background, probably 1924-25, Fourth car - appears to be the same large car in the first pics, but maybe repainted or dusty. The large car has a very distinctive radiator shell, similar to Buick (but it isn't). It's not a Ford A, it predates that by several years. The hood ornament is a period typical "dog bone" style seen on many cars of the 20s, could be purchased aftermarket too. It appears to be a car higher on the rung than a Model T, a good middle class mid 20s box.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,629
    the picture with the guy sitting inside the front bumper has his profile perfectly reflected on the radiator.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,630
    edited October 2010
    Certainly not a Model A or anything in that class---it's a big car but not a particularly prestigious looking one----large and utilitarian. Yes, the "hood ornament" is generic---an aftermarket device called a "moto-meter". That's a thermometer in the glass circle, and you could see it from the driver's seat. This era car is tough to ID.

    MODERATOR

  • lyda2lyda2 Posts: 5
    I thought it might have been a Model A because I saw Model A photos on-line with similar bumpers and cross-pieces between the headlights (I don't know what those are called), and I remember my father telling me he had a Model A when he was young. But perhaps those bumpers were also common to many different varieties of car back then? Anyway, thank you for your replies - I appreciate your help and the information you've provided!
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,630
    The Model A is pretty easy to spot, yes. There are people a lot better at spotting these old timers than I am. Given the endless variety back then, some cars are quite a challenge and one would have to be quite the expert. There were hundreds and hundreds of different makes in that era of automotive history, and many did not exist but a few years.

    MODERATOR

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,598
    A Model A radiator shell is very easy to spot, the top horizontal component dips down in the middle like the top of a heart shape. Model As were smaller than that car.

    The radiator shell on that larger car is unusual, like a cross between a Buick and a Packard. Someone out there will know what it is, but I can't pinpoint it...those cars are way before my time.

    You can probably get some detailed info here, many posters there have knowledge about long-defunct cars

    The people here can probably identify it too
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,541
    The key to identifying a Model A is the radiator cap right in fron of the windshield:
    image
  • lyda2lyda2 Posts: 5
    Thank you!
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