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Good Styling

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  • fezofezo Posts: 9,195
    No. No. I had this more in mind...

    image

    Not only attractive but doesn't have that hideous Yankees plate on there....
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,950
    The new Caravan is a bit of a throwback isn't it? By squaring off the lines, they came up with a design that looks like the original 1980's Caravan.

    I agree with you - the new ones remind me of my '89 Voyager. I liked that boxy style a lot. Wish they made it in a SWB version still.
  • gsemikegsemike Long Island, NYPosts: 1,743
    One trend that I don't like at all is these fender lips that are really flattened out and tall. It's especially visible on the new Acura trucks. It's not well integrated into the body and makes any tires smaller than 18s look tiny. You see it on the new Altima as well and I otherwise really like that car.
  • karsickkarsick Posts: 312
    I've come to really lean toward function over form.

    Functional looks NEVER go out of style, but a faddish trend will stale quickly (hello 70's landau roofs, 80's hyper-striped mini-trucks, 90's cliche Eddie Bauer two-tone SUVs, today's chrome dubs).

    Call me wacko, but I really like the looks of this europe-only Ford Connect linked below.
    http://www.ford.co.uk/ie/tourneoconnect07/toc_photo/toc_ext_gallery/-/-/-/- -#

    Commercial-Grade utility with obvious attention paid to style. It's basically Ford's take on a miniaturized Sprinter van. I know it would play here in the NW, where we favor understated, utilitarian, faded Subaru wagons with room for bikes, climbing gear, kayaks & canoes.

    Federalize a 4cyl Duratorq turbodiesel for this (35-40mpg) and Ford would have a very unique & timely rig for sale.
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,950
    Pretty nice rig Karsick.

    I guess this is another reason why skirts never caught on:

    image

    Postmodern (AlternateRoute)
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,388
    Skirts do look good on the right car. IMO most 1950s era coupes and convertibles look good with 'em so do a few 1960s designs. One four door that wears skirting well as the Citroen ID/DS.

    I wonder what a Prius would look like with rear wheels skirts and a chrome strip along the bottom? :P
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,950
    Like an Insight?

    Saw one of those just yesterday in silver.

    image

    You don't notice that black stripe at the base of the skirt on the dark blue ones.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,388
    Yeah, maybe that's where I got the idea. Skirts and disc wheel covers seem appropriate for a vehicle designed for max aero efficiency.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,388
    It was Mercedes-Benz who first offered a four door sedan with a lowered roof trailing off into a fastback slope and oxymoronically called it a "four-door coupe".>

    image

    I for one didn't find the CLS convincing since it wasn't as good looking as the E-Class it was derived from and in fact wasn't good looking at all to me.

    Designers elsewhere took notice and before long styling leaders like Audi, BMW and Aston-Martin introduced 4-door Coupe concepts. One of those, the Aston-Martin Rapide (essentially a stretched DB9) was quickly slated for production and it was rumored that BMW's similar CS Concept was a preview of the next
    7 series.

    Now they're coming thick and fast as Volkswagen plans to introduce it's Passat CC
    later this year>

    image

    BMW's X6 (now on sale) blurs the lines even further with a combination of SUV, sedan and coupe attributes in the same vehicle. My initial reaction was "who needs it?", Subaru's high-riding AWD sedans haven't exactly burned up the market.

    Looking at it I found the styling inexplicably attractive and I couldn't understand why until I finally figured it out. IMO the term BMW is using ("Sports Activity Coupe" )
    is a bit of marketing BS but in reality it is a five-door hatch back similar to the three Saabs I've owned but no longer available from the Swedes.



    Things are getting strange when BMW starts building cars that look like Saabs and are called coupes. :confuse:
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    It was Mercedes-Benz who first offered a four door sedan with a lowered roof trailing off into a fastback slope and oxymoronically called it a "four-door coupe"

    Well, there was the 1980-85 Seville. :P And while they didn't have sloped off rears back in the 50's, some of the 4-door hardtops back in those days shared the same roof as their 2-door counterparts.

    The CLS actually makes me think of the '80-85 Seville, or a '79-81 Newport/St. Regis, in that it has frameless windows but a B-pillar, and that fixed quarter window in the back door that looks a bit funny if you open the back door with the window rolled down. Some of GM's hardtop sedans from 1958 were like that, too. Chrysler's 1956 hardtop sedans had that little quarter window, but it actually retracted down at an angle when you rolled the main window down.
  • 62vetteefp62vetteefp Posts: 6,048
    It was actually the 97 Grand Prix that was the first of the Coupe styled sedans.

    But nothing does as much as the low, sleek coupe-like roofline; remember how, just a couple of years ago, four doors meant a squared roofline?

    http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://images.automotive.com/reviews/imag- - es/00grandprix.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.automallusa.net/2000/pontiac/grand-prix/- - reviews.html&h=263&w=400&sz=39&hl=en&start=7&um=1&tbnid=RSGbu3FDFje47M:&tbnh=82&- - tbnw=124&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dgrand%2Bprix%2Breview%2Bpontiac%2B1997%2Bphoto%26um%- - 3D1%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1T4GGIC_enUS255US255">
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,950
    Those Google image search links rarely work in a cut and paste - try this:

    link
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I always thought the Rover P5 coupe (actually a sedan) was the first sedan variant to have distinctively more coupelike styling compared to its upright sedan brother. The Ford and Mercury fastback sedans of 1964 come to mind as well.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,388
    I always thought the Rover P5 coupe (actually a sedan) was the first sedan variant to have distinctively more coupelike styling compared to its upright sedan brother.

    The oddball P5 is an easy one to forget as AFAIK it never came across the Atlantic but it did indeed have a chopped roof giving it a coupelike profile>

    image

    The Ford and Mercury fastback sedans of 1964 come to mind as well

    I assume you're referring to this variation on the the Ford and Merc H/T sedans >

    image

    That's pretty tame compared to the "Nascar"-style roofs the Sports Coupes got 1963 1/2>

    image

    .
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,909
    I guess the image I had in my mind of those Fords was racier than the actual product. So I'll stand with the Rover....I guess the Ford wasn't really chopped down much, just had a more angled back window.

    Interesting ad, I don't recall seeing another that actually admits a half year like that.
  • 62vetteefp62vetteefp Posts: 6,048
    Do ou have a side view of that Rover thing? Never saw one before.
  • writerwriter Posts: 116
    The 1949 and 1950 Chev Fleetlines were true Fastbacks available in 4 door versions. I think they were called sedans. Not many sold. By 1951, I think the 4 door was dropped and by 1952 there were no fastback Chevs (until 1963's Corvette?).

    I expect the same was true for the rest of GM in those years.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,388
    The 1949 and 1950 Chev Fleetlines were true Fastbacks available in 4 door versions. I think they were called sedans

    IIRC those were called Sedanettes, they didn't employ (AFAIK) a lower roof or windshield.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,590
    If it's a lower roof and windshield you're looking for, the '57 Mopar 4-door hardtops did that. The windshield, A-pillars, vent windows in the front doors, and most of the roof structure was shared with the 2-door hardtop, although they were a bit different in the C-pillar/rear window area. They were lower and a lot more rakish than the corresponding 4-door sedans.

    Chrysler's first mass-produced 4-door hardtops, introduced for 1956, were actually 4-door sedans with the doors modified. That made them huge inside, as most hardtops are a bit tighter inside than their sedan counterparts. But it did present a problem with the door window architecture. The 4-door sedans had a rear window with a big roll-down window and a small spacer window in the back. For the hardtop, they made the spacer window pivot down at an angle, in conjunction with the roll down window. It's a neat thing to see in action, especially with power windows, but it was prone to air and water leaks.

    GM's was first to the 4-door hardtop market with the 1955 Buick and Oldsmobile B-bodies. They're definitely lower and more rakish than the 4-door sedan counterparts, but I'm not sure how much commonality they have with the 2-door hardtop. I'm guessing the windshield and A-pillars are the same, but the roof might be modified back at the C-pillar/rear window area.
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