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Toyota 3/4 Ton with Big Block V-8

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Comments

  • ryanbabryanbab Posts: 7,240
    "The Tundra is the only 1/2 ton PU to claim the following when it was introduced:"

    1. DOHC engine.
    2. ULEV engine.
    3. Pre-tensioners on seat belts
    4. Rack and pinion stearing.
    5. 4 pod front disc brakes with rear drums that stop shorter than Chev/Ford/Dodge.
    6. Rear seat head rest.
    7. Standard tranny cooler.
    8. Drive by wire.
    9. Coil on plug system with no distributor.

    Chevy trucks had rack and pinion on their 2wd trucks, 4 wheel disk, rear seat head rest

    Oh yea ND you forgot to put APRIL FOOLS after your post #326
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Posts: 1,352
    Are you blind.....or just a liar???


    If you read post #327 a lot was addressed. Either you or this site;

     http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/air/ms/lev2001list.html


    is FOS. The toy V8 is NOT LEV much less ULEV.


    BTW, I know of no automatic trans equipped car/truck that does not have a trans cooler. Now if you MEANT to say auxiliary cooler.....


    Still want to learn how short skirt pistons aid in emissions. I always thought it was a clearance issue for longer rods....but, hey, what do I know.

  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,893
    Let's back off the namecalling...


    Agree to disagree about the trucks and MOVE ON




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  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    check these links


    From newspress.com


    V8 engine delivers adequate performance, ULEV rating, stability features


    The Sequoia is powered by a 240-horsepower version of the Tundra pickup V8, a modern, 4.7-liter engine with dual overhead camshafts and four-valves per cylinder. Matched to a four-speed automatic transmission, this engine provides good acceleration and steady highway cruising at the speed limit. While some people may want a bit more torque or towing capacity, the Sequoia will certainly satisfy the performance needs of most of its buyers.


    Though mileage is not great (14/17 miles per gallon in city/highway driving on four-wheel drive models), the Sequoia engine is the first Toyota SUV engine to be EPA-certified as an ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV).


    from technofile.com


    Toyota and Ford appear to be going in opposite directions with their handsome new entries. Toyota's Sequoia - based on the company's Tundra pickup - is BIG, while the Ford Escape is much more diminutive. Sequoia, Toyota's first truck to be certified as "an ultra low emission vehicle" (ULEV) shares Tundra's V8 engine and power train, taking 240 horses off the road with you.


    http://www.deepgreenonline.com/toyota_000927.htm


    The Toyota Sequoia

    September 27, 2000

    Toyota’s Ultra-Low-Emission Sequoias Debut in Indiana

    Toyota's first Sequoia rolled off the assembly line today in Princeton, Indiana, to mark the beginning of production for the all new, full-sized sport utility vehicle. The Sequoia model is being built alongside the Toyota Tundra pickup at Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Indiana (TMMI), which is the exclusive manufacturer of both the Sequoia and the Tundra pickup truck, currently has combined capacity to produce 150,000 units each year. With production of the Sequoia, Toyota fills an important market segment for a full-size sport utility between its high-volume, mid-size 4Runner and the low-volume premium-brand Land Cruiser, though the Sequoia is significantly larger and roomier than the Cruiser.


    A “Green Monster” with Safety Features

    The Sequoia features the same 4.7-liter "i-Force" V8 engine that powers the Tundra model – an engine that produces 240 horsepower, produces 315 pounds of torque, and is the first Toyota truck engine to be EPA-certified as ULEV, or ultra-low-emission. By comparison, Sequoia's ULEV engine produces 40 percent fewer non-methane organic gases (NMOG) than the Ford Expedition's 2000 LEV V8 engine.


    And the Sequoia is as big as its name suggests. Sequoia's overall length, width, height and wheelbase ---as well as its interior volume dimensions--- are larger than those of Chevrolet Tahoe and nearly identical to those of Expedition. Its third seat and rear cargo area are more spacious than both, and its ground clearance---at more than 11 inches--- is significantly higher than both. Sequoia transports eight passengers in three rows of seating, and Toyota promises that these passengers will be transported safely. Sequoia is the first Toyota truck to feature curtain-shield side air bags and it also features three-way seat belts at all eight passenger positions.


    A Bold Move in Branding

    Sequoia sempervirens is the name of the coniferous redwood trees that grow mostly in coastal California and can reach heights of 360 feet. The tree’s wood is extremely durable and commercially important. According to Don Esmond, group vice president and general manager of Toyota North America, "Sequoia is a significant vehicle for Toyota. It deserved a significant name...Like its namesake, Sequoia stands tall, an icon of strength and longevity. It is a name that reflects Toyota's commitment to meeting customers needs, while continuing its pursuit of cleaner, more fuel-efficient engines.”


    Toyota has long needed an SUV model that could fit the market segment void between its 4Runner and Land Cruiser models to compete head-to-head with the popular SUV models of Ford and GM. Toyota’s ability to combine the SUV aspects of spaciousness and power with an EPA-certified ultra-low-emission engine and fill that niche is frankly a work of genius. Naming this vehicle after one of the most recognizable icons of America’s natural resources is equally bold. And the timing of the Sequoia’s first roll-out from Toyota’s Indiana plant adds the element of luck to the company’s genius and boldness as the backlash grows against Ford’s popular Explorer SUV.


    The Greening of Toyota

    Toyota employs more than 30,000 people in North America, including about 20,000 at its manufacturing plants in California, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, West Virginia, and Ontario and British Columbia in Canada. With the debut of the Indiana-built Sequoia and the Canadian-built Lexus RX 300 debut, Toyota produces nine vehicles in North America: Avalon, Camry, Corolla, Lexus RX 300, Sequoia, Sienna, Solara, Tacoma and Tundra.


    While some skeptics might accuse the company of environmental gimmickry to keep selling SUVs, Toyota has made great strides in improving the environmental performance of its North American operations. On August 1, 2000, Toyota Motor Manufacturing North America, Inc. announced that it was challenging its North American-based suppliers to adopt environmental standards specified in Toyota’s "Green Supplier Guidelines: Leadership in Environmental Performance" guidelines. Those guidelines extended the company's environmental commitment beyond its own direct processes to its entire supply chain. As part of the Toyota Supplier Environmental Program, approximately 500 suppliers who provide parts, materials and components directly or indirectly to Toyota are required to complete one or more of the company’s initiatives, to include obtaining ISO 14001 certification; complying with Toyota’s chemical ban list; and implementing Toyota’s Hazardous Materials Transportation Management System


    As part of its environmental commitment, Toyota Motor Corporation maintains a worldwide Earth Charter, which was first established in 1992. The Charter reinforces Toyota's goal of being the global environmental leader in both product and manufacturing process, and the Charter has served as a vehicle to help Toyota embrace the concept of environmental management systems. By the end of 2000, all of Toyota's North American manufacturing plants and facilities will be ISO 14001 certified.


    So who is the liar now? You Chevy guys sure like to distort facts :-P

  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    The Sierra was the worst ever long term tester that Edmunds had. That says volumes about how bad the Chev products are. Professional Grade my A**
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Posts: 1,352
    Your own link says the SEQUOIA is the first ULEV V8 from toy. NOT THE TUNDRA!! DOHHHHHHHH!!!.

    " Sequoia, Toyota's first truck to be certified as "an ultra low emission vehicle" (ULEV) shares Tundra's V8 engine and power train, taking 240 horses off the road with you."

    "The Sequoia features the same 4.7-liter "i-Force" V8 engine that powers the Tundra model – an engine that produces 240 horsepower, produces 315 pounds of torque, and is the first Toyota truck engine to be EPA-certified as ULEV, or ultra-low-emission. By comparison, Sequoia's ULEV engine produces 40 percent fewer non-methane organic gases (NMOG) than the Ford Expedition's 2000 LEV V8 engine."

    would you like a bigger shovel to bury yourself????

    Still waiting on your short piston skirt/low emissions explanation.
  • obyoneobyone Posts: 8,065
    Customer service says "oh yeah you have forged pistons"...and it becomes gospel. DOH!! Even Bama couldn't take that one. SHEEESH!!
  • catamcatam Posts: 331
    Since this discussion should be about work trucks, but has degraded into a comparison of half ton trucks, here is what I have to say.

    If you read the truck trend article carefully they point out that for comparison under load they loaded each truck to 75% of its rated capacity, for the Toyota this worked out to be 27 bags of rock or 1350lbs total, for the Chev it was 32 bags or 1600lbs.
    In their review of the Chevy when loaded the testers noted that the load was sufficient to smooth out the harsh ride present when unloaded.
    In the review of the Toyota here is a quote, "Once loaded with 27 bags of rock for the hauling test, the Toyota pulled a Jekyll/Hyde handling trick: Its rear springs nearly flattened out, leaving it with a nose-high, desert prerunner stance, and practically riding the bump stopped during the entire loop.

    The new running attitude also took its toll on the steering, which was slow to respond to input and a handful to drive, the front end searching for direction and the rear bobbling all over the road. Comparing apples to apples, we’d say Toyota’s payload rating is optimistic, while the Chevy’s is pessimistic. If you plan on hauling large loads in the Tundra’s bed, we’d suggest a set of helper springs."
    This also applied to the braking tests, so the Chev was stopping more weight.

    I am not saying the Toyota is a bad truck, quite the contrary, if you are buying a truck for a daily driver with occasional weekend light work the Toyota is a good choice.

    But for those defending the Toyota please stop trying to tell us it can out work/tow anything from the big 3.

    Another couple of points, first I owned a my Silverado never had any "knock", but Chevy blames the knock on piston slap caused by short piston skirts.
    You defend this problem in the Toyota but flame it in the Chevy.

    BTW, my Chevy was in for warr repair once in the 28,000 mi that I owned it. That was to replace the right rear window, that was misaligned and allowing road noise.

    Also, stating the Tundra's V8 is ULEV because the Sequioas is is wrong. Here is why the V8 in the Tundra is rated at 245HP while the one in the Seq is rated at 240. My guess is that the Tundra is minus some emission control equipment to obtain those extra few ponies.

    Distributor less ignition systems have been around since the early 90s. Chev Silverado went to coil on cyinder ignition in 99 before the Tundra was introduced. Ford had it before that.
    As somebody else pointed out rack and pinion steering has been on the GM 2wd trucks since 99.
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    The Tundra and Sequoia share the smae power plant. The CA Tundra is rated at 240 hp like the Sequoia. both power plants are produced at the same factory in Japan and are assembled in the same factory in Indiana. You are a modron alright, only take out the "d" :-P

    here let me repeat the paragragh:

    The Sequoia features the SAME 4.7-liter "i-Force" V8 engine that powers the Tundra model – an engine that produces 240 horsepower, produces 315 pounds of torque, and is the first Toyota truck engine to be EPA-certified as ULEV, or ultra-low-emission. By comparison, Sequoia's ULEV engine produces 40 percent fewer non-methane organic gases (NMOG) than the Ford Expedition's 2000 LEV V8 engine.

    What does SAME mean to you? The same engine.
  • I think anyone in here who claims Toyota will out-tow/haul the Big3 is living in a fantasy world. If we're just talking 1/2 ton to 1/2 ton, well there might be a possibility. You have to remember that the Truck Trend 1/2 ton test used the Chevs 5.3L to Toys. 4.7L. Im not sure how much towing difference the 600cc's would make. At least it would close the gap some and maybe we'd get a better idea of what the 2 were capable of.

    Second point being that the Rado outweighs the Tundra by at least 200 lbs. I believe. If the Tundra were to put the 200 pounds into the rear suspension and related components, maybe the truck wouldn't quite flatten out as much. Of course with that said, there's no telling if the extra vehicle weight would adversly affect Tundra's tow/payload ablity.

    Toyota doesn't make anything to play with the other monsters on road. Tundra is rated for 1/2 ton and should be compared as such. This goes for both sides of the discussion. It would be nice to see T.T., C&D, J.D. and others do the tests with similarly equipped engines and so on. This isn't always possible. I for one though, wouldn't be going out of my way to recommend a Tundra to anyone looking for a workhorse. I feel its capable but certainly not always superior.
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Posts: 1,352
    Here is your original babble;

    #326 of 342 Tundra innovations by ndahi12 Mar 31, 2002 (09:11 pm)
    The Tundra is the only 1/2 ton PU to claim the following when it was introduced:

    1. DOHC engine.
    2. ULEV engine.
    3. Pre-tensioners on seat belts
    4. Rack and pinion stearing.
    5. 4 pod front disc brakes with rear drums that stop shorter than Chev/Ford/Dodge.
    6. Rear seat head rest.
    7. Standard tranny cooler.
    8. Drive by wire.
    9. Coil on plug system with no distributor

    I realize that English is your second (or third?) language .............but;
    explain to me how IN YOUR OWN LINKS/POSTS it claims the sequoia is the FIRST toy to be ULEV when you're claiming the tundra was 2 years ago?

    If the California tundra/sequoia 4.7 is ULEV NOW how can you claim the tundra was when first introduced?

    Still waiting on what piston skirt/emissions have to do with each other.

    It's very obvious that the high school "degree" you got was worthless.
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    You do not lisren do you!!! The Tundra that I have is ULEV it has CA emissions and that is why it is rated at 240 hp just like the Sequoia. Even when it was introduced in 2000 the Tundra had 240 hp only. Only the CA Tundra is rated ULEV, not all the Tundras. Is that clear Modron w/o a d :-P
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    here is your answer


    The Vortec 8100’s added displacement (from 7.4 to 8.1 ltrs) comes from a stroke increase of 0.37-inches (9.4 mms). New pistons are shorter in both deck height and skirt length to minimize heat build up. A Teflon™ coating reduces friction. An especially short (.2-inch/5-mm) top ring land and a full-radius top ring design improve combustion efficiency and diminish exhaust emissions. Engineering tests reveal that specific fuel consumption--fuel used per unit of power produced--is lower by four percent in comparison with the previous Big Block V8.


    http://www.media.gm.com/product/gmc/01gmc/yukon/xl/


    Ironically it is about the GM engine, something you should know about

  • lariat1lariat1 Posts: 461
    This is interesting. If the Tundra is a ULEV it is not listed here.


    http://www.greenercars.com/byclass4.html#PST


    As a matter of fact the V8 is not even listed in any vehicle.

  • lariat1lariat1 Posts: 461
    This is interesting. If the Tundra is a ULEV it is not listed here.


    http://www.greenercars.com/byclass4.html#PST


    As a matter of fact the V8 is not even listed in any vehicle.

  • lariat1lariat1 Posts: 461
    I found a listing for the Tundra V8. According to this site it is a LEV the same as the Dodge ram, F-150 and GM trucks.


    http://www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/air/ms/01ldlevs.pdf

  • modvptnlmodvptnl Posts: 1,352
    You post links that continuously make you look like an a$$.

    I'll try it more slowly for the impaired.....The tundra was not introduced with an ULEV like you erroneously stated. The sequoia was the first toy V8 to be ULEV according to your OWN LINK!!!! Even if the tundra sequoia V8 is the same NOW(please pay attention) this would be the first ULEV V8 from toy in a truck.....NOT YOUR 2000 or when the tundra was introduced. Now let's say that your own links are wrong AND the link I provided was wrong. You never made a distinction to Ca. only tundras being ULEV until now. Keep back pedaling.

    Now to your other post that proves you're wacked. "An especially short top ring land....and a full radius top ring...." is what contributes to lower emissions. NOT THE PISTON SKIRT YOU DWEEB. Do you even read what you link? Or do like to prove yourself wrong. I'm curious now as to if you know what a "full radius top ring" is. Can't wait for you to find a link for that!!!

    I'll explain the short skirt to you since you seem to be clueless and misunderstand almost every link you read. The short skirt is probably a necessity because of extra clearance needed at BDC because of the increased stroke.

    You are sooo clueless you may be the only one on this board that doesn't realize I don't own a GM!!!
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    You do not seem to listen. The Tundra was introduced as an ULEV in CALIFORNIA. That is the model that I have. how many times do I have to repeat that for you??

    The Tundra in CA has three Cats and not two like the rest of the Tundras in other parts of the US. In that sense it has the same emission arrangement that the Sequoia has. That makes the CA Tundra a ULEV truck. Got it But then again you are a modron w/o a "d" :-P
  • kg11kg11 Posts: 530
    My dad's '56 Kaiser had an OHC on the I6 .45 years is a long time to wait to put'em on a V8.

    kip
  • lariat1lariat1 Posts: 461
    What are you talking about? here is another link it shows the Sequioa as an ULEV but no mention of the Tundra, it is interesting that even the old technology Dodge 360 is an ULEV and the 32v Tonka V8 is not.


    http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/ccbg/2002ldt.htm

  • bamatundrabamatundra Posts: 1,583
    The Dodge 360 is a gas guzzling DOG! The Dodge Lamb does not have enough ponies to get out of its own way, let alone be worked. Don't get me wrong, I would still list the Lamb above the Chev.

    Also, you are just showing California vehicles.
    I agree that the Tundra is an LEV, just like all the other 1/2 tons in the other 49 states.
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Posts: 1,352
    Since your English is poor, I'll translate:

    326 of 353 Tundra innovations by ndahi12 Mar 31, 2002 (09:11 pm)
    The Tundra is the only 1/2 ton PU to claim the following when it was introduced:

    1. DOHC engine.translation: Very important to have for less HP and torque than GM and Ford.

    2. ULEV engine. translation: ONLY IN CALIFORNIA.(maybe)

    3. Pre-tensioners on seat belts. translation:I'm sooooo impressed!

    4. Rack and pinion stearing(sic). translation:Wow!! Just like GM!!!

    5. 4 pod front disc brakes with rear drums that stop shorter than Chev/Ford/Dodge.translation: Yup, them drum brakes are true innovations!!!

    6. Rear seat head rest.translation: That you have to be a midget to use. Oh, GM has headrests???

    7. Standard tranny cooler.translation: Who doesn't???

    8. Drive by wire. translation: Dang, that adds HP, torque, load capacity......

    9. Coil on plug system with no distributor. translation:Just like Ford on all their modulars after '97??

    If you need any more help, professor, whether writing or comprehending your own links, let me know.
  • lariat1lariat1 Posts: 461
    Ndahi specifically stated that he has the Tundra with the California emissions so I dont know if he was told he bought an ULEV by the salesman or what.
    Also from the gas guzzling standpoint the 360 is not any worse in my view than any other V8. I had 2 97 Fords with the 4.6 and I got worse gas mileage than I do with the 360, a friend of mine has a 2001 Tundra and he gets 1 mpg better than me in the city, we get the same on the highway and I get 2 mpg better towing. I have accepted the fact that unless I buy another Cummins the best MPG I will get with a truck is around 18 mpg. The reason I have a Ram and not a Tundra is that my sons car seat would not fit in the Tundra.
  • bamatundrabamatundra Posts: 1,583
    1. Four valve per cylinder DOHC engine that will eat any Furd 5.4 L F150 alive in 0-60 and quarter mile. Where are all those ponies - cowering in the barn? The GM Whimperado with the 5.3L only beat the Tundra by .2sec 0 to 60 and quarter mile. The Tundra had a higher trap speed. Are GM's ponies hiding with the Furd's?

    2. LEV in 49 states just like the Furd and the Whimperado. Granted - not an advantage, but personally, I could care less.

    3. Seatbelt pretensioners. Furd Stuporduty owners don't care about safety? I do.

    4. Rack and Pinion steering. GM does not have on their 4WD wimperados. No one else does either.

    5. Four caliper front brakes. None of the other 1/2 tons have them. Yes, very innovative. Maybe GM will fix those dangerously weak Chevette brakes they put on their trucks.

    6. Rear seat headrests. Furd didn't have them in '00. GM did. I would not buy a Furd deathtrap.

    7. Standard tranny cooler. GM and Furd are options.

    8. Drive by wire. Toyota is first - innovative.

    9. Coil on plug. Toyota Direct ignition. NO PLUG WIRES. What were you spouting about Furd and GM? Your ignorance is showing.

    Muddy - open mouth, insert foot! LMFAO!
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Posts: 1,352
    In the test you LOVE to tout as gospel, the GM put nearly 40 more RWHP to the ground.

    I'll be honest(something you nor nd would know about) I don't know what pre tension belts are, don't care. My Super Duty belts retract just fine and lock when braking hard.

    Funny, even with R&P steering the toy felt "vague" with a load.....again, your test, your bible.

    Brakes??? Your own gospel again showed the GM only losing 7' with a LARGER load than the toy. The toy lost 14'. HMMMMMMMM, stronger brakes on the toy? I think not. Seems the toy brakes wilt when worked...or is that warp when worked.

    Thought in the past you'd only buy a Ford 1 ton when compared to GM/Dodge. Do you forget what you post??? Bs'ers usually do.

    They all have tranny coolers. You nor nd would know the diff between a standard or aux. cooler.

    Goofball, my V10 Ford has no plug wires. pretty sure Fords had coil on plug since '98 and distributorless since the first modulars and last 5.0's.

    How's that shoe leather tasting there, blama???
  • ryanbabryanbab Posts: 7,240
    "Standard tranny cooler. GM and Furd are options"

    Tells you something there

    Gm and ford trucks dont really need it but if you want it to ease your mind its there. Toyota you have to get it cause the truck needs it to survive
  • if GM and Ford came standard with trans coolers and Toyota didn't, I somehow get the feeling the GM/Ford guys would be knocking the Tundra for lacking it as a standard option. Then they would be saying how real trucks come standard with them and the play toys don't. So that post means nothing as far as im concerned. Truck owners from all sides will find something that is unique to their truck and then brag about its importance, even if it really isn't important at all. Just goes back to being a kid, and look what I have that you don't.
  • modvptnlmodvptnl Posts: 1,352
    All automatic equipped vehicles that I've EVER seen have a trans cooler built into the radiator. A heat exchanger if you will.

    As GVW goes up or as the need arises, you can add aux. coolers in-line with the stock cooler.

    The V8 tundra supercharger has been delayed numerous times because the power keeps frying transmissions(even with an added cooler)Kudos for toy for not releasing it but it shows how weak the standard toy trans really is.

    Funny, the supercharged Lightning has no such trans problems.
  • ndahi12ndahi12 Posts: 235
    We are not tlaking about a puny heat exchanger that is barely the size of the palm of your hand. We know that automatics have those. We are talking about a real tranny cooler that is attached in front of the radiator. that is the tranny cooler that comes stock on the tundra and optional on the Chevy. Get it Modron!!!

    Yes you cna add a tranny cooler later one, but the point is that the Tundra has it STOCK.
This discussion has been closed.