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Subaru Crew Cafe

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Comments

  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    I wonder if the Forester XT and BMW X3 could be called "Brute Cute Utes?"

    Bob
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I think they should called SUVs and let's rename everything else! ;-)

    -juice
  • tyguytyguy ColoradoPosts: 804
    Is it legal to post manufacturer service bulletin information on a web forum? I have a service bulletin that some may find helpful, and I would like to post the bulletin number and details, but I don't want to get Edmunds, Subaru reps, or myself into any legal trouble. What do you think? Moderators?
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    If it's from NHTSA, just post a link. People do it all the time.

    -juice
  • tyguytyguy ColoradoPosts: 804
    The document I have isn't from NHSTA. It's an official doc from Subaru to the dealers regarding the cold clutch "judder" (Subaru's term for shutter/chatter). I did a search for the number on the NHTSA site, but nothing came up.

    -Ty
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    http://www.vwvortex.com/

    http://www.subdriven.com/

    Apparently VWvortex.com & Subdriven.com are done by the same folks! The cover story on both sites features the same cars. Also listed on the left are other car sites they do.

    More info on these guys and their other car sites:

    http://www.vortexmediagroup.com/about.html

    Bob
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I don't like subdriven.com cause they are a bunch of guys just capitalizing on the subaru market, they aren't die-hard subie guys like the other sites. I'm not a big fan of "johnny come latelys"

    :(

    I'm more of a grassroots type of guy personally.

    -mike
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Well I knew it would happen eventually...

    Trooper = 1
    Lexus LS430 = 0

    Coming to work today a lady in a brand new lexus on the phone is behind me goes to drive around me and clips my right rear bumper. She smacked right into the bumper protector. Pulls up next to me and say "I think I bumped you" I said "It's ok I'm sure it's ok" The front of her car was a tweaked, she'll need a new $700 bumper, once I got to work I checked it out, paint wasn't even taken off the trooper's bumper protector :)

    Yippie!

    -mike
  • grahampetersgrahampeters AustraliaPosts: 1,589
    G'day

    A special pleasure for Paisan

    I used to get the same joy from BMW's in snow drifts.

    Cheers

    Graham
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    My older Subies were either a front wheel drive or an "on-demand" four wheel drive. When purhasing my new Forester yesterday, the salesman told us that with the new AWD, when one wheel skids or slips, the electronic system compensates by sending power to the wheel needing it? Sorry if I can't explain it better. But, we purchased a manual (more fun to drive), and when reading the brochure at home, found that the manual transmission is different in that it sends power to the front and back wheels 50-50, and is therefore not the same AWD system as the models with the Automatic transmission. What is the real difference? Which system is the older, more reliable system? The salesman said that they have a 1990 full time AWD Loyale in the yard so this system has been around for a long time (when I expressed by concern about too much electronic stuff that can go wrong). But which system did those older full-time AWD Subies have?
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    I asked this question before, about 6 months ago, and need some more enlightenment. I keep my cars a long time, so I need to rustproof my new Forester. The dealer wants $500 to do it, but we have always used yearly oil treatments to keep the rust off the farm trucks. Should I do the dealer treatment (rip-off?) and then still do the annual oil treatment? Or, do I only have the dealer treatment done, or only the oil treatment? Does anyone here have personal experience? The last one I had done at a dealer rusted through (preforated) at 8 years old, but the dealer tells me both the vehicles and the rust treatment methods have improved.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    What year was your car? The OLDER subies were FWD and then you had to engage the 4wd manually.

    On the newer systems they use a viscous center diffy with a 50/50 torque split that essentially puts power to both driveshafts at the same time. If the front slips more power is sent to the rear and visa versa. In addition you probably have a rear LSD which does the same thing except from left to right in the rear.

    On the 4EAT transmissions prior to '96 you had a 90/10 torque split using an electromagnetic clutchpack in the AT. Post '95 it went to a 80/20 split. Now the VTD/VDC 4EAT has a 45/55 torque split and more clutch packs than the older ones.

    -mike
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    My Chaser was a 1987 and it was front wheel drive with "on-demand" 4wd which I could engage (it made a "clunk" sound and I could hear the rear engage)...but it could only be used on wet pavement or soil/gravel and not dry. My 1993 Loyale wagon is front wheel drive only (still have that one...great car), my brother in law's 1992 Loyale is the same system as the Chaser was, and my mom's 1998 Impreza is full time AWD with automatic transmission. The salesman was talking about a 1990 Loyale with AWD full time, which I thought was not around that early.

    So what is the difference in the way the AWD works if you have a manual or automatic transmission. Here is the confusing paragraph from the brochure which makes it look like the 2003 Forester has two types of AWD systems, depending on what transmission type you pick:

    "Manual transmission models split engine power 50/50 between front and rear wheels. Models with automatic transmission use Active All-Wheel Drive, an electronically controlled muliplate transfer clutch for maximum traction".

    I don't have the LSD since that is only available in the 2.5XS model.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Was out in '88 on the XT6 in both MT and AT.

    MT System: Viscous Coupled Center diffy, moves power front to rear based on slippage with a 50/50 initial torque split and a 60/40 40/60 range of movement.

    AT System: Electronically controlled torque splitting unit 80/20 intial torque split up to 50/50 depending on slippage, weight distribution, etc.

    The AT system uses sensors to give input to the transmission which splits the power, based on those inputs it shifts the power around.

    Hope this helps.

    -mike
  • Most likely only the dealer's sales pitch has improved. I have a 10.5 year old Camry and it doesn't have a bit of rust, even though it sits out and has spent most of its life in the snow belt. With all the plastic on cars and in the wheel wells and highway crews avoiding road salt for environmental reasons, I see no reason to rust proof a car, unless you like contributing $500 to the dealer's children's college education fund. I like to know how you oiled your car down. I do wash my vehicle almost every weekend unless the weather is unbearable or snow is going to hit within 24 hours. It probably averages 47-50 washes per year.
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    Subaru should have hired you to write their brochures. Thanks for clearing up the confusion!
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    We oiled our truck by bringing it to a body shop every fall where they spray oil underneath and in all the nooks an cranies. It is then protected for the winter.

    I just paid a visit to the owner of the body shop and asked him the question. He said the $500 is a waste of money. The oil treatment is as good and probably better at covering all the protential rusting places. What he told me that is very interesting is that you should never park a car on grass or even bare earth because that holds in dampness and it creeps in under the car. Salt is an enemy he said, but humidity is very bad as well. Park your car on dry pavement or on crushed stone.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Heard the same about grass as well.

    -mike
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    The last we heard from you, you were set on getting an Impreza TS. I thought the Forester was out of your price range?

    Bob
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Both AWD systems are extremely reliable, I'm not sure if I've ever once heard of an AWD system fail.

    I prefer the feel of the manual's viscous coupling because it sends more power to the rear axle by default. The Auto's system is more sophisticated but feels more like FWD.

    Both are probably more than you'll need.

    Saw a post at 12:26 in another topic that you'd bought the Forester. Congrats!

    -juice
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    my husband did not want to pay the extra C$5000 for the Forester, however our accountant told us that if the vehicle has resonable cargo space so that for example we can fit 2 bales of hay in it (so count out the Impreza), and drive to the fields with spare parts for our tractors and equipment, and can proove with a logbook how much it is used for the farm, then 60% of the purchase cost and expenses can be written off. Besides, my husband wrecked our spare Chevy truck which was for my use so we are short a farm vehicle. And to top it all off, HE DROVE A FORESTER. That did it. So now the papers are all signed and I am waiting for the dealer to phone with a vehicle registration number and date he expects delivery. I hope everything will be OK. I wanted a Silver with manual transmission, which he didn't have on the lot but said he could get.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    So the drive was the key, cool.

    Funny and true story. My sister had cross-shopped a Forester and a Camry, remember? Well, she bought the Forester. Now it's in to have some accessories installed, and she got a loaner....Camry!

    Hilarious. I asked and she said that after driving the Camry around for a 2nd day, she still preferred her Forester. Cool.

    For the mechanics in this group, check out the Miata thread for the story on the clutch slave cylinder rebuild on the Miata. Finally got that done, and took some pics that may come in handy later for someone.

    -juice
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    <grin>

    We'll be interested in your comments as to the Forester pans out as a "farm truck."

    You might even consider getting the factory/dealer trailer hitch. If you get a light utility trailer, I'm sure you can get a bunch of bales of hay, and not worry about getting that straw all over the interior. Juice has used my 5'x8' utility trailer behind his 5-speed Forester several times to get loads of mulch.

    The Forester 5-speed is rated to pull 2400 pounds. If you're just going to use it in the fields for hauling hay, it should be fine. Out on the highway you should have trailer brakes to pull over 1000 pounds, but I would think that the low speeds in the fields wouldn't be a problem. Also, the Hill-Holder clutch should make it less stressfull on the drivetrain when pulling a trailer. I would seriously think about that option.

    Bob
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    First North American test on the Touareg that I've seen.

    http://www.thecarconnection.com/index.asp?article=6111&sid=18- 1&n=157

    Bob
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
  • joybelljoybell Posts: 275
    Well, I don't think I will haul hay bales with it. That was just an example the accountant gave us in order to have a vehicle qualify for farm use. But I will definately have to drive into the fields with all kinds of greasey/oily replacement parts for broken down equipment. The dealer threw in a rubber mat for the cargo area in the back (at least he gave us something for free for paying full M.S.R.P.). I also bring lunches and water, etc at harvest time. I am sure the Forester can do that very well.

    My conern right now is why the dealer hasn't called with a registration number and delivery dates. I hope he doesn't call and say that there are no manual silver 2.5x models left! After being patient for so long, I am now VERY impatient!
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,661
    Even so, a small lightweight trailer could make the Forester really pay for itself. You could certainly haul a half-dozen bales of hay, tools, lumber, etc. It could be much more useful than just an errand runner. You may already have such a trailer, since you have a farm.

    The rubber cargo mat is very good to have. You might also get the rear rubber bumper pad. You never know when something might scuff up the bumper, especially considering how you might use the car.

    You also have a roof rack that's rated to carry 150 pounds too.

    Bob
  • You shouldn't park over drains, sewers, etc. The humidity that comes out settles on your engine parts which I've heard isn't good. It would also get into the crevices of your auto body.

    Your body shop probably uses a high pressure gun to coat the car with oil. You can probably duplicate that either with a low or high pressure applicator. Obviously a HP applicator would be better, but you can probably do as nearly as good a job with a low pressure applicator. What does your body shop charge for an oil application? i believe that you said that it was done annually. Sounds like your talking fairly big $$. Again the way cars are built nowadays I'd question the necessity of even doing that. If you've ever leased a car the dealers don't rust proof them. Their reasoning is that rust won't show up during the life of the lease. There was another famous rust proofing system of about 25-30 years ago (forget name), but they guaranteed their treatment for five years. The catch is that it will almost always take longer than five years for rust to show up. Bottom line is that you don't see the rust buckets on the road that you saw 30-40 years ago, even near the ocean where you're near salt water. Whatever money it costs, I'd keep it in your pocket. The college fund may be going towards the body shop owner's kids instead.
  • lark6lark6 Posts: 2,565
    That's one of the roles my Forester plays, Joybell, though in my case not for farm equipment but for my old Studebaker. (Some would argue there's little difference between the two.)

    Ed
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