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BMW 335i 2007+

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  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,400
    I wonder how this tranny will perform?

    The IS-F is based on the rear-wheel-drive Lexus IS, which is equipped with a double-wishbone front and multi-link rear suspension. The IS-F engine is mated to the world’s first eight-speed "direct sport-shift" transmission. A new torque-converter lock-up control was developed that allows for a direct, crisp gear change through the constant lock-up of the torque converter in second through eighth gears.

    In Drive mode, the IS-F transmission performs smoothly, and the torque converter allows for quick 0-60 acceleration in less than 4.9 seconds. The transmission also features a manual mode operated via a pair of paddles. Downshifts are accompanied by automated throttle blips to match engine RPM to vehicle speed. Heavy-duty Brembo brakes with 14.2-inch discs and six-piston calipers ensure all the power is kept under control. The IS-F features custom-designed 19-inch forged alloy wheels — with 225/40R19 sized rubber up front and 255/35R19 at the rear — as standard.

    Lexus claims the IS-F can hit a top speed of over 185 mph but the Japanese-spec IS-F will be electronically limited to about 110 mph. Lexus failed to address why the IS-F is limited to such a low speed as the car will undoubtedly be able to hit that speed in the 1/4 mile.


    Seems to me the future "sports" cars will receive AT's that are progressivley more competent. Chevy is working on a 2-clutcher for the 2012 'Vette.

    Regards,
    OW
  • getzgetz Posts: 24
    Exhibit A: Regarding the 335i Coupe with AT
    http://www.caranddriver.com/shortroadtests/13548/tested-2007-bmw-335i-coupe-auto- matic.html

    "Maybe BMW got bored of hearing the same thing over and over again, because suddenly we had to come up with new words to describe the 3: controversially styled, technologically overwrought, and now this: quicker with the automatic.

    Fantastic as an Automatic
    Yes, the 335i’s ZF-sourced six-speed automatic is among the world’s very best transmissions, and we can’t heap enough praise on it. Responsive and quick to act, it is the perfect autobox for this kind of car. In normal automatic mode, shifts are virtually invisible, but the character changes dramatically when prompted. Deputy editor Dave VanderWerp says, “Full-throttle downshifts are quite severe, but to me, that’s fine when I’m pushing the pedal all the way to the floor. The automatic generally does a single multigear kickdown instead of stopping off at other ratios along the way.” We also noted snappy rev-matching throttle blips when downshifting using the manumatic function (or paddles), and in the sport-shift mode, it eagerly takes the liberty of automatically downshifting during braking to set you higher in the meat of the power band whenever your right foot returns to the other pedal."

    Exhibit B: Regarding the 6speed M5
    http://www.caranddriver.com/comparisons/12144/2007-audi-s6-vs-2007-bmw-m5-vs-200- 7-mercedes-benz-e63-amg.html

    "Would you be surprised to hear that this doesn’t have a positive effect on acceleration? Or lap times on the Streets of Willow? Or making a hot exit from a slow corner? Of course you wouldn’t. Because that’s precisely what happens. This M5 was a half-second slower to 60 mph than the SMG version we tested in January 2006 — 4.7 versus 4.2 — and a half-second slower through the quarter-mile: 13.0 seconds at 114 mph versus 12.5 at 118. DSC also inhibited lane-change performance (60.8 mph versus 65.6) and skidpad results (0.83 lateral g versus 0.89)."

    Both articles seem to refute the claim that MTs significantly outperform ATs, and with the rapidity of technological evolution, how far out can the virtual extinction of the third pedal be. I have yet to try the audi dsg, however, I have a feeling that it may speed the inevitable demise of MTs in performance vehicles.

    -Getz
  • It's interesting to see that one's ability to drive a car w/ manual transmission becomes a "status symbol" here in the US. Where I was born (and learned to drive) most cars had manual transmission, no exception. Honda was the first one to try marketing AT there in the 1975. Didn't sell very well for some reason. A friend of mine's mom bought one, and ended up hitting the car in front of her because she revved up the engine like a manual while waiting at a traffic light :)

    Things have changed in the past 5 years, many offers auto as an option - a complete reverse of what we have here.

    I drove my first automatic when I moved to the US some years ago. While I like manual better for certain reasons, I enjoy AT for convenience. An SMG would be ideal, but Steptronic will do...
  • dan 12 you said you bought the sport susp.3 over the "plain" driving non-sprt 3. I am in the same boat. I had a sprt 3 330 and I thought it drove a little rough and was a little noisy. How does the 335 sprt. and non sprt. compare? Do you like luxury or do you in general like "go karts"? I would like this for an everyday cruiser. Does the non sprt feel sporty at all? Does it wallow in the turns or does it handle good. Does it live up to the "sport sedan" legend at all? Thanks
  • dan12dan12 Posts: 114
    I think the non SP 335 is still a really nice car. If you don't need the extra handling edge of the SP, then the non-SP will be smoother. The thing that I would really miss without the SP are the front seats. I do think they are a lot more comfortable. You can try them out at a dealership without even test driving the car; you will see what I mean.

    I actually like luxury and really good handling, it just depends on the car. In the case of the 3, I decided to go for the go-kart feel. It's super smooth on good roads, but does get bumpy when the roads are in bad shape. Since you had the 330 SP, you will know exactly what I mean.

    Good luck.

    Dan
  • Yeah, Dan, I know what you mean. The sport seats are in the 3 and the best seats I have ever sat in. The power lumbar is incredible. It is so disappointing that you cant get the spt. seats in the 3 without the spt suspension. In the 5 you can get the spt. seats alone without the spt suspension. I wish they would do that on the 3, their best selling car.
  • tayl0rdtayl0rd Posts: 1,938
    Well, in the 5 they're actually called Comfort Seats and were an option with the Premium Package, IIRC, but you could also get order them with the SP. I don't think the 5 had any actual "sport" seats. For '07/'08, the Comfort Seats became an included part of the SP.
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    The previous generation 5-series most definitely had a sport seat option. And those sport seats were far more to my liking than the "comfort" seats. More side bolstering that kept you planted in turns. Not sure about the newest 5-series, as I haven't been in the market for a new sedan lately.
  • dan12dan12 Posts: 114
    For comfort I would definitely go with the 5 series over the 3. It's roomy and smooth and if you went with the 535 you would have a good amount of power too. The Comfort Seats are great. That may be my next car... in 6 years or so.
  • I am assuming that the comfort seats are the same as the sport seats in the 5 series although they dont "sound" sporty. It may be a marketing ploy to get more people to buy them. More people usually want comfort at this price level. Personally, I like both but I dont want my teeth rattled and I dont want to hear the road humming and I dont want to hear wind noise. All three of these to me cheapens the car. I agree that side-bolstering is paramount if you are corning with any enthusiasm at all.
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    I am assuming that the comfort seats are the same as the sport seats in the 5 series although they dont "sound" sporty.

    Again, only from my experience with the previous generation 5-series, "comfort" and "sport" were two very different seats. The comfort had multiple adjustments and was more "soft" for lack of a better term. The sport seats were more Recaro like in design and side bolstering, both in the seat and shoulders. Overweight people would love the comfort seats, but would have a tough time fitting into the sport seats.
  • dan12dan12 Posts: 114
    FWIW, I sat in the sport seats and comfort seats in the new X5 and they are different. The sport seats are very supportive but more stiff than the comfort seats. If you are looking for comfort, the comfort seats are the ones to go with. I assume the 5 series seats are similar if not identical to the X5.
  • Hmmmmm, so I take it that the comfort seats are the only ones available for the 2008 5 since they are the only ones mentioned in the forums. I have heard that the comfort seats are the sport seats in the new 5's with the inflatable bolstering and multiple adjustments. Did they discontinue the spt seats? Are they really trying to soften up the 5?
  • tayl0rdtayl0rd Posts: 1,938
    I think most owners/potential owners found the Comfort seats were actually better than the Sport seats when it came to support and generally holding the driver in position due to their gajillion-way positioning. The traditional Sport seats were, in a sense, dropped in favor of the Comfort seats. Now, I think the standard seat is the "old" Sport seat.

    And when you think about it, it makes sense. The whole point of a sport seat is to cradle the driver behind the wheel. The Comfort seat has way more adjustability for cradling which means it would actually make a better sport seat than the Sport seat. Or you could just look at it as a highly adjustable sport seat.
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    The Comfort seat has way more adjustability for cradling which means it would actually make a better sport seat than the Sport seat.

    Sorry, I have to disagree. Again, based upon the previous 5 series, the comfort seat was of significantly "softer" construction and did not have the degree of side, shoulder and thigh bolstering of the sport seat. For some preferring a softer feel, the comfort seat might be better, but for those wanting a true Recarro style sport seat, the comfort seat was not nearly as form fitting. The only thing missing from the sport seat was a 5 point harness.

    And, FWIW, "20 way adjustable" isn't the metric for sport. My former Honda S2000 had exceptionally good, comfortably, form fitting sport seats. And no power adjustments, whatsoever. Manual forward and back and manual seatback angle. That was it. If you happened to have a 36"+ waist or extra 30 lbs in your rear, forget it. But if you were 6'2" or under and of reasonable athletic build, they were every bit as good as the power, multi-adjustable sport seats in my 911.

    I don't think most people buying a 5 series, with the exception of the 550i 6-speed or M5, would be too distraught over the loss of the sport seat option, if in fact that's the current situation. But they were my personal favorites in any sedan.
  • bdkinnhbdkinnh Posts: 292
    >"I don't think most people buying a 5 series, with the exception of the 550i 6-speed or M5, would be too distraught over the loss of the sport seat option"

    I am. :(

    I'm getting the 535i SP, and if I could switch for the sport seats in the 335i I would. The ones in the 5 are nice (the side bolsters are good), but I like the ones in the 3 better since they have adjustable thigh side bolsters.

    Having both would be perfect.
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,400
    I would change car choice for the sports seats in the 3'er. Unbelievably un-paralleled,IMHO.

    Regards,
    OW
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    Point taken. The 535i SP is plenty sporting, and probably a more prudent buy than the 550i at this point.
  • flightnurseflightnurse 35K feetPosts: 1,689
    Depends on how you look at it, a friend has a 550i and I have to say, its a wonderful car. Power is RIGHT there when you need it. If you load a 535i to the level of a 550i the price difference isn't really that much difference. But also the people who buy a 550i the difference doesn't make much difference to them.
  • I completely agree with "just say no" to automatic transmissions on sports cars. Kind of like "death before decaf" with regards to coffee....

    I am new to this forum and have been reading the old entries for the last hour, mostly to see what the low-down on the 335i is...

    I leased my first BMW in 1/07... a black/black 335i sedan with manual/SP/PP/satelite radio/cold weather... I absolutely love the car. A bit snug with 2 car seats in the back, but that is a rare occurance... mom's car is usually used for family outings.

    The performance is impressive... so far the only car I have bowed down to from street start is the senior partner's '07 m5 with the M button pushed (500hp).. and he looked suprised when I was just a few feet behind him at 50mph... (losers so far: numerous Mustangs, 911 cabrio (that was fun... VERY shocked look on his face at the next light), Audi RS4 (a tie), 540i manual).

    Finally a tech question... anybody else have to add oil prior to one year change interval? I figured I would have to, but it felt very soon (after 5k miles).

    Keep up the good forum, guys!

    P.S. Anybody know when the Dinan chip for the 335i is being released? I heard the N54 engine (in the 335i) was seen in a Z4 in Europe, putting out >400hp... is this true?
  • cezar1cezar1 Posts: 2
    I think I would like to know any comments about this model that is why I diddn't categorize it more. What is your buying experience,price paid, any problems?
    Anybody with small kids?
    I know this is not a family car but for a father that has to pick up kids from school twice a week I would like to know.
  • kominskykominsky Posts: 850
    I would say if you're dealing with car seats, a 4-door would be MUCH easier. If the kids are big enough to crawl in and buckle themselves up, the coupe will be be fine. When I got my 330Ci, my kids were 7 and 10 years old. They had no problem. Now, at 13 and 16 years old, and very much bigger, it's still the vehicle they prefer to travel in whenever possible.
  • cezar1cezar1 Posts: 2
    I think my younger one is going to be out of a car seat next year and I am getting ready to get back what I like instead what I need. No car seats in my next car. I have two boys and they are very handy with seat belts. I do not plan to have more than four of us in the car in seldom occasions so lack of five seat is not really an issue.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,856
    anybody else have to add oil prior to one year change interval? I figured I would have to, but it felt very soon (after 5k miles).

    A quart in 5K miles is completely normal. I've had Bimmers that used less than 1/2 quart in 8K miles, and I've had another that has used a quart every 2K-2.5K since new. I would consider changing the oil ever 7.5K, as I'm hearing that the twin turbo engine is pretty hard on oil.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • Some people say its not good to go over 100 mph with a car thats less that 1000 miles. I went 135 mph with my 500 miles 335i, and is wondering if thats bad for the car? Or it doesnt really matter for a BMW? If its bad for the car...how? Can you guys help me out with my question?
  • circlewcirclew Posts: 8,400
    If you did this on public roads, you are flirting with disaster. Don't worry about the car. I worry about your safety and others.

    If you did it on a track, as long as you did not over rev in any gear, the engine is fine. The tires are also freshly broken in after 500 miles so you are ok.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

    Regards,
    OW
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    "Some people say its not good to go over 100 mph with a car thats less that 1000 miles."

    While it is true that "some people" say not to do that to your new car, the fact that the BMW engineers that designed and built your car say it too (check your manual of you don't believe me) means that YES it is indeed not good to exceed 100 mph on a car with only 500 miles on it. FWIW, the normal BMW break-in mileage is 1,200 miles, after which you can gradually increase your top speed.

    Best Regards,
    Shipo
  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTPosts: 7,994
    did you buy or lease your 335i?

    2001 Prelude Type SH, 2011 Pilot EX-L 4WD, 2015 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,856
    FWIW, the normal BMW break-in mileage is 1,200 miles, after which you can gradually increase your top speed.

    Some of my friends take long European vacations so that their new ED BMW will be broken-in. After that, they hit the autobahnen in anger- as the Brits say ;)
    With the turbo engines I'd want to follow Munich's break-in regimen to the letter, especially in light of the oil dilution issues some cars are experiencing.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

This discussion has been closed.