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2001 - 2006 Honda CR-Vs

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Comments

  • motordavidmotordavid Posts: 39
    Our '03 has had "wheel shimmy" from about day 2, at nearly any speed, though at highway speeds it is developed over the past 2 years into nearly horrible.
    -I've had a Stlr "wheel balance and alingment" on the oem wheel & tire combo, on my dime.
    -A add'l wheel balance on a Hunter top of line balance machine via priv. garage.
    -18 months ago I installed new, near Plus1 sized aftermkt wheels and tires: 2 Hunter balances on these in the past yr and a half.
    -another wheel alingment at a privateer specialist: he noted the Toe was the
    worst he had ever seen
    -another wheel balance at Stlr, my dime; said everything was "fine" and that CR-Vs were not designed for high speed?! You can't make this stuff up.
    -two new front tires on the Plus 1 set up w/another Hunter alingment (4 diff balance shops at this point, by the bye)

    We still have a low, slight wheel shimmy at even low speeds, espc. up hills under very low throttle and 15-25 mph, a near violent wheel shake at highway speeds, eg 55-70, accompianed by a feeling like driving on square wheels, and the near ubiquitous PTTR situ.

    The Stlr says all the above is "normal", lmao, I've about given up. I've owned and driven a lot of cars over the the past 40 years; none has ever run so rough or been so front end glitchy as this thing. I realize the fans and zealots here, love theirs...I would just like to "like" ours. BR,md
  • Do I need to go to my dealer for Honda Antifreeze, or can I get it at any parts store??? Thanks Fishhead
  • mikefm58mikefm58 Posts: 2,882
    I'm not sure about the 2005 model year, but for my '99, the answer was yes.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    Do I need to go to my dealer for Honda Antifreeze, or can I get it at any parts store??? Thanks Fishhead

    If you can find BLUE antifreeze that is specifically designed for Honda engines at your local store, then yes. Otherwise Honda dealer is your answer.
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    "....and the near ubiquitous PTTR"

    Really? So there's close to a half million 2G CR-Vs on the road and they all pull to the right? I better stay off the roads. Me thinks you've let a few here cloud your perception of what really is (and isn't) a problem.
  • theracoontheracoon Posts: 666
    "....and the near ubiquitous PTTR"

    So there's close to a half million 2G CR-Vs on the road and they all pull to the right? I better stay off the roads. Me thinks you've let a few here cloud your perception of what really is (and isn't) a problem.


    I have to agree with drive62 that "ubiquitous" is a gross exaggeration. I believe that at most, a few percent of CR-Vs experience the problem. That's still thousands of CR-Vs with the problem. And PTTR was a problem with some 1st Gen CR-V's, too.

    And I disagree with drive62 that it isn't a problem. If your CR-V has PTTR then it is a problem, regardless of what anyone else thinks.

    JM2C
  • finn1125finn1125 Posts: 1
    While making tight radius turns or spinning tires on wet pavement a high pitched noise eminates from the rear wheels/axle area does anybody have a suggestion as to what this might be..
  • theracoontheracoon Posts: 666
    You have an LX with RT4WD, or an EX or SE, right? Sounds like this is your problem:

    Edmunds CR-V FAQ #3 - RT4WD Fluid Needs Replacing

    Good luck.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Is it speed-dependent? If so it might be wheel bearings. We had one go out on our 626.

    -juice
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    Maybe I'm being a bit sensitive but you say "have to agree" like I never have made a decent point. I think I tend to take a logical objective look at many of the issues reported here and express my views which I don't think have been too "out there".

    As for the PTTR. I agree that someone who experiences it has a problem. Just like someone whose door rattles has a problem. Lots of problems with vehicles out there.

    From what I have gleaned, the PTTR is related to either an alignment issue or a tire issue. Sure, some have posted about bent frames or this or that but that has to be the exception and not the rule. Until someone proves otherwise I believe the problem can be solved by addressing one or both of the aforementioned issues.
  • drive62,
    You are "out there" on the CRV PTTR problem being an alignment issue or a tire issue. You need to go back and read the multiple posts on PTTR and how virtually everyone that had the displeasure of PTTR had the dealer try these remedies (alignment and tire rotation and change) that did nothing to rectify the problem. The Honda dealers and Honda Manufacturer repeatedly state that PTTR is a natural and accepted phenomena of the CRV. Steve
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  • jimcojimco Posts: 7
    I think I’ve narrowed down my choices to the Honda CR-V LX AWD or the Toyota Highlander 4-cylinder, 4WD Base and I’d like your opinion.

    Based on Edmunds TMV, the price I can expect to pay is only $2422 more for the Highlander, which makes it a good value, considering the extra features it has. That includes an $800 incentive/rebate on the Highlander.

    I drove both of them today. The CR-V seems more responsive when I accelerate but the Highlander has a more comfortable and quieter ride. I live in the mountains in Colorado and have a 20-mile commute that is mostly uphill from work to home. Both cars downshift a lot when I accelerate going up the mountains but the Honda shifts a lot smoother and is less noticeable than the Highlander.

    The Highlander has more safety features, including limited-slip differential, brake assist, and traction control. It also has more amenities such variable-intermittent wipers, a cargo cover, auxiliary visors, and a clock separate from the radio.

    The gas mileage is about the same – 27/22 for the CRV and 25/21 for the Highlander.

    I like the size of the CR-V. The Highlander is larger than I need.

    What are your opinions?
  • fredddfreddd Posts: 14
    If safety is a major concern of yours you might want to take a closer look what the CR-V offers standard. I don't know what the highlander has standard, so you may well be correct in stating it has more safety features, but the CR-V has side-curtain airbags, front and rear, as standard equipment. After taking a close look at the results of simulated crashes on the highway sefety whateveritis website I came to the conclusion that curtain bags are crucial to car safety. It influenced my decision to go with the CR-V over the Pilot LX, on which curtain bags are an option.

    Good luck.
  • theracoontheracoon Posts: 666
    The CR-V seems more responsive when I accelerate

    This isn't suprising. The CR-V LX RT4WD is about 300 lbs lighter than the Highlander 4 cylinder with 4WD, while the engines are nearly identical in terms of power and torgue.

    Is there a reason you aren't comparing the CR-V to the Rav4? Although the comparison then tilts the other direction. The Rav4 is about 300 lbs lighter than the CR-V and slightly smaller overall.

    Both Toyota and Honda have excellent reputations for quality and reliability. Either would be an excellent choice.

    (better than an Explorer or Escape, for example)
  • mikefm58mikefm58 Posts: 2,882
    I've got an '04 HL and a '99 CRV, but know a couple folks with the current gen. CRV and based on what you've stated I think you'd be happier with the CRV. You said the CRV is more responsive and just the right size for you. But then again, if safety features are high on your priority list, go with the HL. Either way, I don't think you can go wrong.
    .
    One more thing, how are the dealer's in your area? I'd prefer to take my business to the place that is more likely to make it a pleasant buying experience and has a good rep in the service dept.
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    I have read the posts. I don't agree with your assessment. Plenty of people had the problem resolved. Maybe they had a better mechanic do the work. The majority of CR-V owners don't have this problem. Enjoy your Vue.
  • jimcojimco Posts: 7
    Is there a reason you aren't comparing the CR-V to the Rav4? Although the comparison then tilts the other direction. The Rav4 is about 300 lbs lighter than the CR-V and slightly smaller overall.


    I also considered the RAV4 but have pretty much ruled it out. It does drive nicely but it's very small inside and the insurance would be $120/yr more on it. The insurance on the CR-V and Highlander are almost the same.
  • jimcojimco Posts: 7
    I don't know what the highlander has standard, so you may well be correct in stating it has more safety features, but the CR-V has side-curtain airbags, front and rear, as standard equipment.

    You're right. Those are safety features that the Highlander doesn't have. I was thinkng of the steering safety features but didn't make that clear in my post.

    Thanks for the insight.
  • jimcojimco Posts: 7
    One more thing, how are the dealer's in your area? I'd prefer to take my business to the place that is more likely to make it a pleasant buying experience and has a good rep in the service dept.

    We have a Honda Accord now and have taken it to the dealer a couple of times. We have been very happy with their work and their courtesy. I agree that it is an important factor. I don't know anything about the Toyota dealer.
  • saabgirlsaabgirl Posts: 184
    Good problem to have. I drove them both and bought a CR-V EX, partially because of the standard safety features, but also because the CR-V was better equipped for less $$$. Look at the standard features on an EX and then do the "Price this Vehicle," adding the same features to the base Highlander. Also, I like having a rear window that flips up and easily accessible tie downs under the front and rear. A minor point, perhaps, but the Highlander looks to me like an inflated Forester. But either way, you should expect years of trouble-free service.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,035
    Keep in mind as well that at trade it time, a 4 cylinder Highlander would be a tougher unit to trade or sell. People look for the 6 cylinder models.
  • daryll44daryll44 Posts: 306
    That being said, the above comment about the 6 cylinder Highlander being more desireable for potential buyers at resale time....might not be true. If gas stays high or goes even higher, people will actually pay more for the smaller engine. But all of that being said, I agree that the CR-V seems to better hit the sweet spot for size, fuel economy and safety. Highlander is a little bigger and the 4 cylinder ones usually are sparce on options.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Remember that in high altitudes you lose power due to the thin air. If you find the Highlander at all underpowered, it'll only get worse as you climb to higher elevations.

    The only way around that is with turbos, or with a vehicle that has more than enough power for you.

    -juice
  • tamarastertamaraster Posts: 107
    The CR-V for 2005 comes standard with ABS, traction control, stability control, plus all of the airbags - that seems like a lot of safety features to me. (I just bought mine two weeks ago.)

    At safercar.gov, they list the Highlander and CR-V as having the same star ratings for all the types of crashes and rollovers, but they say the CR-V has a 19% chance of rollover in a single-car accident, versus 17% for the Highlander, if that's a big concern.

    I live in Colorado tpp, and probably half of my first 1000 miles of driving was in the mountains. We took four people and a day's worth of stuff up through Rocky Mt Natl Park and over Berthoud Pass a couple of times and I didn't find the car underpowered for those trips at all. (It seems very similar in power to my turbo Passat, with perhaps a bit more pick-up at low speeds and a bit less when cruising on the highway.)
  • usnycususnycus Posts: 28
    Any experience with CRV, driving in snow/rain?

    Good/Bad/????
  • drive62,

    Maybe the actual info from Honda Manufacturer will help enlighten you. The drift or PTTR is not related to a tire rotation problem or alignment problem for '05 CRVs. Try this link: http://www.alldata.com/tsb/Honda/1114758000000_1115622000000_05-022/221.html

    The NHTSA website also contains PTTR complaints indicating tire rotation and alignment did not solve the problem. I do not believe I ever indicated that all '05 CRVs have the problem. So far so good with the Vue, thanks for the good wishes. Steve
  • theracoontheracoon Posts: 666
    Any experience with CRV, driving in snow/rain?

    Do you mean the RT4WD versions? Or the FWD version?

    Yes, the RT4WD works wonderfully in snow and ice. I've lived with my '99 CR-V EX for 3 years in Rochester, NY (heavier snow falls) and 3 years in Indianapolis, IN (less snow, but colder temps) and I haven't had any problems.

    The RT4WD also performs well in wet conditions. Just remember that the RT4WD doesn't make you invicible. You still have to drive cautiously in poor driving conditions. I'm always amazed at the number of mid to large SUVs in the ditch after the first snow fall of the year. non-car smiley

    My CR-V came with BFG Touring T/As which lasted about 40,000 miles. I'm currently running Yokohama Avid Touring tires (in the stock size). I do not run snow tires in the winter.
  • fredddfreddd Posts: 14
    Hi everyone, just thought some might find my impressions of interest.

    In no particular order:

    Milage so far, mix of highway @80 mph, country roads, some city is 24.21449 -- this includes a lot of semi-jackrabbit starts.

    5 speed auto seems great - rpm's @80 mph = 2600, not bad at all. Power seems to me to be totally sufficient. My other car is a saab turbo, it's faster, but not by a whole lot. Just like the saab 4 cylinder, you can't be afraid to be heavy with the gas pedal -- responds very well, very nice surprise. I don't think this car needs any more power except for towing, but that is not what it's designed for.

    Haven't had a chance to really try the realtime 4wd. But I have driven it around a farm a little - so far so good.

    All the noise people always talk about is the tires. They are all-season tires, they make noise, big deal. Engine noise is what it is -- it revs fairly high, personally I like it. Sunroof is too noisy above 60 mph.

    Twice I have had a carseat and two adults in the back seat, both times the passengers commented on how much bigger it was than they expected it to be. First time both adults had shoulder belts on, no problem.

    Not sure I like the seats. A few years ago I had a civic (1998) which had terrific seats. What I liked most was that the engineers scooped out a section of the door armrest where my left knee fit perfectly and very comfortably, wish the CR-V did this. Also, maybe it's because my saab has very, very good seats, but the seats seem too short - no thigh support. The back seats have really too much leg room, it actually seems excessive, so why not make the front seats a little longer? Still, after a 2.5 hour drive I had absolutely no stiffness or pain, very orthopedic, just not real "comfy".

    The auto shifter - 4 times now I have, when trying to put the car in gear, put the windshield washer on instead. On the last occasion I did so while talking to someone standing at the driver winder, thereby spraying them with washer fluid - embarrasing. However, the walkthrough is genius in a car this small (although it really isn't that small -- it has more cargo room than a jeep grand cherokee!). With a 2 year old I LOVE the walkthrough.

    Parking break is not awkward at all, very easy to use, I don't understand that complaint.

    Handles nicely, no fear of rollover. Good brakes.

    That's all I can think of right now, I may add more later. Hope someone finds this useful or interesting.
  • tamarastertamaraster Posts: 107
    I've had mine about 1000 miles too (also 2005 EX auto). It is noisier and bumpier than my turbo Pasat wagon was, but MUCH quicker and more powerful. (It's not like I didn't expect more noise and bumpiness.)

    I agree with most of the comments above. I have short legs, so the seat length doesn't bother me. I'm glad that, unlike with my Civic of a few years ago, the seat goes straight enough for me (in that Civic, I always had more recline than I wanted - I like a really straight seat back when I'm driving).

    I also agree on the parking brake convenience. I would add that not only is the pass-through potentially good for that purpose, but it means a TON of storage space there between the seats for bags, purses, etc., for both front and rear passengers (no hump between the seats helps). I love that.

    I also like the little pseudo-tire-well that lets me keep all of my basic car supplies (extra oil, flashlight, paper towels, etc.) from rattling around all over the cargo space.

    And we can put both of our bikes in the back with the 60 side of the 60/40 split down as long as we take the front wheels off, so that's very useful too.
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