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VOLVO P1800

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Comments

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,781
    Well, I know they have their fans but I don't really care much for them. They just seem to ALWAYS have some nagging problem. Check engine light on, electrical glitches, head gaskets and brakes that usually require new rotors along with new pads.

    And very expensive to repair.

    My PV 544's on the other hand were rock tough and simple.

    But that was a long time ago...
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    I know what you mean...they are like Saabs....some very commendable traits, but they just nickel and dime you to death.

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  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    I've had my '93 Volvo 850 for over four years now and not a thing has ever gone wrong on it. I do routine maintenance religiously and that's it. Same thing goes for my golf pro's two '96 850s. He owns identical Volvos that are both blue, and also, nothing major's ever gone wrong with either of them; I know, since I run into them quite often. The GLT sedan he bought new now has 123k on it; the base wagon was bought used in '00 with 61k and it now has 126k on it. That wagon is used by his wife, who has a 150-mile commute to work round-trip.
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    If she put 65k miles on that Volvo in less than two years, the car has got to have a lot of wear and tear now, right? My hunch is that many of the parts are ready for replacement now.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    Well, you know, it's all statistical. I have friends who have had miserable times with their 850s, stories that could make you weep.

    I'm sure your diligence contributes to your success with this car.

    Another factor is that the newer the 850, the better it is. The car has benefitted from improvement and development. If you check consumer guides for the earlier ones, you will see reports of auto trans failure, and many, many complaints of electrical problems and body hardware. Right around 1997 or so, things get much better on the charts.

    What I guess I meant by "nickel and dime" is that the 850 is not a car I would personally expect to be totally trouble-free once out of warranty. I would expect it to, well, nickel and dime me, that is, no major component failure, but always something to attend to.

    It would be interesting to examine that 126K wagon and see how many things I could find wrong with it that do not affect the day to day running of the car.

    Some people's idea of "no problems" are different than mine maybe?

    But anyway, glad to hear you are having good luck with yours.

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  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,781
    We are scared to death of them! We have taken in several *nice* trade in Volvos. They look and run well.

    When we inspect them we find they are not as they appear. Since we really don't work on Volvos, we farm them out to the local dealer.

    The last "creampuff" needed a head gasket (not uncommon) and a bunch of electrical glitches fixed. We lost a ton of money on that one.

    Now, we usually just wholesale them before something breaks.

    Saabs are worse...much worse.

    Not picking on Volvos, I just don't think much of them.
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    And just exactly what year was that last "creampuff" Volvo you received, exactly? Mine's a '93 and nothing ever goes wrong with this one at all. In fact, it's being stored in my father's garage for the winter; car's been there since Dec. 1. What kind of electrical glitches did you have with that particular Volvo, though? I'm really interested to hear what you have to say.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    My friend who owns a Misubishi dealership feels the same way about the 850 (he's a Norwegian who worked for Saab, so he's not a volvo hater by any means). He is very wary of them, especially 1995 and older. I agree, Saabs are much worse.

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  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    I agree 100%: Saabs are definitely worse than Volvos, quality- and reliability-wise. To this day, I will not go near one because I considered all of them risky buys long ago. I'm a native of Vermont, still living here, and I know hundreds of people in the state who own Saabs; we're basically Saab country up here. And believe me, just about every one of them has told me the same story: problem after problem after problem, with the same sky-high repair costs. Many of my close friends in my high school class had Saabs, mostly older 900s from the 80s, and they all had costly problems with them, ranging from constant brake repairs to faulty starters. They were always spending money on their cars at least every other week. On the other hand, I never spend a nickel on my '87 Chevy Nova (Toyota), except to have the oil changed twice.

    I vividly remember one of my father's coworkers owning a '74 Sonett III coupe when I was a toddler. And yes, that Sonett was unreliable, hard to get parts for, and a money trap in terms of repairs. Their boss's '86 9000 Turbo: the same way as that Sonett. Money trap, chronic breakdowns, tons of electrical glitches, even when it was brand-new. Needless to say, these cars were dumped by around 1989. My dad still had his old '78 Toyota Celica around that time (and he bought it brand-new!).
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,781
    Well, I'm glad that you have a troublefree Volvo. I'm sure a lot of owners share your luck.

    The Volvo I was thinking about was around a 93-95, hard to tell (for me)since they all look alike :)

    I remember the check engine light was on (as usual with a Volvo)and the air bag light too.

    Something with the sunroof too, and the brakes.

    If it was just this isolated Volvo, that would be one thing but it just seems (to me anyway)that this is pretty typical.

    But don't mind me, I don't like anything Volkswagen either for the same reasons.
  • lancerfixerlancerfixer Posts: 1,308
    Be sure your service guys are not confusing the "check engine" light with the "Service" light...most people I've talked to do this. The "Service" light is like the little green indicator on Hondas...it comes on at 5,000 mile intervals to remind when it's time for an oil change. To reset it, pull out the little rubber plug on the instrument panel next to the odometer and push the little button behind it with a pen. You may want to let your non-Volvo-savvy techs know this. I discovered it when I was on my year-long search last year for my current 740...many (non Volvo) dealers didn't even know what the "Service" light was for (most of the cars I looked at had the light illuminated...figuring there can't be THAT MANY Volvos with a "check engine" light set, I did a little research.)
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,781
    Good point, but, no...this was a Check Engine light. Some component had failed.

    I dunno...maybe we just get the edgy ones.
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    Mr. Irv Gordon has 1,972,000 miles on his '66 P1800 as of last week.
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    From some guys on Brickboard.com.
  • speedshiftspeedshift Posts: 1,598
    I wonder if his doors fly open when he crosses railroad tracks.
  • lancerfixerlancerfixer Posts: 1,308
    Their "Classic C/D" this week was focused on the P1800, and whose particular car should they feature but Mr. Irv Gordon's. It's clear he's done a LOT of work to the car (the engine compartment looked nicer than any factory job, and the body looked brand new) but still, you've got to be impressed with someone so dedicated to their vehicle.
  • speedshiftspeedshift Posts: 1,598
    Impressed with or afraid of?

    I have to wonder how a car drives that's exceeded its estimated useful life by about nineteen times. I know the mechanicals have been replaced but unless he's got a full roll cage and frame bracing, that body has got to be clapped out. What about things like spindles, A-arms and axles? It would be interesting to magnaflux the entire car.
  • carnut4carnut4 Posts: 574
    on the P1800. Makes me think of a friend of mine who has his own business, working on mostly German cars-{Mercedes, BMW, Porsche]. Most of his customers spend piles of money on their cars, which is why he's done so well [incredibly well!] compared to others I know who run repair shops. Anyway, one of his customers has a P1800-I believe the sport wagon-and once I was in there and commented on how immaculate the car was, and how even the undercarriage looked new. Well, I was told that virtually EVERYTHING had been replaced at least once, and a new rearend/axle had just been installed, and that's why it looked so new. My friend pulled out the file on that car and showed it to me-it was about 2 inches thick with receipts! I guess some people have unlimited money to spend on their cars, and they want them immaculate, no matter what. Doesn't matter what the cars worth, etc. Anyway, seeing that P1800 today on Car & Driver made me think of this other P1800 I know. If you're a mechanic with your own business, that's what you want-a repeat customer with lots of money to spend on bolt in parts to keep the car perfect.
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    The P1800 can be fun to drive, its performance is not very inspiring and sometimes can be yawn-inducing. I know, because my 850 can blow the doors off any year of P1800.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    "Fun" is stretching it, but if you can get it to go fast enough, you can scare yourself and that is sortta fun. There is truth to the old saying that it is more fun to drive a slow car fast than a fast car slow.

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  • speedshiftspeedshift Posts: 1,598
    I don't know if that's always true. I'm thinking of a '61 Falcon I had...
  • carnut4carnut4 Posts: 574
    of the 57 Volvo 444 I had briefly, with the loose steering gear. Yeah, the engine sounded willing enough, but oh, those brakes!
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    Well, you know, old drum brakes, and not very big ones at that. But a 544 is more fun to drive than a P1800 in my opinion, because the P1800 driving position is so bad and the nose is so heavy.

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  • carnut4carnut4 Posts: 574
    I saw at my friend's business. You sat right on the floor, and felt like you weren't high enough to see that well. Very awkward feeling. I really wondered why the guy would spend so much money on that car.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    Ah, you could ask that of so many people with so many cars.

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  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    According to one reputable web site, Mr. Irv Gordon was up to 1,998,200 miles on his '66 P1800 as of Feb. 10. Now isn't that something? A soon-to-be 2 million mile car.
  • speedshiftspeedshift Posts: 1,598
    Does it still move under its own power or is Irv pushing it?
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    I don't know.
  • jrosasmcjrosasmc Posts: 1,704
    And I honestly don't know if Irv's car can go another 100k miles or so. It ought to have been retired!
  • amazonamazon Posts: 293
    I know this is expensive, but this supercharger kit would be awesome in a 544, wouldn't it?

    http://www.v-performance.com
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