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Dodge Intrepid

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  • have a 97 interpid driving home it just died and would not start, cranks over good I have no spark from the coil pack
    did the coild pack go bad or is there something lurking in the dark shadows
  • My intrepid is doing the same thing as yours was. Does not seem to be able to hold a charge on the battery. I have replaced the battery but have had to still jump it several times. Did replacing the alternator fix your problem?
  • smithedsmithed Posts: 444
    The fact that there are so may problems in so many different systems makes me think it in the central computer. Have you had it checked out. With Chrysler cars up until more recent ones, it was possible to get the computer codes by turning the ignition key on and off three times without starting the car. I do not know if the 1995s could still do that. It might be a place to start. The website Allpar.com can probably help head you in the right direction. :shades:
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    but I think only K-cars and their many derivatives could give you the computer codes by turning the ignition key on-off three times. I had an '88 LeBaron that would do that. Once you turned it on-off-on-off-on-off, the check engine light would flash in a sequence. Each code was two digits, and "55" was end of codes.

    So if you had, say, a code 37, the light would flash 3 times, pause, flash 7 times, pause again, then flash 5 times, pause, and then 5 more times, and then it was done. And then you had to go find out what code 37 meant, although nowadays that's not so hard with the internet.

    However, I had an '89 Plymouth Gran Fury that did not have this feature. The L-cars (Omni, Horizon, TC-3, etc) might have done it though.

    Does the '95 Intrepid have OBD-II? If so, there are any number of engine code readers you can buy to read the codes yourself. One of my buddies bought one a couple years ago to use on his '98 Tracker. We've also used it on my uncle's '03 Corolla.
  • smithedsmithed Posts: 444
    I don't know whether the '95 Intrepid used OBDII, but I do know that the folks at the local Autozone will use theirs on your car for free to help you diagnose a problem (and so that you'll buy parts from them :shades:)

    My 1985 Omni GLH Turbo would demonstrate the codes with the ignition key trick. Used it many times and replaced oxygen sensors as a result of those codes.

    Enjoy
  • On the newer Dodges, you turn the ingition key to acc position while at the same time pressing the trip odomenter. That will pull up all your codes in an easy to read manner.
  • the only reason for the sludge issue is smaller heads, as long as the oil is changed at 3k miles, no problems at all. I work for a Dodge deaerlship in sales and I have seen many 2.7's traded in with well over 150k on them, and these folks always want new Intrepids, and when I tell then they do not make them anymore, they are not happy, saying the Intrepid is the best car they have ever had!!! I have an 02 2.7, 63K miles, all I do is oil changes, and its perfect
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    I dropped off a bunch of old clothes at the local GoodWill store to donate. The guy handling it asked me about my Intrepid, which I thought was kinda interesting, considering that it's not really a car that encourages total strangers to strike up a conversation!

    Anyway, turns out this guy's a Mopar fan and once owned a 1994 Intrepid, and around the 200,000 mile mark bought a 2003 Neon and gave the Trep to his son. I dunno how many miles it has on it now though, or if he still has it. This guy also has a 4-cyl Dakota, around a 1995 or so, and it's over the 200K mile mark as well.
  • I just bought a 1996/97 dodge Intrepid es (it was a 1197 model that came out in 1996). i bought it for 2,800 for a private seller and it had 100,050 miles on it. now it has 100,780 in just 2 months. i love this car as its fast and fun to drive. its an automatic but when i speed up sometimes i can feel it hesitate and also it smokes alot out of the back. also i was told i need a new timing belt soon. anyone know why these things are happening and where i can find a good quality timing belt for a cheap price? thanks Tony
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    is probably only going to be something like $30-50. If that. It's the labor to put it on that'll be the expensive part. I have no idea how much that would be nowadays. Also, it's usually best to change the water pump when you're in there.

    If it's hesitating, it might just need a good tuneup. As for the smoke, it depends on what kind of smoke you're seeing. If it's blueish-black, then you're burning oil. If it's white, and has a sweet smell to it, then coolant is getting into the combustion chamber somehow. Usually that's a sign of a bad head gasket or warped head, but it could also be a bad intake manifold.

    If the smoke is just kind of grayish, or you can really only see it at night in the headlights of the other cars behind you as you accelerate, that usually means you need a tuneup, and the gasoline isn't burning as completely as it should.

    I forget what black smoke means, though. Running too lean, maybe?
  • I had that problem with my 97 Intrepid. The funny part was it was after I replaced my coil pack, the car just died on me on the expressway. My problem was fixed when I put the old one back in and changed the spark plugs & wires.
    Still it may be something you are missing.
  • Jason5Jason5 Posts: 440
    Thanks for all those who chimed in and commented on "autobeefs" assertions about my sludge comment from...uh...2004. You are correct in observing that the so called "sludge problem" is observed across all makes and models. To that end, like "unintended acceleration", it has been largely recognized as more to do with the driver (poor maintenance) and driving habits than design flaws.

    On another note, my 2000 ES is doing well though the "repair bug" just bit me in earnest. At a rousing 133,500 I had to have my radiator replaced because it had cracked and couldn't be repaired. Other than that....going strong!
  • My check engine light came back on on thursday second time since i bought car in january, it got 100,750 but its making me mad that it keeps having problems. i took it to auto zone and they sad i had 1 misfiring cylinder. it said 1 out of 4 but i have 6 cylinders so i think auto zone is wrong. if its like that then i have to have all my spark plugs changed and my wire changes. now i have to push the timing belt and if i run it to long it might die and then my engine will die. :mad: this is frsuturating. i hope this car was worth the 2,800 i paid for it :mad: :mad:
  • mary_mmary_m Posts: 3
    Well I am at my wits ends over my 1996 3.5liter Intrepid :mad: . It has been nothing but a curse from a replacement engine in 2000, a new transmission in 2001, and other various parts since then.
    But the straw that broke my back was in Nov.2005 when twice in two weeks all the gages were going haywire (at a standstill I was supposedly going 50kms, the RPM gage was saying it was revving at 5500rpms, etc.....)then *BOOM* temp gage went sky high then that lovely smell and outdoor cloudy mist of coolant. *AARRGGHH*
    We limped home with the :lemon: as I am now apt to call the beast, got a new thermostat (which was now stuck open), put in a new water pump, got a new battery and now the *BIG STRING OF EXPLETIVES DELETED* will not even turn over :mad: :mad: :mad:
    I am one pissed off Canadian chick that use to love her big beast but I don't know what else to do to her and my money is long gone as I am a mother of two kids under the age of three so money is always tight!!!! *SIGH*
  • Jason5Jason5 Posts: 440
    Any of the old timers seeing a pattern here?
  • mary_mmary_m Posts: 3
    Heh that the intrepids have a "HUGE PROBLEM :P ;) ........look at the class action lawsuit taking place in the states against Daimler Chrysler!!! :lemon:
  • mary_mmary_m Posts: 3
    I know that for my '96 :lemon: you turn the key 7 times.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    with my mechanic the other day, about the 2.7 and sludge, and learned something that may put some of our fears to rest. And also reinforce what others have been saying.

    Yes, he said the engine will sludge up, and yes, it costs about $5,000 plus labor to put a used 2.7 in. HOWEVER, in order to get it to sludge up, you have to consistently let it go 7-10,000 miles between oil changes! I think my all-time worst is 5,000 miles, although this last time was about 4600 miles.
  • fred222fred222 Posts: 200
    My check engine light came back on on thursday second time since i bought car in january, it got 100,750 but its making me mad that it keeps having problems. i took it to auto zone and they sad i had 1 misfiring cylinder. it said 1 out of 4 but i have 6 cylinders so i think auto zone is wrong. if its like that then i have to have all my spark plugs changed and my wire changes. now i have to push the timing belt and if i run it to long it might die and then my engine will die. this is frsuturating. i hope this car was worth the 2,800 i paid for it
    You don't say what year your car is, but most cars these days require a major tune up and timing belt replacement at around 100,000 miles. This is why many people un-load cars just under 100,000 miles. This maintenance is something that you should price into the cost of a car approaching 100,000 miles.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    requires a timing belt replacement around 100-105,000 miles, but other than that, I don't think the car should really need much. Maybe new spark plugs and a coolant flush. I'm not sure what the interval is for the serpentine/accessory belts on the older 3.5, but on the newer Intrepids it's every 60,000 miles. I think the service interval for the tranny is 100,000 miles on the "regular" schedule and 50,000 miles on the "severe" schedule (which is probably why so many trannies fail). I just do mine every 30,000 miles to be safe.

    At some point the car's going to need a new air filter and pcv valve, but those are at much more regular intervals...more like when they get dirty as opposed to a set schedule.

    FWIW, when my 2000 2.7 hit 100,000 miles, it didn't need much. I had put new front pads and rotors on around the 98,000 mile mark. Had the coolant changed around the 85,000 mile mark. The mechanic said that even with the long-life coolant, you're better off changing it early. While the older green coolant simply loses its ability to resist freezing, and its ability to cool, and its ability to resist rusting once it's past its prime, supposedly the newer pink/orange stuff will actually start damaging the cooling system much more aggressively. I had the belts changed at 85,000 miles, too. That was when I discovered the owner's manual called for 60,000. Oops. :blush:

    I did have to have new rear pads put on around 102,000 miles. And I put in a new battery around 105,000 miles, just as a precaution. Spark plugs had been changed way back at 51,000 miles, but possibly prematurely. Tranny was last serviced at 90,000 miles. Last set of tires put on around 77,000 miles.

    I'm now at 114,700 miles. The next thing I'll probably have to worry about is the tranny servicing again, at 120K. Might also do the spark plugs then too. As for the coolant, well the mechanic said that the hoses themselves should be fine until the next change, which he suggested I do around 150,000 miles. But I might just have the mechanic check that out around 120,000 too, just to be safe.

    Still, maintenance probably is why people unload their cars right around 100,000 miles. Especially cars with timing belts. And instead of doing things as they become needed, I'm sure many people just put them off, with plans of doing them all at once, but then sell the car before actually having it done. I don't know if it's true so much anymore, but the 100K mile mark used to just be a stigma. Used car lots didn't want to touch anything with that many miles on it. And people used to just think that by 100K a car was dead and buried, even if it really had plenty of life left in it. A lot of it probably comes from the old days when cars only had a 5-digit odometer. Plus, with the way cars used to rust, and the sloppy tolerances back then, many cars would be reduced to junk by 100,000 miles if you didn't take care of them.
  • fred222fred222 Posts: 200
    Good to see an Intrepid with few problems. I am in a similar position, but with fewer miles. My 1999 Intrepid ES is coming up on 69,000 miles. I did some work to it about a year ago. Replaced the serpentine belt because it was ticking. Replaced the pads and rotors due to warped rotors. Had an engine miss which cleared up with replacement spark plugs. The only non routine maintenance work was a bad front wheel bearing and a bad trans sensor replacement. I purchased this car 6 1/2 years ago and I still smile every time that I drive it. It is quieter than my wife's Pacifica and quicker and gets great gas mileage.
  • Jason5Jason5 Posts: 440
    Actually...um...."mary m"..the problem to which I was referring is a pattern many old timers will recognize. Members--with suspiciously "new" profiles--throwing out barbed comments with surprisingly little knowledge.

    Andre'--I'm having my tranny serviced again at 150,000 which should be about mid summer at the rate I accrue miles. Interestingly--and yet again flying in the face of many so called "complaints"--my transmission has never required one iota of unscheduled maintenance. Even after 133,000 miles of rigorous use.
  • tkfitztkfitz Posts: 95
    Has anyone changed the serpentine belts on their Intrepid themselves? I have a 2000 with the 2.7 and am wondering how to release tension on the alternator/power steering belt. The ac belt has a spring tensioner. It must be something simple, but there is not much room to
    look and I am hoping someone can save me some time. Thanks in advance.....
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    I pondered the idea of changing my own belts. Until I looked under the hood and saw how little clearance there was. I knew that I'd get enough bruises and bloody knuckles, and would probably get mad enough that I'd end up messing something up, so I just bit the bullet and paid to have them changed! :sick:
  • tkfitztkfitz Posts: 95
    I did the @&%$@#*@$ battery. I will do the belts. I really cannot see how much worse they could be. It is just that I hate doing things for the first time on one of my own cars. Especially without a manual. So much easier to do maint. on the older cars.
    My one complaint with this car is some of the maint. items could have been designed better. But oil changes are a snap.
    Thanks for the reply.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    don't get me started on the battery! I changed mine back in May of last year. I didn't get my knuckles TOO bruised and bloody, but I did swear to myself that I would trade or sell this car before it was time for ANOTHER battery change! :mad: Or, I'll just wuss out and pay the mechanic to do it. :blush:

    And yeah, oil changes are a breeze on the Intrepid. I just park it at the edge of the driveway where the ground slopes off, and can get up under it without even jacking the car up.
  • fred222fred222 Posts: 200
    I pondered the idea of changing my own belts. Until I looked under the hood and saw how little clearance there was. I knew that I'd get enough bruises and bloody knuckles, and would probably get mad enough that I'd end up messing something up, so I just bit the bullet and paid to have them changed!
    I changed the serpentine belt on my 1999 Intrepid ES (3.2L). I have done lots of work on cars and this was a real pain in the a**. I cannot believe that Chrysler does not use a self adjusting tensioner on these cars. You must adjust the tension from an almost totally inaccessible location. I felt that I had really achieved something when I was finished, but wished that I did not have to. I have changed serpentine belts on a 1995 Suburban which was very easy and on a 1992 Grand Caravan, which was just easy. The Intrepid was not even in the same ball park.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,026
    that I can remember changing the belts on were a 1985 Silverado and a 1979 New Yorker. The Silverado wasn't too bad, although it has 4 belts and figuring out the procedure to get the old ones off and the new ones on was kinda like a jigsaw puzzle. At least there's plenty of room to maneuver around though!

    The NYer was actually really easy. Only three belts, and two of them follow the same route. IIRC, the power steering pump was on the one-belt loop, while the a/c and alternator were on the two-belt loop.

    I guess the serpentine belts have their advantages in (usually) lasting longer, and only having to replace one belt. But they sure make up for it in aggravation! :mad:
  • fred222fred222 Posts: 200
    I guess the serpentine belts have their advantages in (usually) lasting longer, and only having to replace one belt. But they sure make up for it in aggravation!
    A well designed serpentine belt can probably be changed in 5 minutes or less, and with an automatic belt tensioner, there is no adjusting. The Suburban was easier because the belt was right in the front and there was lots of room. On the Caravan it is on the side and not quite as accessible and you really need a special tool to do it easily.
  • hayneldanhayneldan Posts: 657
    I changed the serpentine belt on a 96 Grand Caravan with no special tools, only an open end wrench to take the tension off of the automatic tensioner, and a coat hanger bent to help guide the belt over the lower pulleys. From the top no less.
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