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BMW 5-Series Sedans

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  • erickplerickpl Posts: 2,735
    If you always wait for the new body style, you'll always be waiting... :D

    As for the E60, it came out in 03 or 04 and BMW generally has a 7 year cycle. The changes for the 08 5 Series are quite nice and actually with the minor exterior and rather subtle changes in the interior (like the doors), it is my favorite incarnation of the E60 yet. If you like the E60's styling, go for it. I have not seen any shots of the next 5 Series (the one the replaces the E60), so it may be hideous or may be totally radical.

    -Paul
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 30,571
    Yeah... what he says...

    Plus, the new model in 2009? I think that is Fall, 2009 as a 2010 model..

    So, if you wait for the new model, it may be awhile.. :)

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  • sdg380sdg380 Posts: 109
    Here's a link to a spy shot of the next 5-series (try googling "BMW 5-series next generation"), comments I've read suggest somewhat of a retreat from the Bangle styling on the E60 (good or bad depending on your tastes), seems unclear if it will be an '09 or '10, but I'm planning on hanging onto my E39 until then (but it doesn't get driven very much, so no rush for me.) But if you're in the market now, an '10 would put it at least 2 and half years away, you might want to enjoy an E60 in the meantime.

    http://www.worldcarfans.com/spyphotos.cfm/country/gcf/spyphotoID/6061011.002/bmw- /spy-photos-next-gen-2009-bmw-5-series
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    On my way home yesterday I was taking in the sights of an E60 Sport Wagon slowly passing me. While I'm not much of a fan of wagons in general, I do find the wagon version of the E60 to be more attractive than the sedan, and this one was done up in Sapphire Black, making it very good looking in my eyes. Then it got far enough in front of me for me to make out the model designation. "Hmmm, nice." I thought as I read "535xi" off the rear tailgate.

    Best Regards,
    Shipo
  • bruceomegabruceomega Posts: 250
    I found one site when I Googled "BMW 5 series next generation" that was predicting the car would adopt the X5's double wishbone suspension. If so, seems pretty likely they'll convert to RFTs a la the X5.

    Bruce
  • sdg380sdg380 Posts: 109
    Bruce, sorry for my ignorance, I assume RFTs are run flat tires, which from what I've read do not seem so great, apparently really compromise ride quality...can't seem to put my fingers on a link to a comparison I read recently of a 550, E500, and Holden (GM), but the BMW got slammed for the run flats.

    To be honest, I can hardly think of the last flat I've had, and much as I always thought the "full service" spare in a BMW was so "non-compromising", guess I could live just fine with a limited-service spare for an emergency--but I wouldn't want run flats, which you'd drive on (and suffer through?) every single day, in case of the rare eventuality of a flat.

    Ahhh, here's the link to an Aussie site ("bloody run-flats"), they're none too wild about Active Steering either...
    http://editorial.carsales.com.au/car-review/2358840.aspx
  • dhanleydhanley Posts: 1,531
    I had a chance to flog a 530 with the active steering on a track, and frankly, i thought it was pretty good. Opinions vary on this of course. Even some of the track-nut roundel editors like it.

    But you have to get the active roll stabilization. That's what transforms the car.
  • cabluecablue Posts: 48
    Thanks for your input. It's a tough call. Still unsure which way I'll go. The pictures are beautiful! I may try something different, just for a change, until that comes out, possibly an Audi A6 4.2. But nothing drives like a BMW. :)
  • erickplerickpl Posts: 2,735
    I'd agree with that assessment. :)

    -Paul
  • bruceomegabruceomega Posts: 250
    sdg380,

    Yes, I posted the same link to the Aussie road test wondering what people with 5 series experience thought of their comments, but no feedback so far.

    Yes, I was referring to run flat tires for RFTs. I like the safety and convenience advantages they are claimed to offer, but my experience with all season RFTs on an 06 330Xi has not been great. I switched brands (Bridgestone to Continental) and that helped, but I believe the RFTs are the reason the car's ride reaches a compliance limit sooner than I would like.

    From what I have read, the change in the suspension design in the new X5 was made to mitigate the ride issues of RFTs. One road test said it works very well, and I don't recall seeing owners of the new X5 mentioning RFTs as an issue.

    I also got the impression the summer performance run flat tires on the 3 series sedans do not have the same issues, or the same degree of issues, as my all-season RFTs.

    Thanks
    Bruce
  • sdg380sdg380 Posts: 109
    Bruce, I just knew I had seen that Aussie comparison somewhere--doh!

    Guess I'm just not sure what to make of the whole run-flat debate, I can see the safety argument, ie, they help to maintain control in the event of a blow-out, but since I understand that they work by providing extra stiff sidewalls, it would seem that compliance would inevitably be compromised. BTW, haven't I heard about another form of run-flat with an inner support "donut", that supports the tread in the event of failure? Seems like that might permit configuring sidewalls for the desired level of comfort and control.

    As I noted, seems like my "full service" spares on my E34 and E39 have seen very "limited service" (yuk, yuk), so maybe RFT's are where the industry is headed, thus gaining reduced vehicle weight (very important in my book), and improved space efficiency (there is something to be said for decent-sized trunk.) But at this juncture, I think I'd still opt for conventional tires, and some sort of spare.

    Let us know what you decide if you effect procurement of a new 535, Steve G in Chi
  • bruceomegabruceomega Posts: 250
    Steve G,

    I haven't been following RFTs per se except for how they relate to my current car, or a car I may buy in the future.

    "at this juncture, I think I'd still opt for conventional tires, and some sort of spare" -- this is my thought as well.

    Is the other RFT with inner donut by any chance the Michelin offered on the Acura RL? I think that tire requires a unique wheel, which would not be of interest to me.

    Thanks
    Bruce
  • jb_shinjb_shin Posts: 357
    I had a 335i with RFT (non-sport pkg) and it felt and drove fine. It was certainly more compliant than my 03 M5 but still had respectable road holding when I pushed it. I'd have to hold the judgment until I have a chance to drive the sports pkg model, but it was better than I was expecting. It is still telling, though, that M cars do not use RTF.
  • bumpsbumps Posts: 4
    I am a proud owner of an '07 530xi / 6-speed with all the bells and whistles. Previous bimmers were a '98 M3 and an '01 540i sport. Here's the question. Does anyone have a performance comparison between the 530xi and 535xi? I've heard the 535xi pays a weight premium and a somewhat less desirable weight distribution. Although my 530 has adequate low end grunt, I sure miss the midrange power of my older 540i. Any comments?
  • bumpsbumps Posts: 4
    My '07 530xi has the NAV system. Although it's certainly not as good as the one in my Land Cruiser, it does the job. Like all aspects of the I-Drive system, it takes a little getting used to. The screen is relatively small, but directions (and corrections) are quick. Enjoy!
  • bruceomegabruceomega Posts: 250
    Does anyone know which manufacturer's auto transmission comes with the 535Xi, GM or ZF?

    I was glancing through the June 07 issue of Bimmer magazine, and in an article on the 3 series coupes, they said the 328i gets the GM AT while the 335i comes with a ZF AT. Does BMW have to use the ZF to handle the higher power output of the twin turbo engine? According to that article, the ZF has quicker shifts than the GM.

    I was wondering if the pattern in the 3 series coupe carries over to the 5 series; i.e., do the 528 cars get the GM AT while the 535 cars get a ZF?

    Or, is the ZF the optional, special AT offered on the 535i and 550i, but not on the 535Xi? If so, does that mean the 535Xi gets the GM AT?

    Thanks
    Bruce
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,914
    A reporter would like to talk with a consumer who owns a 6-cylinder BMW 5-Series. Please respond to ctalati@edmunds.com no later than May 3, 2007 with your daytime contact information and a brief description of your experience.

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  • bruceomegabruceomega Posts: 250
    FWIW,

    The BMW web site now features the new 5 series at log on, or on periodic log ons. But the 5 series section of their site per se has not been updated- still shows the 525 and 530 cars.

    Bruce
  • mcercmcerc Posts: 1
    looking to purchase a 2001 525i w/MT. I believe traction/stability control is standard. I live in northern new jersey and would like to know if car will be ok driving in the snow
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,705
    I've driven my E 39 (2000 528iA) thru three New Hampshire winters without any problems, I do recommend snows unless you have the luxury of staying home on those few days when the roads are bad in Jersey.

    Properly equipped (snows and TC) E 39s are great snow cars and I should know, I've lived in New Hampshire for 22 years. ;)

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • joyrider147joyrider147 Posts: 69
    Before asking my big question, I need to get this off my chest and just wondering: WHY DO MANY CAR MANUFACTURERS MAKE AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION CARS THAT SUCK, BREAK DOWN QUICKLY, AND BURN GAS RAPIDLY BUT THEY RARELY MAKE NICE STICK SHIFT CARS THAT GO FAST, LAST LONGER, AND ARE MORE FUEL EFFICIENT?

    I was looking at several cars available; a 1993 325is Stick Shift Coupe, a 1995 740i or a 1990 750iL witha v12 and low mileage, and a nice 1994 530i or 540i with an automatic.

    First, I was looking for a BMW with good condition and at a low price but runs great because soo I'm looking to strip the car and rebuild it with some high performance parts. As for my driving needs, I need a car which might have a manual transmission that would react better in a city environment as opposed to an automatic. Don't get me wrong, I can take an automatic as well, but it must shift nicely in stop and go traffic. Also, I need a car which has nice horsepower and get up and go, like a v8 or v12. But, since the car's being used in city driving, I need overall fuel efficiency in a car.

    Let's look at the 325is. It is stick shift, which I might like since I don't like automatics. But overall, what would be good for city and highway driving, as well as Motorsport driving? Auto or stick? Stick has 5 gears which can be selected rapidly at lower RPMs for increased acceleration where as autos have 4 and are slower at shifting with power reduction. The problem is this car has a inline 6 which might have nice power, but may have struggling against cars with 8s or 12s and it might not catch up to an M3. Also, the car is small and agile, which is great for cornering and grip and reduced weight for faster acceleration, but it is only a small 2 door car. And, it weighs just as much as a 5 series or a 7 series and is only limited to a 6.

    Next, the 1994 530i. It has a 3.0 V8 which is a peppy, fuel efficient v8, it is a 4 door sedan with a pretty roomy trunk, and is reminiscent of an M5. The downside is it is an automatic, it is a bit heavier than a 3 series which may reduce acceleration, grip, and cornering. Also, I don't know how good a mini-v8 performs it Motorsporting.

    A 540i stick shift is a M5 knock off, but is very rare, pretty high in price, and are more available in auto than it is in manual.

    Third car is a 1995 740i. Newer model car, but may cost more in parts and probably spend more in replacement parts than high performance upgrades. Heavier car, bigger car for even more reduced acceleration, grip, and cornering. And its an automatic.

    Lastly, a 1990 750iL. Again, v12 excellent for high speed, acceleration is no problem for a v12, extremely roomy interior and trunk, but it is an automatic and a v12 will cost astoundingly more than its 740 counterpart and may still need more parts even after repairs.

    I'm leaning towards the 530i since it has less drawbacks, but should I go for it since 530i stick shifts are rare? Or should I do a tranny swap out and end up with all advantages and no drawbacks? Or should I enjoy it as is?

    Or should I go for a newer model beemer like a '97 528i or a different model e36? I appreciate your response.
  • andys120andys120 Loudon NHPosts: 16,705
    Do your homework Joyrider, the 530i is not a V8, it is a straight six. 530is w stick shifts aren't rare. I suspect you are new to driving or you would understand that no one car is well suited for city and highway driving, as well as "Motorsport" driving?

    You need to examine and explain to us what your priorities are.

    2000 BMW 528i, 2001 BMW 330CiC

  • chile96chile96 Posts: 330
    i second andy' sentiments - you are all over the spectrum with those different cars. and your complaints about a mfr not making cars to your standards are kinda far fetched.....ESPECIALLY for 15 yr old cars!

    either you get a nice cruiser with good gas mileage OR something with a bigger engine with less eficient gas mileage.

    i could go on and on but i'll start at the beginning with the first example.....the 325. you comoplain of it not being able to "catch" an M3??? why would it and why would you expect it to?? and no, this car does not weigh as much as a 5 or 7 series...i'm giving up, nevermind
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 30,571
    That 530i is a V-8..

    The '94 530i and 540i both had the infamous Nikasil engines... Lots of problems with internal engine failure.. Though, one could argue that any car that old would have failed by now, if it had a problem..

    The 750IL is no car for someone on a budget..

    The '93 325is is the only one of those that I'd consider, and even the early E36 models were known to be problematic.

    What is your budget? You should really try to get into '96 and later models.. All of those that you mentioned come with big issues.

    regards,
    kyfdx

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  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    "Do your homework Joyrider, the 530i is not a V8, it is a straight six. 530is w stick shifts aren't rare."

    Sorry dude, but I have to say this, maybe you should be the one to do the homework. ;-) During the mid 1990s, BMW's 530i WAS a V8 and not an I6. To the best of my knowlsdge, the first I6 530i was produced in 2001.

    Best Regards,
    Shipo
  • jb_shinjb_shin Posts: 357
    E34 I-6 model was 535i, and as many pointed out, 530i is a v-8. Most Nikasil issues were addressed with replacement parts and extended warranty, but there may be some out there with original engines.
  • joyrider147joyrider147 Posts: 69
    Has ANYONE PROPERLY READ MY FORUM???? I SAID "Next, the 1994 530i. It has a 3.0 V8 which is a peppy, fuel efficient v8, it is a 4 door sedan with a pretty roomy trunk, and is reminiscent of an M5." I've had my license since I was 18, but driving since I was 15 (I'm now 24.) And, why do you think I'm posting this message; I'm LOOKING FOR PEOPLE WHO ACTUALLY HAVE DRIVING EXPERIENCE WITH THESE SPECIFIC TYPE OF BMWs!

    I'd take a 325is and still enjoy it as an M3 derivative, no problem at all. I'm just considering the advantages or disadvantages from having a dependable, well-developed 2.5 inline 6 as opposed to an efficient 3.0 V8 which might produce a bit more horsepower with less stress on the engine.

    Why do you think I was looking at 530i or 540i? I KNOW 525i and 535i and M5 ALL HAVE Inline 6s!!!

    What I mean for "well suited for city driving" is peppy in low gears and doesn't burn alot of gas, resulting in a lot of carbon buildup which kills the car in a short amount of time.

    As for "highway driving", has a nice amount of punch to accelerate from 40 to 60 MPH in a small amount of time to merge with traffic, and can easily have an overall speed of 75 to 80 without high RPMs or stress to the engine to maintain that speed.

    And what I meant for "Motorsport" driving- Capable of traveling at speeds of 100 plus MPH in high gear with a moderate amount of efficiency and has tight grip to the road for extra traction, but yet feels comfortable on a long, smooth road.

    With my budget, I'm looking for a car in an okay condition and alright mileage with a good price that will last for several months until I chop it apart for a project car and replace various engine and transmission parts. I'm estimating $2,500 to $3,000 for the car, plus $5,000 or $6,500 in parts. Sure, I can get an M3 for that price tag, but either it will have high mileage, need lots of repair, and it doesn't give me the hands on experience with BMW engine and transmission rebuilds, vehicle modifications.
  • richardga73richardga73 Posts: 84
    ok joyrider, I think you scared everyone off the discussion for 2 weeks! Thats got to be a record. Anyway I have a serious question for only those who have drive 5's enough to answer and please no parroting from articles! Ive had a 3 sport,and I'm going to buy a 550 auto. Thought the 3 sport drove just a little rough while I thought the stock 3 was sporty enough but dont like seats. Now I am told that the 5 sport doesnt ride as rough due to the increased weight(inertia and all being harder to bounce around)Dont want stock seats love sport seats with big bolsters. Do you think it is possible 5sport will possibly ride like 3 non sport?
  • bruceomegabruceomega Posts: 250
    richardqa73,

    I can't comment on the ride question, but according to the BMW 2008 5 series brochure, the optional seats are called multi-contour seats, with 20 way adjustment. They're not referred to as sport seats.

    You can order the multi-contour seats separately, without the sport package. Or, they're included if you order the sport package.

    I just ordered a 535Xi, and opted for the multi-contour seats after a "test sitting" on the showroom floor where the salesman ran through all the adjustments available. I liked them much better than the sport seats in my '06 3 series.

    Bruce
  • ping2ping2 Posts: 6
    I am looking at a '08 535 with sport package. Love the look and feel of this car (Steering ,head rests - seats, rims etc.). I am new to BMW's and have heard of horror stories of the run flats, especially on the low profiles ( mostly concerning the 330's). I have read that they are running into problems under 10k. Is this a general issue or specific to some of the 3 series?
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