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Edmunds Members - Cars and Conversations

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  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,289

    stickguy said:

    Since I have time on my hands these days, I was wondering if any car dealerships allow sales people to work part time? @roadburner, do you know? @isellhondas Craig, do you know?

    I wouldn't want to work the crazy retail hours. Maybe 2 to 3 days/week.

    probably hard in a dealership. plus they want nights and weekends. My thought for when I am in your situation (assuming I get there before I am 80!) is a high end used car place. something that sells Porsche, etc. probably a lot more internet and less volume, but less pressure. do a lot of work from home.
    The trouble is that those upscale store usually hire experienced salespeople. A newbie probably will only hired by low end places and be out in the rain smoking cigarettes and waiting for ups. I’ve delivered to some of those high pressure stores and it’s not pretty.
    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • jipsterjipster Louisville, KentuckyPosts: 6,018
    edited June 7

    Well, you gave them a chance and they didn't bite. Fair enough. When they called back I would have said. " You have my offer...all I need is a yes or a no. I do not want to go back to negotiate. I need to buy a car now so my offer is good for the next two days"

    Also, a lot of Sales Managers don't like a take it or leave it offer from a customers who has his arms folded and his heels dug into the ground and they will respond by doing the same thing. Had you said that you were willing to go another 200.00 he may have softened his posture...maybe not. In any event, I suspect that you weren't all that excited about the car.

    I think you’re right. They perceived me as dug in. They (the Sales Manager) did the same as a result. And, probably a hundred or two may have made the deal. But, I put my best offer out there, and they didn’t bite. So, to sell, to me, on that given day, it wasn’t going to happen. I was dug in, and so were they.

    As luck would have it, I bought the Cobra Convertible a couple of weeks later. Clearly I was in buying mode.
    I thought of you today when I bought my son a 2010 Ford Fusion SEL with sunroof, leather, heated seats etc. 29k miles. They wanted $8900, I said $8150. I got some push back along the lines of “we got too much into it” and “we can’t cut it that much”. I told them that they could take my offer or not but we’d still be friends either way. Finally they agreed. We pick it up on Tuesday.


    Looks like we have a "Dad's Who Bought Their Son a 2010 Ford Fusion, or It's Equivalent, Club", oldfarmer. Car and Drivers car of the year in 2010. Nice find and buy. It really is a very nice car to drive.
    2020 Honda Accord EX-L, 2011 Hyundai Veracruz, 2010 Mercury Milan Premiere, 2008 Mercury Mariner, 2007 Kia Optima
  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079

    jipster said:

    Well, you gave them a chance and they didn't bite. Fair enough. When they called back I would have said. " You have my offer...all I need is a yes or a no. I do not want to go back to negotiate. I need to buy a car now so my offer is good for the next two days"

    Also, a lot of Sales Managers don't like a take it or leave it offer from a customers who has his arms folded and his heels dug into the ground and they will respond by doing the same thing. Had you said that you were willing to go another 200.00 he may have softened his posture...maybe not. In any event, I suspect that you weren't all that excited about the car.

    I think you’re right. They perceived me as dug in. They (the Sales Manager) did the same as a result. And, probably a hundred or two may have made the deal. But, I put my best offer out there, and they didn’t bite. So, to sell, to me, on that given day, it wasn’t going to happen. I was dug in, and so were they.

    As luck would have it, I bought the Cobra Convertible a couple of weeks later. Clearly I was in buying mode.
    I thought of you today when I bought my son a 2010 Ford Fusion SEL with sunroof, leather, heated seats etc. 29k miles. They wanted $8900, I said $8150. I got some push back along the lines of “we got too much into it” and “we can’t cut it that much”. I told them that they could take my offer or not but we’d still be friends either way. Finally they agreed. We pick it up on Tuesday.


    Looks like we have a "Dad's Who Bought Their Son a 2010 Ford Fusion, or It's Equivalent, Club", oldfarmer. Car and Drivers car of the year in 2010. Nice find and buy. It really is a very nice car to drive.
    Thanks, yeah, I ran out of cars that I could justify buying for myself so now I dragged my kid into this. It satisfied all my car fetishes: super low mileage, Florida car (no rust) at $500 below Edmunds TMV.

    It was like waving a bag of dope in front of a strung out junkie.
    Car looks really good....but that dealer should install a new tile floor :p

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079

    stickguy said:

    Since I have time on my hands these days, I was wondering if any car dealerships allow sales people to work part time? @roadburner, do you know? @isellhondas Craig, do you know?

    I wouldn't want to work the crazy retail hours. Maybe 2 to 3 days/week.

    probably hard in a dealership. plus they want nights and weekends. My thought for when I am in your situation (assuming I get there before I am 80!) is a high end used car place. something that sells Porsche, etc. probably a lot more internet and less volume, but less pressure. do a lot of work from home.
    The trouble is that those upscale store usually hire experienced salespeople. A newbie probably will only hired by low end places and be out in the rain smoking cigarettes and waiting for ups. I’ve delivered to some of those high pressure stores and it’s not pretty.
    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.
    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 37,648
    I believe in having more money, so covered there!

    2019 Acura TLX A-spec 4 cyl. (mine), and 2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD (wife's)

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,289
    edited June 7
    jipster said:


    Looks like we have a "Dad's Who Bought Their Son a 2010 Ford Fusion, or It's Equivalent, Club", oldfarmer. Car and Drivers car of the year in 2010. Nice find and buy. It really is a very nice car to drive.

    Car and Driver does not have a “Car of the Year” award- that is a PR stunt conducted by Motor Trend. Car and Driver has a “10 Best List,” and in 2010 a Fusion Hybrid was on that list.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,289
    driver100 said:



    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.

    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)
    You couldn’t pay me enough to push soul-slaughtering appliances to payment buyers.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • jipsterjipster Louisville, KentuckyPosts: 6,018

    jipster said:


    Looks like we have a "Dad's Who Bought Their Son a 2010 Ford Fusion, or It's Equivalent, Club", oldfarmer. Car and Drivers car of the year in 2010. Nice find and buy. It really is a very nice car to drive.

    Car and Driver does not have a “Car of the Year” award- that is a PR stunt conducted by Motor Trend. Car and Driver has a “10 Best List,” and in 2010 a Fusion Hybrid was on that list.

    2010 Motor Trend Car of the Year – Ford Fusion

    60th Anniversary of the Award goes to versatile Ford sedan

    November 15, 2009

    LOS ANGELES, CA (November 17, 2009) – MOTOR TREND today announced the Ford Fusion has been named MOTOR TREND’s 2010 Car of the Year®. This year marks the 60th anniversary for the MOTOR TREND award – the longest standing editorial automotive award of its kind.
    2020 Honda Accord EX-L, 2011 Hyundai Veracruz, 2010 Mercury Milan Premiere, 2008 Mercury Mariner, 2007 Kia Optima
  • graphicguygraphicguy Edmunds Poster EmeritusPosts: 12,269
    Thanks for all the input. I was wondering about @oldfarmer50 suggestion. I could be a currier for dealerships, and drive dealer trades back and forth. Not sure if that’s a “thing”, though.
    2019 Kia Stinger GT2
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,345

    jipster said:


    Looks like we have a "Dad's Who Bought Their Son a 2010 Ford Fusion, or It's Equivalent, Club", oldfarmer. Car and Drivers car of the year in 2010. Nice find and buy. It really is a very nice car to drive.

    Car and Driver does not have a “Car of the Year” award- that is a PR stunt conducted by Motor Trend. Car and Driver has a “10 Best List,” and in 2010 a Fusion Hybrid was on that list.

    I’m sure I could get my rusty cargo van on any of those lists if I spread enough money around.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • graphicguygraphicguy Edmunds Poster EmeritusPosts: 12,269

    stickguy said:

    Since I have time on my hands these days, I was wondering if any car dealerships allow sales people to work part time? @roadburner, do you know? @isellhondas Craig, do you know?

    I wouldn't want to work the crazy retail hours. Maybe 2 to 3 days/week.

    probably hard in a dealership. plus they want nights and weekends. My thought for when I am in your situation (assuming I get there before I am 80!) is a high end used car place. something that sells Porsche, etc. probably a lot more internet and less volume, but less pressure. do a lot of work from home.
    The trouble is that those upscale store usually hire experienced salespeople. A newbie probably will only hired by low end places and be out in the rain smoking cigarettes and waiting for ups. I’ve delivered to some of those high pressure stores and it’s not pretty.
    I would probably be fired the first day at one of those places as I’d be telling the sales manager how to do his job.
    2019 Kia Stinger GT2
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,345

    Thanks for all the input. I was wondering about @oldfarmer50 suggestion. I could be a currier for dealerships, and drive dealer trades back and forth. Not sure if that’s a “thing”, though.

    Yes it is. It’s called ‘dealer swap driver’. Several of my Enterprise coworkers did that as well (guess 25 hours a week wasn’t enough). Usually an on call position but one guy gets called often because he owns a BMW and understands the technology. The BMW place he works for sends him out on home deliveries.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,289
    jipster said:



    2010 Motor Trend Car of the Year – Ford Fusion

    60th Anniversary of the Award goes to versatile Ford sedan

    November 15, 2009

    LOS ANGELES, CA (November 17, 2009) – MOTOR TREND today announced the Ford Fusion has been named MOTOR TREND’s 2010 Car of the Year®. This year marks the 60th anniversary for the MOTOR TREND award – the longest standing editorial automotive award of its kind.

    I remember that the Citroen SM was the 1972 COTY; the domestic manufacturers went nuts, so MT started an Import COTY category to molify the hometown boys- and went on to name some deserving American cars over the next few years, such as the Mustang II and the Citation.
    That said, I would seriously consider owning any of MT's COTY picks since 2014- except for the Bolt.

    I prefer the Road & Track Performance Car of the Year award; they weed out the anodyne transport pods.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,284
    andres3 said:

    andres3 said:

    andres3 said:

    For those that believe in DV on insurance claims, I hope my formula for calculating DV using the logic in my letter to USAA today becomes the industry standard moving forward (with Vroom being substitute-able by Carmax, Shift, Carvana, or any other well known used car buying service to establish post collison fair market value):

    Who wants to play judge, or so far in this claim, just USAA DV Appraiser yet to put out a number (here's my letter):

    Personally I would never be in direct contact with the other guys insurance company, let your insurance company or a lawyer do your talking. They will avoid the traps you will never see.
    There's truth to that, though without an offer and my signature on it accepting it, it doesn't really matter what I say or write, my Insurance company is the only authorized decision maker for USAA apparently on this claim.
    Have you ever heard the saying "anything you say can and will be used against you"? It also applies in this situation, you can hurt your position with the wrong word or phrase. I'd let the pros do my talking.

    In other words call "the guy"
    You haven't seen the insurance companies in action in Court have you? I have. Taking a page out of their playbook. Anything goes, including changing your mind about stuff that was apparently settled and agreed to a year (or more ago).
    I have been in courts enough to know changing your story without a very good reason usually hurts you and calls your testimony into question.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,284

    dino001 said:


    Sales guy called 2 or 3 times, urging me to come back in with the “if we, will you” pitch. I told him again, he had my figures and not to bother if they weren’t interested.

    I often wondered how long it took them to either hire someone who could drive it, or to even sell it.

    But your offer was clearly too low, if they didn't take it. You obviously didn't want or need that vehicle if you wouldn't raise it. by a few hundreds at least.
    Maybe! I wasn’t into their holdback. IIRC, I offered $250 over invoice. For a car that they couldn’t demo, nor even display correctly, I thought I was being fair.

    Sounds reasonable considering a manual will likely sit there longer than an automatic.

    Speaking of which I was on the bike yesterday following a previous generation Mustang doing around 45 when all of a sudden I saw the backup lights come on and heard the sound of metal grinding on metal for about a second. Oops.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,284

    Well, you gave them a chance and they didn't bite. Fair enough. When they called back I would have said. " You have my offer...all I need is a yes or a no. I do not want to go back to negotiate. I need to buy a car now so my offer is good for the next two days"

    Also, a lot of Sales Managers don't like a take it or leave it offer from a customers who has his arms folded and his heels dug into the ground and they will respond by doing the same thing. Had you said that you were willing to go another 200.00 he may have softened his posture...maybe not. In any event, I suspect that you weren't all that excited about the car.

    I think you’re right. They perceived me as dug in. They (the Sales Manager) did the same as a result. And, probably a hundred or two may have made the deal. But, I put my best offer out there, and they didn’t bite. So, to sell, to me, on that given day, it wasn’t going to happen. I was dug in, and so were they.

    As luck would have it, I bought the Cobra Convertible a couple of weeks later. Clearly I was in buying mode.
    I thought of you today when I bought my son a 2010 Ford Fusion SEL with sunroof, leather, heated seats etc. 29k miles. They wanted $8900, I said $8150. I got some push back along the lines of “we got too much into it” and “we can’t cut it that much”. I told them that they could take my offer or not but we’d still be friends either way. Finally they agreed. We pick it up on Tuesday.


    Nice looking car, congrats.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079

    stickguy said:

    Since I have time on my hands these days, I was wondering if any car dealerships allow sales people to work part time? @roadburner, do you know? @isellhondas Craig, do you know?

    I wouldn't want to work the crazy retail hours. Maybe 2 to 3 days/week.

    probably hard in a dealership. plus they want nights and weekends. My thought for when I am in your situation (assuming I get there before I am 80!) is a high end used car place. something that sells Porsche, etc. probably a lot more internet and less volume, but less pressure. do a lot of work from home.
    The trouble is that those upscale store usually hire experienced salespeople. A newbie probably will only hired by low end places and be out in the rain smoking cigarettes and waiting for ups. I’ve delivered to some of those high pressure stores and it’s not pretty.
    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.
    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)

    Thanks for all the input. I was wondering about @oldfarmer50 suggestion. I could be a currier for dealerships, and drive dealer trades back and forth. Not sure if that’s a “thing”, though.

    ...maybe valet parking. Get to try lots of different cars, and in a fancy place like a casino get some hot cars to try, race to the lower floor around all those curves.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,345
    driver100 said:

    stickguy said:

    Since I have time on my hands these days, I was wondering if any car dealerships allow sales people to work part time? @roadburner, do you know? @isellhondas Craig, do you know?

    I wouldn't want to work the crazy retail hours. Maybe 2 to 3 days/week.

    probably hard in a dealership. plus they want nights and weekends. My thought for when I am in your situation (assuming I get there before I am 80!) is a high end used car place. something that sells Porsche, etc. probably a lot more internet and less volume, but less pressure. do a lot of work from home.
    The trouble is that those upscale store usually hire experienced salespeople. A newbie probably will only hired by low end places and be out in the rain smoking cigarettes and waiting for ups. I’ve delivered to some of those high pressure stores and it’s not pretty.
    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.
    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)

    Thanks for all the input. I was wondering about @oldfarmer50 suggestion. I could be a currier for dealerships, and drive dealer trades back and forth. Not sure if that’s a “thing”, though.

    ...maybe valet parking. Get to try lots of different cars, and in a fancy place like a casino get some hot cars to try, race to the lower floor around all those curves.
    Valet parking is for the young. The amount of physical running you do is unbelievable. All for a one minute ride.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 27,616

    driver100 said:



    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.

    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)
    You couldn’t pay me enough to push soul-slaughtering appliances to payment buyers.

    One man’s soul-crusher is another man’s dream car.

    '19 Ioniq plug-in, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 50-car history and counting!

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,289
    edited June 7
    qbrozen said:

    driver100 said:



    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.

    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)
    You couldn’t pay me enough to push soul-slaughtering appliances to payment buyers.

    One man’s soul-crusher is another man’s dream car.
    I’m an enthusiast who believes that the one unforgivable sin a car can commit is to be boring. I realize that there are those who view a car as equivalent to a washing machine or refrigerator; that’s their choice and I have no problem with it- I just couldn’t relate to those individuals in a sales context. I’d also likely doze off on every test drive.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079

    driver100 said:

    stickguy said:

    Since I have time on my hands these days, I was wondering if any car dealerships allow sales people to work part time? @roadburner, do you know? @isellhondas Craig, do you know?

    I wouldn't want to work the crazy retail hours. Maybe 2 to 3 days/week.

    probably hard in a dealership. plus they want nights and weekends. My thought for when I am in your situation (assuming I get there before I am 80!) is a high end used car place. something that sells Porsche, etc. probably a lot more internet and less volume, but less pressure. do a lot of work from home.
    The trouble is that those upscale store usually hire experienced salespeople. A newbie probably will only hired by low end places and be out in the rain smoking cigarettes and waiting for ups. I’ve delivered to some of those high pressure stores and it’s not pretty.
    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.
    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)

    Thanks for all the input. I was wondering about @oldfarmer50 suggestion. I could be a currier for dealerships, and drive dealer trades back and forth. Not sure if that’s a “thing”, though.

    ...maybe valet parking. Get to try lots of different cars, and in a fancy place like a casino get some hot cars to try, race to the lower floor around all those curves.
    Valet parking is for the young. The amount of physical running you do is unbelievable. All for a one minute ride.
    It is so bad now you need a Valetcam. They suggest leaving a tip on the dash before you hand your car over.
    I can see it now, "Cheap b------, I'll teach him to leave me just a fiver".
    I have used a valet probably less than 10 times in my life...maybe less than 6, but once I know my car had everything in the trunk thrown around.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079
    qbrozen said:

    driver100 said:



    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.

    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)
    You couldn’t pay me enough to push soul-slaughtering appliances to payment buyers.

    One man’s soul-crusher is another man’s dream car.
    I could justify selling Toyotas or Hyundais to myself because I am providing a necessary service, helping people to find the car that suits them at a price they can afford....that would give me some satisfaction.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,289
    On a related note, On CCBA I mentioned another forum where there is a subset of members who insist that the pinnacle of automotive excellence is an entry level penalty box that can travel intergalactic distances with only minimal upkeep. I was discussing a couple of entertaining cars with another participant and one of the hairshirt brigade posted, “But how will those cars hold up over 400,000 miles?”
    I replied, “If I faced the prospect of driving most any car for 400,000 miles I would just cut to the chase and jump off a very tall building.”

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,289
    driver100 said:



    I could justify selling Toyotas or Hyundais to myself because I am providing a necessary service, helping people to find the car that suits them at a price they can afford....that would give me some satisfaction.

    As Toyota goes, I could sell the 86, the Supra, and the trucks with a straight face. Hyundai? The Veloster N is about it.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079

    driver100 said:



    I could justify selling Toyotas or Hyundais to myself because I am providing a necessary service, helping people to find the car that suits them at a price they can afford....that would give me some satisfaction.

    As Toyota goes, I could sell the 86, the Supra, and the trucks with a straight face. Hyundai? The Veloster N is about it.
    I'd steer them away from any Velocity....too ugly :@

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079

    On a related note, On CCBA I mentioned another forum where there is a subset of members who insist that the pinnacle of automotive excellence is an entry level penalty box that can travel intergalactic distances with only minimal upkeep. I was discussing a couple of entertaining cars with another participant and one of the hairshirt brigade posted, “But how will those cars hold up over 400,000 miles?”
    I replied, “If I faced the prospect of driving most any car for 400,000 miles I would just cut to the chase and jump off a very tall building.”

    It depends on your goals in life.......I am here for a good time, not a long time. :p

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,345

    On a related note, On CCBA I mentioned another forum where there is a subset of members who insist that the pinnacle of automotive excellence is an entry level penalty box that can travel intergalactic distances with only minimal upkeep. I was discussing a couple of entertaining cars with another participant and one of the hairshirt brigade posted, “But how will those cars hold up over 400,000 miles?”
    I replied, “If I faced the prospect of driving most any car for 400,000 miles I would just cut to the chase and jump off a very tall building.”

    And you say that knowing I have to sell the kid’s PT Cruiser this week. :( What’s a car salesman to do?

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 24,751
    edited June 7
    This reminds me of a long time friend who felt sorry for his 20-year old son and bought him a car this week. He contacted a neighbor who runs a junkyard. Asked if she had anything cheap that runs well. Arranged for her to have junior take delivery of an older model from her stock.

    When junior stopped to pick up his Ford (maybe a Contour?), silver with faded raspberry interior, 1992 model, his face dropped dramatically when she pointed it out to the son, is the report from the lady running the used car end of the wrecker yard.

    2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT, 2015 Cruze 2LT,

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 27,616
    edited June 7

    qbrozen said:

    driver100 said:



    I couldn't work in most dealerships; I can only sell something I actually enjoy driving to some degree. BMW, Mini, and Porsche would be about it.

    I can only sell something I believe in....but, for the right amount of money, I could believe in just about anything. B)
    You couldn’t pay me enough to push soul-slaughtering appliances to payment buyers.

    One man’s soul-crusher is another man’s dream car.
    I’m an enthusiast who believes that the one unforgivable sin a car can commit is to be boring. I realize that there are those who view a car as equivalent to a washing machine or refrigerator; that’s their choice and I have no problem with it- I just couldn’t relate to those individuals in a sales context. I’d also likely doze off on every test drive.
    I think I could handle it. Well, maybe not Nissan.
    But I can find the good in just about anything else. And, if no other reason, I could at least convince myself that putting them in such cars prevents them from buying something cool and cursing that vehicle to a life of being driven once a week to church 10 mph below the speed limit. Somebody has to think of the cars!

    '19 Ioniq plug-in, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 50-car history and counting!

  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 11,125
    edited June 7
    When I started selling cars back in 2000, it was because it was Lexus that offered me the opportunity. This was in my second life - after retiring from teaching and school administration. If the sales position was with Toyota or Nissan or Ford or Chevy, etc., I would not have taken the job.

    I owned Lexus cars in the 1990's and had no problem "selling" people on the attributes of owning or leasing a Lexus. I was selling a car I would own or lease - not a car that I would have difficulty selling.

    When the opportunity arose to be a sales manager at an Infiniti dealership, I was driving a G35 at the time and my Dad was driving an M45 (2004-05). Great automobile and easy to sell others on.

    So I agree that I could only sell cars or manage sales of cars I would own. I just could not bring myself to be in the car business selling a product I would never buy myself. It's a form of "sales fraud" in my opinion. Trying to sell others on a product you, yourself, would never buy is dishonest to others as well as yourself.

    Maybe that's why I was a teacher, school principal, private school headmaster, and a salesman selling a worthy product! 🤓

    2020 Mercedes E450 4MATIC Sedan

  • fintailfintail Posts: 50,804
    Raspberry interior, so mid-90s Ford. My sister had a Contour, purple! It was a 96. When she traded it in 04, its next stop was either a sketchy BHPH lot or worse, it did not age well and there's no way it would end up on the used car section of a new car dealer, pretty alarming for an 8 year old car. She was young and not meticulous with car care, but I am certain she serviced it properly anyway. I think she got $500 for it, and I told her to be happy, given the condition. It had some electrical quirks that made it technically not roadworthy - I think it had headlight and interior light issues.

    Contours were MY 95-00 I believe, with a facelift for MY 98 which enlarged the headlights.

    This reminds me of a long time friend who felt sorry for his 20-year old son and bought him a car this week. He contacted a neighbor who runs a junkyard. Asked if she had anything cheap that runs well. Arranged for her to have junior take delivery of an older model from her stock.

    When junior stopped to pick up his Ford (maybe a Contour?), silver with faded raspberry interior, 1992 model, his face dropped dramatically when she pointed it out to the son, is the report from the lady running the used car end of the wrecker yard.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 50,804
    In visiting and browsing at the local MB dealer and chatting with the salesguys I have dealt with, I've been told I should sell them, as I already know about the option packaging and the history of the cars, and I like the cars. Not sure I could do the selling part though, I'd be more of the "if you don't want to buy it, fine, see ya" - not into the hard sell. The salesguys I know said "the cars sell themselves", but I don't know.
    abacomike said:

    When I started selling cars back in 2000, it was because it was Lexus that offered me the opportunity. This was in my second life - after retiring from teaching and school administration. If the sales position was with Toyota or Nissan or Ford or Chevy, etc., I would not have taken the job.

    I owned Lexus cars in the 1990's and had no problem "selling" people on the attributes of owning or leasing a Lexus. I was selling a car I would own or lease - not a car that I would have difficulty selling.

    When the opportunity arose to be a sales manager at an Infiniti dealership, I was driving a G35 at the time and my Dad was driving an M45 (1964-65). Great automobile and easy to sell others on.

    So I agree that I could only sell cars or manage sales of cars I would own. I just could not bring myself to be in the car business selling a product I would never buy myself. It's a form of "sales fraud" in my opinion. Trying to sell others on a product you, yourself, would never buy is dishonest to others as well as yourself.

    Maybe that's why I was a teacher, school principal, private school headmaster, and a salesman selling a worthy product! 🤓

  • carnaughtcarnaught Desert SWPosts: 2,934
    @abacomike, your dad had a 1964-65 M45, or am I reading your post wrong?
  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079
    fintail said:

    In visiting and browsing at the local MB dealer and chatting with the salesguys I have dealt with, I've been told I should sell them, as I already know about the option packaging and the history of the cars, and I like the cars. Not sure I could do the selling part though, I'd be more of the "if you don't want to buy it, fine, see ya" - not into the hard sell. The salesguys I know said "the cars sell themselves", but I don't know.


    abacomike said:

    When I started selling cars back in 2000, it was because it was Lexus that offered me the opportunity. This was in my second life - after retiring from teaching and school administration. If the sales position was with Toyota or Nissan or Ford or Chevy, etc., I would not have taken the job.

    I owned Lexus cars in the 1990's and had no problem "selling" people on the attributes of owning or leasing a Lexus. I was selling a car I would own or lease - not a car that I would have difficulty selling.

    When the opportunity arose to be a sales manager at an Infiniti dealership, I was driving a G35 at the time and my Dad was driving an M45 (1964-65). Great automobile and easy to sell others on.

    So I agree that I could only sell cars or manage sales of cars I would own. I just could not bring myself to be in the car business selling a product I would never buy myself. It's a form of "sales fraud" in my opinion. Trying to sell others on a product you, yourself, would never buy is dishonest to others as well as yourself.

    Maybe that's why I was a teacher, school principal, private school headmaster, and a salesman selling a worthy product! 🤓

    Fin, I am quite sure you know more about MBs than at least 80% of the salesmen out there. I think your knowledge and enthusiasm would carry you through......potential buyers pick up on that. When you sell luxury cars I think you can be yourself....the buyers are sophisticated, they aren't buying based on monthly payments, and the biggest factor is if the car isn't for them they will probably leave, if they do like the car it is just working out whether they are willing to pay what you want to sell the car for.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 11,125
    fintail said:

    In visiting and browsing at the local MB dealer and chatting with the salesguys I have dealt with, I've been told I should sell them, as I already know about the option packaging and the history of the cars, and I like the cars. Not sure I could do the selling part though, I'd be more of the "if you don't want to buy it, fine, see ya" - not into the hard sell. The salesguys I know said "the cars sell themselves", but I don't know.


    abacomike said:

    When I started selling cars back in 2000, it was because it was Lexus that offered me the opportunity. This was in my second life - after retiring from teaching and school administration. If the sales position was with Toyota or Nissan or Ford or Chevy, etc., I would not have taken the job.

    I owned Lexus cars in the 1990's and had no problem "selling" people on the attributes of owning or leasing a Lexus. I was selling a car I would own or lease - not a car that I would have difficulty selling.

    When the opportunity arose to be a sales manager at an Infiniti dealership, I was driving a G35 at the time and my Dad was driving an M45 (1964-65). Great automobile and easy to sell others on.

    So I agree that I could only sell cars or manage sales of cars I would own. I just could not bring myself to be in the car business selling a product I would never buy myself. It's a form of "sales fraud" in my opinion. Trying to sell others on a product you, yourself, would never buy is dishonest to others as well as yourself.

    Maybe that's why I was a teacher, school principal, private school headmaster, and a salesman selling a worthy product! 🤓

    Cars don't sell themselves fintail! There are many aspects to the "selling" of a car process. The most important, if not critical, piece is the desire on the part of the prospective buyer to "want" a specific car. It's the job of the sales professional to reveal the value built into the vehicle by highlighting the hidden rewards of owning that particular SUV or car.

    Once the buyer perceives himself/herself as the owner of that car, sitting behind the steering wheel, the rest is merely agreeing upon an acceptable price. The car sales professional's task is to negotiate with the sales manager for the buyer - that is the final stage of the sales process - the sales professional becomes the agent for the buyer. The more skilled the buyer's agent is in negotiating with management for a fair price, the more successful that sales professional becomes.

    I always took the position of becoming the buyer's agent - "...let me see what I can do for you in getting the price you are willing to pay for this vehicle..."! Sounds easier than it is - but if you truly represent the buyer's interests when going to management, you will sell a car.😎

    2020 Mercedes E450 4MATIC Sedan

  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 11,125
    edited June 7
    carnaught said:

    @abacomike, your dad had a 1964-65 M45, or am I reading your post wrong?

    Typo, carnaught. Thanks for bringing that to my attention. I have corrected the post - 2004-2005 - for the M45.

    2020 Mercedes E450 4MATIC Sedan

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 27,616
    abacomike said:

    Trying to sell others on a product you, yourself, would never buy is dishonest to others as well as yourself.

    I can't agree with that. I do that all the time. Some people need appliances because they can't handle anything else. For example, my MIL needed a new vehicle, smaller than mid-sized, new'ish with low miles for low money, reliable, good visibility, and some other things ... I directed them to a lightly used Elantra. Would I buy one? hell no. My brother needed a very cheap car big enough for his drum equipment ... got him into a Quest for I think $1500? Again, not something I'd ever buy myself. Finding a vehicle that fits a persons needs, wants, and abilities is something I rather enjoy, I do it often, and I don't see where it is the least bit dishonest. If they asked me "would YOU buy this car?" I'd certainly answer honestly. But they don't ask because they know my pain tolerance is WAY above theirs. lol.

    '19 Ioniq plug-in, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 50-car history and counting!

  • fintailfintail Posts: 50,804
    I bet I could charm my way into a few sales simply by driving the fintail to work and showing it off along with my longterm ownership story. Some older customers might be impressed by it. The salesman I dealt with for my first new car deal was somewhat similar - had been driving MBs for maybe 30 years, selling them for maybe 25, into old cars, has a vintage Porsche, etc. I dealt with him on my second deal too, but he jumped ship when the local dealer was absorbed into the AutoNation juggernaut, and has now retired, I think. Third transaction was handled by a greenpea salesman, but led by the manager I dealt with in prior ones (he offered me an oddball leftover car at a good price, which became very good with negotiation), and the latest deal was handled by a top producer who might have found my specific want list a little exasperating, but he was fine to work with.

    I'd have an easy time learning the product anyway, heck, I'd probably find errors in the training material B)

    As so many are leased, I suspect payment is some factor, but I'd think many buyers at that level would understand the relationship between payment and price. I don't know if I'd want to get into commissioned somewhat high pressure sales right now as I have never worked in anything remotely similar, but maybe at some point, it could be an option, could even be enjoyable in the right dealer group.
    driver100 said:



    Fin, I am quite sure you know more about MBs than at least 80% of the salesmen out there. I think your knowledge and enthusiasm would carry you through......potential buyers pick up on that. When you sell luxury cars I think you can be yourself....the buyers are sophisticated, they aren't buying based on monthly payments, and the biggest factor is if the car isn't for them they will probably leave, if they do like the car it is just working out whether they are willing to pay what you want to sell the car for.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 50,804
    That makes sense - get the person to want the car, and then finalize the deal - the latter part might be the real work. I suspect many looking at these cars already kind of know what they want anyway. For me anyway, I am not going that far unless I really want it, if I am paying that much, I must already think it is something nice. Still, I have never worked in sales, but when a salesman suggested I could do it, it crossed my mind.

    My latest deal was funny, as my offer was at first rebuffed, but about a month later (finalized on the last day of the month and quarter), I was contacted, and we made a deal. The price was fine, but not so much lease subsidy on this one. However, I love the car and it still feels special when I drive it over a year later, so I don't feel bad.
    abacomike said:


    Cars don't sell themselves fintail! There are many aspects to the "selling" of a car process. The most important, if not critical, piece is the desire on the part of the prospective buyer to "want" a specific car. It's the job of the sales professional to reveal the value built into the vehicle by highlighting the hidden rewards of owning that particular SUV or car.

    I always took the position of becoming the buyer's agent - "...let me see what I can do for you in getting the price you are willing to pay for this vehicle..."! Sounds easier than it is - but if you truly represent the buyer's interests when going to management, you will sell a car.😎

  • fintailfintail Posts: 50,804
    Some people would flip their lid over that nice 66 Squire these days.

    There's a Seattle variant of that commercial out there, too.
    omarman said:

    But you're helping buyers find the right car as a favor. I'd do it for a living if the pay was good or if I could own my own shop. "I don't care about making money! Omar just loves to sell soul-slaughtering appliances to payment buyers."

    Sense of humor always helps. (translation: this video is not G rated and never aired on tv.)

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyPosts: 10,462
    As so many are leased, I suspect payment is some factor, but I'd think many buyers at that level would understand the relationship between payment and price.

    Based on some of the posts I’ve read on the leasing website many of us are on, I wouldn’t be too sure.

    2017 Buick Enclave / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • dino001dino001 Tampa, FLPosts: 5,760
    I could sell thing to people if I believe they’d want and need them, regardless what I think of those products for myself. Toyota, Benz, BMW, Hyundai, or Chevrolet, all have a place in the market snd customer they’d fit. The issue is all the rest in this business, pushing thing people don’t need, bait and switch tactics, dishonest marketing, etc.

    2018 430i Gran Coupe

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 12,936
    edited June 8
    When I went to work for the provincial liquor distributor I learned to hate the expression "it sells itself". That was a line politicians loved to use to argue against anything we tried to do to make the organization run as a modern retailer and not like the sleepy unresponsive bureaucracy it had always been. No product jumps off the shelf, gets in your face, and convinces the hapless consumer to take it home. It isn't like an overly cute, friendly puppy. It needs to be the right product, with the right characteristics, at the right price, in the right location, in the right sales environment, with the right appearance and messaging, and most importantly of all, it needs to be available when the customer is in buying mode.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • graphicguygraphicguy Edmunds Poster EmeritusPosts: 12,269
    edited June 8
    I may just have some new business cards printed up and start an LLC for car transport. Will have to get off my lazy behind and go talk to some dealerships first to see if there’s any demand for those services.

    As far as sales are concerned, I’ve spent my career in high tech sales and marketing. Not sure how that transfers to car sales, though. Way different than going into a dealership and buying a car.
    2019 Kia Stinger GT2
  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,079
    To me, good salesmanship should be easy.....but, for people who have never done selling before they think there is some kind of magic involved.
    Only a con man is going to talk you into something you don't want or can't afford.
    If I can find a car, that suits your needs, and the price works for you, then why would you go somewhere else? All I can do is #1...most important FIND OUT WHAT YOUR NEEDS ARE. Then I show you the cars that suit your needs...and I explain how this car is going to suit you. If I had to con people into buying cars they won't like, I would rather find a non-selling job.
    A con man can last for a little while, but successful salesmen need repeat business and word of mouth...that will only happen if you have happy, satisfied customers.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,345

    I may just have some new business cards printed up and start an LLC for car transport. Will have to get off my lazy behind and go talk to some dealerships first to see if there’s any demand for those services.

    As far as sales are concerned, I’ve spent my career in high tech sales and marketing. Not sure how that transfers to car sales, though. Way different than going into a dealership and buying a car.

    Do you own a tractor-trailer car transporter? That’s the only outfit a car dealer would likely contract with. I think for individual car swaps/deliveries most dealers would want their own part-time (no benefits) staff. It would be tough to undercut minimum wage employees and still make a profit. You might be better off advertising yourself out to the snowbirds to drive their car down to Florida in the Fall and back in the Spring.

    Personally I’d rather have a mature driver take my car than a college kid going down for spring break.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 12,936

    You might be better off advertising yourself out to the snowbirds to drive their car down to Florida in the Fall and back in the Spring.

    Personally I’d rather have a mature driver take my car than a college kid going down for spring break.

    The problem with that is getting yourself to the location of the vehicle and then getting yourself back home once you get to the destination.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 156,857
    ab348 said:

    You might be better off advertising yourself out to the snowbirds to drive their car down to Florida in the Fall and back in the Spring.

    Personally I’d rather have a mature driver take my car than a college kid going down for spring break.

    The problem with that is getting yourself to the location of the vehicle and then getting yourself back home once you get to the destination.
    GG lives in the CVG area. $99 one way flights, every day, from almost every FL airport (once flying gets back to normal, if it ever does)

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and share!

    Edmunds Moderator

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