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Comments

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,719

    To whom are you referring? This bicycle tire discussion involves people that I don't normally react to, one way or the other, and I don't think he (or they) respond to my stuff either..

    Methinks you protest a bit too much. Perhaps I'm living rent-free inside your head.

    :DB);)

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,554
    nyccarguy said:

    nyccarguy said:

    I’m having a colonoscopy tomorrow, so I’ve been on clear liquids all day today. To keep myself occupied I decided to try my hand at replacing the seeping VANOS Oil Line. Shop booked it at 1.5-2 hours of labor plus the part ($31). I knocked it out in 45 minutes which included wrestling with the air box for a few minutes.

    Turns out someone had been in there before with this part because the lower connection had the crush washers installed incorrectly and it was a huge oily mess. Anyway, I cleaned it up, properly installed it and buttoned it back up. Test drive after and no leak at either end. Successful mission.

    Good job ( with the VANOS oil line, not the colonoscopy ). I spent 2 1/2 hours trying to change a tire on my son’s bicycle. And failed miserably. New tube. 2 holes. Patched both. The tube holds air, wrestle the tire back on. Test ride is ok. Sits in the garage for 5 minutes and it’s flat again. It’s maddening.
    2 MORE HOLES FOUND. So now I have a new tube with 4 patches on it.
    If you have 4 patches it's time to get a newer tube, you wouldn't drive a car that has a tire with 4 plugs in it would you? Make sure your tube is the proper size for the tire, if it's too wide you could pinch it installing it. Also are you using the right tools taking off and putting on the tire? You should be using a tire level.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • suydamsuydam Posts: 4,633
    @jmonroe That’s the generic tag the rescue organization puts on them (it has their phone number) until they are adopted out. Good eyes noticing that!
    '14 Buick Encore Convenience
    '17 Chevy Volt Premiere
  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 11,281
    edited July 8

    ronsteve said:

    Either that or some small sharp something stuck on the inside of the tire. Really make sure that's clean!

    This is what I was thinking also. Down in the desert it's very (very) common to get flats from the various thorns that pollute the ground, and some of them are tiny. It's helpful to lay the tube on top of the tire and note where the patches are, bearing in mind that either the tire or tube could have been mounted "upside down" resulting in mirror image patches, relative to the valve stem. Either way, note where the patches are and get in the best possible light, and see what you can feel when the casing is turned inside out. I've been down this road more than a few times Odds are, if you don't find the root cause, even a new tube will go flat shortly after it's mounted. Good luck.

    Oh, and it usually takes a while to find a "guy" who can do a job competently, and I've lost patience with paying people to screw things up, plus the time it takes to deal with them.

    You are a rare breed, @cdnpinhead - you are a man who is competent at doing a wide variety of DIY kinds of daily endeavors which I truly admire! Not only that, you are a living encyclopedia of knowledge and have a vast history of experiential interactions with maintenance and repairs of things we all come in contact with on regular basis.

    The difference between you and the average "Joe" is that you thrive on completing challenging activities while I (your average "Joe") prefer calling the "guy" because I know I will screw up royally and end up calling the "guy" anyway to undo the added mess I create by trying to DIY! 😜🤪🤓

    Envy is a good word to use in comparing my DIY activities with yours!

    2020 Mercedes E450 4MATIC Sedan

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyPosts: 10,946
    edited July 8
    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    2017 Buick Enclave / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 16,199
    nyccarguy said:

    nyccarguy said:

    I’m having a colonoscopy tomorrow, so I’ve been on clear liquids all day today. To keep myself occupied I decided to try my hand at replacing the seeping VANOS Oil Line. Shop booked it at 1.5-2 hours of labor plus the part ($31). I knocked it out in 45 minutes which included wrestling with the air box for a few minutes.

    Turns out someone had been in there before with this part because the lower connection had the crush washers installed incorrectly and it was a huge oily mess. Anyway, I cleaned it up, properly installed it and buttoned it back up. Test drive after and no leak at either end. Successful mission.

    Good job ( with the VANOS oil line, not the colonoscopy ). I spent 2 1/2 hours trying to change a tire on my son’s bicycle. And failed miserably. New tube. 2 holes. Patched both. The tube holds air, wrestle the tire back on. Test ride is ok. Sits in the garage for 5 minutes and it’s flat again. It’s maddening.
    2 MORE HOLES FOUND. So now I have a new tube with 4 patches on it.
    I think somebody’s messing with you. Did you cut some 9 year old off on your ride?

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • graphicguygraphicguy Edmunds Poster EmeritusPosts: 12,522
    @roadburner ....You’ve got mail!
    2019 Kia Stinger GT2
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 16,199

    Well....looks like SW OH is back on the mandatory mask wearing in public again. For reasons that just confound me, some (not many) of our local citizenry just doesn't get how important it is to wear a mask.

    Saw someone get kicked out of my local Costco yesterday for taking her mask off in the store. Why this is, when Costco has made it abundantly clear that it's a requirement to wear a mask inside their stores, is totally confusing to me. As she was being escorted out, I heard her say she would never shop at Costco again. At which, about a dozen people applauded her decision.

    The other question, why Costco? They are very serious about keeping their stores as antiseptically clean as they possibly can. How is that a bad thing and why does that bother so many people?

    My wife discovered employees at our local supermarket taking temperatures of customers surreptitiously this morning.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 16,199
    edited July 8
    houdini1 said:

    nyccarguy said:

    I’m having a colonoscopy tomorrow, so I’ve been on clear liquids all day today. To keep myself occupied I decided to try my hand at replacing the seeping VANOS Oil Line. Shop booked it at 1.5-2 hours of labor plus the part ($31). I knocked it out in 45 minutes which included wrestling with the air box for a few minutes.

    Turns out someone had been in there before with this part because the lower connection had the crush washers installed incorrectly and it was a huge oily mess. Anyway, I cleaned it up, properly installed it and buttoned it back up. Test drive after and no leak at either end. Successful mission.

    Good job ( with the VANOS oil line, not the colonoscopy ). I spent 2 1/2 hours trying to change a tire on my son’s bicycle. And failed miserably. New tube. 2 holes. Patched both. The tube holds air, wrestle the tire back on. Test ride is ok. Sits in the garage for 5 minutes and it’s flat again. It’s maddening.
    That brought back memories of being 10 years old and doing tube repair on my bike. The kit was contained in a red cardboard tube. The top was like a cheese grater that you used to roughed up the rubber before applying some glue which would get you dizzy if you breathed too much. Then you had to cut the patch to size. We’d have to do that every few weeks considering the punishment we gave those bikes. One of the first mechanical repairs I learned to do.

    Good times.
    We had one extra step of briefly setting the patch/glue on fire to "set" everything.
    I think that was just for fun. 🥳 As a kid we didn’t have to resort to that kind of entertainment. Back then you could get a variety of chemicals from the drug store so we bought potassium nitrate, sulphur and combined it with ground up charcoal to make our own gunpowder. Lots of explody fun.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • omarmanomarman Posts: 2,459
    Wonder what happens when they find a customer with a fever? I'm so glad I switched to home delivered groceries.
    A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 39,237

    Well....looks like SW OH is back on the mandatory mask wearing in public again. For reasons that just confound me, some (not many) of our local citizenry just doesn't get how important it is to wear a mask.

    Saw someone get kicked out of my local Costco yesterday for taking her mask off in the store. Why this is, when Costco has made it abundantly clear that it's a requirement to wear a mask inside their stores, is totally confusing to me. As she was being escorted out, I heard her say she would never shop at Costco again. At which, about a dozen people applauded her decision.

    The other question, why Costco? They are very serious about keeping their stores as antiseptically clean as they possibly can. How is that a bad thing and why does that bother so many people?

    My wife discovered employees at our local supermarket taking temperatures of customers surreptitiously this morning.
    Hopefully not with a rectal thermometer.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 39,237
    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    For sure. It’s often right after water starts gushing out, or a fire starts.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • cdnpinheadcdnpinhead Forest Lakes, AZPosts: 4,896
    They don't call it a smoke test for nothing.
    '08 Acura TSX, '17 Subaru Forester
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,719
    abacomike said:

    ronsteve said:

    Either that or some small sharp something stuck on the inside of the tire. Really make sure that's clean!

    This is what I was thinking also. Down in the desert it's very (very) common to get flats from the various thorns that pollute the ground, and some of them are tiny. It's helpful to lay the tube on top of the tire and note where the patches are, bearing in mind that either the tire or tube could have been mounted "upside down" resulting in mirror image patches, relative to the valve stem. Either way, note where the patches are and get in the best possible light, and see what you can feel when the casing is turned inside out. I've been down this road more than a few times Odds are, if you don't find the root cause, even a new tube will go flat shortly after it's mounted. Good luck.

    Oh, and it usually takes a while to find a "guy" who can do a job competently, and I've lost patience with paying people to screw things up, plus the time it takes to deal with them.

    You are a rare breed, @cdnpinhead - you are a man who is competent at doing a wide variety of DIY kinds of daily endeavors which I truly admire! Not only that, you are a living encyclopedia of knowledge and have a vast history of experiential interactions with maintenance and repairs of things we all come in contact with on regular basis.

    The difference between you and the average "Joe" is that you thrive on completing challenging activities while I (your average "Joe") prefer calling the "guy" because I know I will screw up royally and end up calling the "guy" anyway to undo the added mess I create by trying to DIY! 😜🤪🤓

    Envy is a good word to use in comparing my DIY activities with yours!
    I can’t speak for cdnpinhead, but I just don’t like living in a state of constant dependence on other people- especially when, as
    cdnpinhead noted, so many “Guys” know less than I do.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,609

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 16,199
    ab348 said:
    Overloaded beyond design capacity or deterioration due to lack of maintenance.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • omarmanomarman Posts: 2,459
    Truck driver: "But I truss-ted you!"
    Guy in Orange Vest: "Get over it."
    A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,719
    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    I agree; I have just encountered so many “professionals” that don’t even have a minimum level of competence that I want to at least know something about the subject. I think about driver’s buddy with the wannabe Maserati and how the dealer told him that his car would need a $1K “reset” after a battery replacement. I’m not enthusiastic about allowing a “professional” to give me, as the Brits put it, “a jolly good rogering.”

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,719
    edited July 8
    I remember having to teach the tractor tech what oil was recommended for my mower- and having to explain to a plumber how my water supply pump worked.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,609
    edited July 8

    ab348 said:
    Overloaded beyond design capacity or deterioration due to lack of maintenance.
    They were contractors who were there to replace the bridge.

    I guess the demolition part of the tender didn't specify how they were to do it. :D

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,554
    ab348 said:
    Gravity wins again.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 14,899
    omarman then drops mic. :D
    2019 Lincoln MKZ Reserve 1, TBD
  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811
    suydam said:

    @jmonroe That’s the generic tag the rescue organization puts on them (it has their phone number) until they are adopted out. Good eyes noticing that!

    WHOA, I didn’t say anything about your new pooch although he/she has a very attentive look on it’s face. You better not say anything that dog doesn’t like. :(

    jmonroe
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 39,237
    28, as long as you have the appropriate tools, help and knowledge, go for it. Around the house I do lots of stuff. Hanging blinds, changing outlets, changing light fixtures, Hang mirrors, painting, replacing faucets. Basically stuff my modest tool collection and lack of helpers works for! But I don’t run circuits, cut copper or move plumbing, stuff like that. Usually the line is drawn at replacing existing vs. creating new.

    Cars, I don’t have the equipment to get it off the ground safely. Or desire to dismantle too much. Or any diagnostic tools, or specialized parts. Especially on a newer car, under warranty. If I buy another 67 camaro some day, might be different! So anything beyond Basic maintenance like air and cabin filters, or a light bulb (though my current cars don’t even have those!) it’s getting farmed out. Just not feeling good about hoisting it up on the jack out of the trunk, and taking the struts out with a simple socket set and vise grips for a spring compressor!

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811

    There are some things with cars that any decent mechanic worth anything can figure out and do on their own - oil changes, brakes, suspension, etc.

    However, my opinion (which along with $3.99 will get you an egg mcmuffin), is that once you get out of that and into more serious diagnostics/repair requires an expert who actually knows and understands your car whether that be a dealer or an Indy. For instance, the Saab went to a shop that specialized only in Saabs - the BMW does the same. That way, you're at least speaking to someone who understands the various moving parts and you're more likely to get some critical thinking vs. plugging into the computer and then randomly throwing parts at a problem which adds up fast.

    Lately I've had an urge to try and fix things at home and on the car myself, mostly just to prove to myself that I can. I'd say my success rate is around 85%, which isn't terrible. More impressive to my wife is that those fixes are still holding and haven't blown up... :D

    And I’m sure that you have found out by now that skills learned for the first time on one job can be used when you do other jobs. Even learning which end of the wrench to use when you drive nails.

    jmonroe

  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 14,899
    @jmonroe,
    Using the end of a wrench to drive nails? Never thought of that, I've been using the end of a screwdriver. ;)
    2019 Lincoln MKZ Reserve 1, TBD
  • 28firefighter28firefighter Seattle, WAPosts: 7,058
    jmonroe1 said:

    There are some things with cars that any decent mechanic worth anything can figure out and do on their own - oil changes, brakes, suspension, etc.

    However, my opinion (which along with $3.99 will get you an egg mcmuffin), is that once you get out of that and into more serious diagnostics/repair requires an expert who actually knows and understands your car whether that be a dealer or an Indy. For instance, the Saab went to a shop that specialized only in Saabs - the BMW does the same. That way, you're at least speaking to someone who understands the various moving parts and you're more likely to get some critical thinking vs. plugging into the computer and then randomly throwing parts at a problem which adds up fast.

    Lately I've had an urge to try and fix things at home and on the car myself, mostly just to prove to myself that I can. I'd say my success rate is around 85%, which isn't terrible. More impressive to my wife is that those fixes are still holding and haven't blown up... :D

    And I’m sure that you have found out by now that skills learned for the first time on one job can be used when you do other jobs. Even learning which end of the wrench to use when you drive nails.

    jmonroe

    Yup - I'm certainly feeling more confident. I'm going to upgrade my tools - for about $100 I can get get a much more complete set of sockets and wrenches.

    So far I have not tackled lifting my car off the ground for anything other than swapping a tire - I was already a bit edgy about working underneath a car on jackstands, but with the latest recall AGAIN from harbor freight due to bad welds, I'm really not sure about it. That said, I'd like to learn to do brakes and a brake fluid flush, but I'm a ways off from any of our cars needing it.
    2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited, 2019 BMW i3 REX, 2004 BMW 330i ZHP 6MT
  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,527
    ab348 said:
    I wonder if there was a weight restriction posted....that truck looked pretty heavy for that bridge. However, I have a feeling infrastructure is not keeping up, and they are letting a lot of things go.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyPosts: 10,946
    At least today we have YouTube! You can search for most any repair and watch someone else do it.

    If anything it gives you an idea if you can do it.

    The air filter in my Enclave is a pretty stupid design and requires taking off about 6 Torx screws, the air tube and couple other pipes. I watched a video first just so I didn’t miss anything.

    2017 Buick Enclave / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,527
    abacomike said:

    ronsteve said:

    Either that or some small sharp something stuck on the inside of the tire. Really make sure that's clean!

    This is what I was thinking also. Down in the desert it's very (very) common to get flats from the various thorns that pollute the ground, and some of them are tiny. It's helpful to lay the tube on top of the tire and note where the patches are, bearing in mind that either the tire or tube could have been mounted "upside down" resulting in mirror image patches, relative to the valve stem. Either way, note where the patches are and get in the best possible light, and see what you can feel when the casing is turned inside out. I've been down this road more than a few times Odds are, if you don't find the root cause, even a new tube will go flat shortly after it's mounted. Good luck.

    Oh, and it usually takes a while to find a "guy" who can do a job competently, and I've lost patience with paying people to screw things up, plus the time it takes to deal with them.

    You are a rare breed, @cdnpinhead - you are a man who is competent at doing a wide variety of DIY kinds of daily endeavors which I truly admire! Not only that, you are a living encyclopedia of knowledge and have a vast history of experiential interactions with maintenance and repairs of things we all come in contact with on regular basis.

    The difference between you and the average "Joe" is that you thrive on completing challenging activities while I (your average "Joe") prefer calling the "guy" because I know I will screw up royally and end up calling the "guy" anyway to undo the added mess I create by trying to DIY! 😜🤪🤓

    Envy is a good word to use in comparing my DIY activities with yours!
    Well said. Some people love to DIThemselves, others know it is going to cost them more in the long run, and they get no enjoyment from doing it. OR, maybe you and I don't have "trust issues" Mike :p

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811

    @jmonroe,
    Using the end of a wrench to drive nails? Never thought of that, I've been using the end of a screwdriver. ;)

    Sounds like you should head on over to @28firefighter's place for a lesson on alternate tool uses. B)

    jmonroe
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,554
    jmonroe1 said:

    suydam said:

    @jmonroe That’s the generic tag the rescue organization puts on them (it has their phone number) until they are adopted out. Good eyes noticing that!

    WHOA, I didn’t say anything about your new pooch although he/she has a very attentive look on it’s face. You better not say anything that dog doesn’t like. :(

    jmonroe
    He confused you with me, now the question is which one of us should be offended.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,527

    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    I agree; I have just encountered so many “professionals” that don’t even have a minimum level of competence that I want to at least know something about the subject. I think about driver’s buddy with the wannabe Maserati and how the dealer told him that his car would need a $1K “reset” after a battery replacement. I’m not enthusiastic about allowing a “professional” to give me, as the Brits put it, “a jolly good rogering.”

    I don't think I have actually had a professional that was incompetent. I once had a dentist who was trying to get away for the weekend, I was there on a Friday afternoon getting a temporary crown put on a front tooth. His temporary tooth looked pretty bad....but, even then, I wouldn't attempt to DIMyself.
    I did cancel my next visits and went to a new much better dentist.
    I usually go by word of mouth and I always check reviews, one can do more harm than good by doing something you aren't sure of.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811
    tjc78 said:

    At least today we have YouTube! You can search for most any repair and watch someone else do it.

    If anything it gives you an idea if you can do it.

    The air filter in my Enclave is a pretty stupid design and requires taking off about 6 Torx screws, the air tube and couple other pipes. I watched a video first just so I didn’t miss anything.

    That's cheating. :@

    jmonroe
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,554
    jmonroe1 said:

    @jmonroe,
    Using the end of a wrench to drive nails? Never thought of that, I've been using the end of a screwdriver. ;)

    Sounds like you should head on over to @28firefighter's place for a lesson on alternate tool uses. B)

    jmonroe
    Or you can just watch the Red Green show.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811

    jmonroe1 said:

    suydam said:

    @jmonroe That’s the generic tag the rescue organization puts on them (it has their phone number) until they are adopted out. Good eyes noticing that!

    WHOA, I didn’t say anything about your new pooch although he/she has a very attentive look on it’s face. You better not say anything that dog doesn’t like. :(

    jmonroe
    He confused you with me, now the question is which one of us should be offended.
    There's really no question. Undoubtedly it has to be me. :'(

    jmonroe
  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,527

    jmonroe1 said:

    There are some things with cars that any decent mechanic worth anything can figure out and do on their own - oil changes, brakes, suspension, etc.

    However, my opinion (which along with $3.99 will get you an egg mcmuffin), is that once you get out of that and into more serious diagnostics/repair requires an expert who actually knows and understands your car whether that be a dealer or an Indy. For instance, the Saab went to a shop that specialized only in Saabs - the BMW does the same. That way, you're at least speaking to someone who understands the various moving parts and you're more likely to get some critical thinking vs. plugging into the computer and then randomly throwing parts at a problem which adds up fast.

    Lately I've had an urge to try and fix things at home and on the car myself, mostly just to prove to myself that I can. I'd say my success rate is around 85%, which isn't terrible. More impressive to my wife is that those fixes are still holding and haven't blown up... :D

    And I’m sure that you have found out by now that skills learned for the first time on one job can be used when you do other jobs. Even learning which end of the wrench to use when you drive nails.

    jmonroe

    That said, I'd like to learn to do brakes and a brake fluid flush, but I'm a ways off from any of our cars needing it.
    Even if I knew how to change brakes and do a brake fluid flush (I imagine you could learn to do it fairly easily - it isn't rocket science) I would not do it. Brakes should be left to experts who have insurance and have all the proper qualifications. If your brakes fail because you didn't do it right....you could be very sorry....that is one that lives could depend on.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,527
    jmonroe1 said:

    There are some things with cars that any decent mechanic worth anything can figure out and do on their own - oil changes, brakes, suspension, etc.

    However, my opinion (which along with $3.99 will get you an egg mcmuffin), is that once you get out of that and into more serious diagnostics/repair requires an expert who actually knows and understands your car whether that be a dealer or an Indy. For instance, the Saab went to a shop that specialized only in Saabs - the BMW does the same. That way, you're at least speaking to someone who understands the various moving parts and you're more likely to get some critical thinking vs. plugging into the computer and then randomly throwing parts at a problem which adds up fast.

    Lately I've had an urge to try and fix things at home and on the car myself, mostly just to prove to myself that I can. I'd say my success rate is around 85%, which isn't terrible. More impressive to my wife is that those fixes are still holding and haven't blown up... :D

    And I’m sure that you have found out by now that skills learned for the first time on one job can be used when you do other jobs. Even learning which end of the wrench to use when you drive nails.

    jmonroe

    Of course....always the wide end with the jaws. :)

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,719
    edited July 8
    Disc brakes pads are easy to change; it’s done at HPDEs all the time. On a car with fixed calipers it takes 10 minutes a corner. If you don’t feel competent to do it you shouldn’t attempt it- but it’s certainly not a complex or difficult repair.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811
    driver100 said:

    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    I agree; I have just encountered so many “professionals” that don’t even have a minimum level of competence that I want to at least know something about the subject. I think about driver’s buddy with the wannabe Maserati and how the dealer told him that his car would need a $1K “reset” after a battery replacement. I’m not enthusiastic about allowing a “professional” to give me, as the Brits put it, “a jolly good rogering.”

    I don't think I have actually had a professional that was incompetent. I once had a dentist who was trying to get away for the weekend, I was there on a Friday afternoon getting a temporary crown put on a front tooth. His temporary tooth looked pretty bad....but, even then, I wouldn't attempt to DIMyself.
    I did cancel my next visits and went to a new much better dentist.
    I usually go by word of mouth and I always check reviews, one can do more harm than good by doing something you aren't sure of.
    You must be the only car owner who hasn't experienced an incompetent mechanic but then you have to have at least a rudimentary level of what competence is.

    DIY work isn't for everyone. Some people should stick with the "Hands Off Method" or more simply put..."a man has to know his limitations". There is no sin in admitting that.

    jmonroe
  • abacomikeabacomike South FloridaPosts: 11,281
    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    In almost every circumstance, I am always over my head when it comes to "fixing" or "adjusting" things with a few exceptions:

    I can change a lightbulb
    I can wash and dry dishes
    I can adjust the AC thermostat
    I can change the AC filter
    I can turn my TV on and off

    But, I can write a dissertation on hundreds of useless topics with footnotes and exemplary syntax and punctuation. I guess I am just good for nothin'!

    2020 Mercedes E450 4MATIC Sedan

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811

    Disc brakes pads are easy to change; it’s done at HPDEs all the time. On a car with fixed calipers it takes 10 minutes a corner. If you don’t feel competent to do it you shouldn’t attempt it- but it’s certainly not a complex or difficult repair.

    People who have never changed brake pads have no idea how simple it is to do compared to the old days when cars had drum brakes. In a way I almost miss the pinging sound of return springs bouncing off the garage walls when I do a brake job now. B)

    jmonroe
  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,527
    Mike, your skills are actually quite rare so are highly valued.....in the right situation.

    Just using this as a learning moment, not accusing anyone or anything;
    What Is The Dunning-Kruger Effect?
    Put simply, the Dunning-Kruger Effect is the tendency for people to misjudge their abilities. People with less than average abilities tend to overestimate their true abilities, while those with higher than average abilities tend to not realize how much better they are. That is, some people are too stupid to know how stupid they are, while smart people assume most can do what they can. In their original 1999 paper entitled “Unskilled and unaware of it: How difficulties in recognizing one’s own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments,” Dunning and Kruger claimed that the “miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others.”

    I guess the point is....it is sometimes hard to know who is an expert, and it is hard for experts to understand that others can't do what they do. But, everyone is probably good at some skill, but very few - probably no one is good at everything!

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 39,237
    On the flip side, it’s also cheap to have it done, so relatively a wash. I don’t really enjoy wrestling tires off either, or having to jack up and brace the car without a lift. So I stick to stuff where the wheels stay on the ground, and there are limited amount of fasteners to break.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,527
    stickguy said:

    On the flip side, it’s also cheap to have it done, so relatively a wash. I don’t really enjoy wrestling tires off either, or having to jack up and brace the car without a lift. So I stick to stuff where the wheels stay on the ground, and there are limited amount of fasteners to break.

    Plus you need the right tools and these days do you have to hook back up air pressure monitors etc......? Even jacking up the car and being around it is a situation I don't want any part of these days.......there are always cases of cars falling off a jack.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,805

    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    I agree; I have just encountered so many “professionals” that don’t even have a minimum level of competence that I want to at least know something about the subject. I think about driver’s buddy with the wannabe Maserati and how the dealer told him that his car would need a $1K “reset” after a battery replacement. I’m not enthusiastic about allowing a “professional” to give me, as the Brits put it, “a jolly good rogering.”

    About the only things I don't do any more is roofing (because I don't go up on a roof any more) and appliance repair (because my threshold is very, very low).

    Major replacements such as furnaces and A/C systems I leave to the pros too.

    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

  • graphicguygraphicguy Edmunds Poster EmeritusPosts: 12,522
    driver100 said:

    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    I agree; I have just encountered so many “professionals” that don’t even have a minimum level of competence that I want to at least know something about the subject. I think about driver’s buddy with the wannabe Maserati and how the dealer told him that his car would need a $1K “reset” after a battery replacement. I’m not enthusiastic about allowing a “professional” to give me, as the Brits put it, “a jolly good rogering.”

    I don't think I have actually had a professional that was incompetent. I once had a dentist who was trying to get away for the weekend, I was there on a Friday afternoon getting a temporary crown put on a front tooth. His temporary tooth looked pretty bad....but, even then, I wouldn't attempt to DIMyself.
    I did cancel my next visits and went to a new much better dentist.
    I usually go by word of mouth and I always check reviews, one can do more harm than good by doing something you aren't sure of.
    I did have a pro who proved to be woefully incompetent and dishonest to boot.

    This was several years ago. Had a drain stopped up in the kitchen sink. I used my tools (namely a drain snake) and cleaned out the “trap” to no avail.

    Called a plumber as I wanted to use my sink.

    I had an emergency call for work, and left the plumber’s supervision to my son, who was in college and still living at home at the time.

    I came out of my upstairs office after dousing the work related “fire” and found the plumber, in my rec room (in the basement) tearing apart a wall and ceiling tiles. I was livid. He said the only way to get to the blockage was through the walls.

    Understand, I had the drain cleared before. A plumber with a long enough snake and a little bit of power would have cleared it in 5 minutes. I asked this plumber if he had tried that. He said he didn’t because he knew it wouldn’t work.

    I kicked him out of the house and had a “good” plumber to come back and clear the sink with a long snake.

    The first plumber had the gall to take me to small claims court for not paying him for the work he did. I had pictures of the damage he did, as well as the receipt from the 2nd plumber showing how he cleared the leak with the snake.

    I countersued for the repairs to the wall and ceiling.

    Magistrate heard the case, asked the plumber why he didn’t use a snake to clear the sink. Plumber said he didn’t have his in his truck at the time.

    Hit the plumber with the bill for the ceiling and wall repair, plus the court filing fees.

    Tried to collect but the plumber disappeared without a trace. Phone number was out of service. The address on his invoice was to a building that had since been vacated.

    I was SOOL.
    2019 Kia Stinger GT2
  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,811
    venture said:

    tjc78 said:

    The most important skill in DIY is knowing when you are in over your head.

    Everyone has their own threshold for when that occurs.

    I agree; I have just encountered so many “professionals” that don’t even have a minimum level of competence that I want to at least know something about the subject. I think about driver’s buddy with the wannabe Maserati and how the dealer told him that his car would need a $1K “reset” after a battery replacement. I’m not enthusiastic about allowing a “professional” to give me, as the Brits put it, “a jolly good rogering.”

    About the only things I don't do any more is roofing (because I don't go up on a roof any more) and appliance repair (because my threshold is very, very low).

    Major replacements such as furnaces and A/C systems I leave to the pros too.
    It doesn’t sound like you have much fun anymore. If you want to fix that stop over at flip house #2.

    jmonroe
  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,805
    Doesn't it seem like something should be in that oval on the back of a $10 bill? Maybe the boss said, "That's enough designing. Send it out". Sort of like the grills on the new Hondas.


    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

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