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Edmunds Members - Cars and Conversations

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  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,623

    Mentioned it was time to get the Stinger’s oil changed. Given the dealer threw in 6 services to make up for their insistence on charging a doc fee when I bought it at the first of the year, it was “on the house”.

    Anyway, nothing untoward happened. I got used to being catered to with my Acura. No loaner Kia offered. It took 90 minutes. They did the oil change, the tire rotation the numerous and sundry eyeball checks of everything else. Cost? $0! Still, it took 90 minutes. Forgot how time consuming dealer service can be. They have all the tools, they have lifts, they have everything they need. Yet, it took them 3x the amount of time it should have. And, I even made an appointment.

    Good news is the service area was super clean. Their free coffee was actually quite good. They had cookies and chips for the taking. There was free WiFi. They practiced “no touch” customer interfacing. Everything was done via texts and emails on my iPhone. They asked if I wanted a free car wash, which I declined given it was one of those brush automated machines.

    Long and short of it, I was happy with the service experience. They were polite. They did what they said they were going to do. Their service area was pleasant and comfortable.

    They said they were still offering no charge pick up and drop off service on cars still under warranty (which would be a lot of cars given their lengthy warranty). Probably should have done that.

    Still, went off without a hitch. Given the stories about Kia, I’m pleasantly surprised.

    If I was 100% sure that the Louisville dealers would provide competent service I’d be much more inclined to consider a Stinger. I have to admit that I’m spoiled by my BMW dealer- by their quality of service as well as their loaner policy.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,461


    So that’s what they’re called. That square design was popular down here maybe 15 years ago. Now you can’t find the drill bits to take them out.

    That's because they're sending them all up here.

    I am a poor Canadian in that I pay very little attention to the NHL, think the Canadian Football League is a bad joke, root against the Blue Jays, and do not like square-head fasteners. While they do seem to allow more twisting force, that is dependent upon a perfect driving bit, a perfectly perpendicular position of the tool, and a perfectly-formed screw head. Any deviation from any of those can result in a spinning bit which deforms itself and then becomes unusable in the future.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,444

    ab348 said:

    stickguy said:

    does not look promising.

    That'll buff right out.
    Just couldn't help yourself, could you? :angry:
    Doesn't look all that damaged from the parts that are visible. Seemed like
    the right time to say "it."
    There is NO right time to say it.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoPosts: 158,009
    nyccarguy said:

    Michaell said:

    For the last 10-12 years of his career, my dad was the fire cause investigator for our city (similar to the Robert DeNiro character in Backdraft).

    However, my dad went through the Police Academy around age 45 so he could also make the arrests if he determined the cause of a fire to be arson.

    One person decided to torch his garage with his classic Corvette in it, to collect the insurance money. The perp fled to Canada, where the Mounties tracked him down. My dad had to fly to Banff to retrieve the other vehicle, which was a 70's or 80's full size Blazer, and drive it back to CA.

    My dad was not a big fan of road trips, but brought that beast back as evidence.

    I do believe he was found guilty by a jury of his peers.

    Very cool story!
    Most of his work was dealing with dumpster fires set by kids, and yanking them out of class to tell them the error of their ways.

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and let us know! Post a pic of your new purchase or lease!


    MODERATOR

    2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,444
    abacomike said:

    abacomike said:

    Had the new TempurPedic mattress and adjustable frame delivered today. It has a dual vibrator (head and foot) and is so comfortable. I just hope it helps with my back.

    They credited my charge card for $300 because they had a special discount if you purchased a mattress and adjustable bed frame with remote which the store was unaware of. So the final price tag was $3698, no taxes because of my doctor's prescription.

    I guess if you want a good night's sleep, you have to pay for it.😜🤪🤓

    Wow, paying more for a mattress than I’ve paid for many a car! It must be nice to be rich. I’m officially jealous. :'(
    I used to be rich - now I am in the middle class. If I keep spending money, I will apply for food stamps and wefare.🤪😜🤓
    At least you can drive to the food bank in an E450.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • 28firefighter28firefighter Seattle, WAPosts: 6,957
    We bought one of the online memory foam brands 3 years ago - the Nest Signature King. Best mattress we've ever had and with coupon code it was under $1000 including tax and shipping. Unpacking it was bizarre though - it was vacuum sealed so I had to cut it (carefully) out of the plastic wrapping and basically let it inflate on the floor.
    2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited, 2019 BMW i3 REX, 2004 BMW 330i ZHP 6MT
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,461


    Wow, paying more for a mattress than I’ve paid for many a car! It must be nice to be rich. I’m officially jealous. :'(


    A high-end sleep set can easily get into 5 figures. The company that makes the one I have (which was priced about the same as a comparable TempurPedic) makes "bespoke" units that can go for $20K. Unreal.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,726

    jmonroe1 said:

    jmonroe1 said:

    omarman said:

    Only spark plug gap tools I ever used were round like that but had wire loops.

    I agree that it looks like a spark plug gap tool if you look at it quickly but like you said, a plug gap tool had different size wires not flat blades.

    The first time I saw one of those multi-screwdriver tools was when I was given one by a Lockheed service rep when our Navy squadron got our first C-130 (built by Lockheed in Marietta GA in 1962). It had as engraving of a C-130 on it with Lockheed’s name and the planes S/N. I promptly broke the small blade trying to remove a small philips head screw on one of our other planes because I was too lazy to go to the shop to get my tool box. When the rep heard I broke the tool he wanted to give me another one but I thanked him for the offer and told him, “I’m going to keep this tool on my key ring as a reminder of what happens when you’re too lazy to use the right tool for the job”. He just smiled and walked away.

    I kept that tool on my key ring until just a few years ago. Finally decided I didn’t want to lose it so it now sits in my drawer on an old key ring...it did it’s job.

    jmonroe
    My spark plug gap tool has a flat blade that goes completely around the tool that increases in thickness as it goes.
    I’ve seen those but they’re more of a gimmick than a real gap tool. If I ever saw one of those in a so-called pros tool box I’d leave.

    jmonroe

    How is it more of a gimmick than a gapping tool? I have seen pros use them.
    Because a plug gaping tool has a specific piece of calibrated wire to set the gap. Therefore, you have the best chance of setting the gap correctly. Using that sliding thingy you have almost no chance of getting the gap set as accurately as you can with the calibrated wire. Now, do you have to be that precise when setting spark plug gaps, probably not. However, I like to have the right tool for the job I’m doing which is why I have as many tools collecting dust hanging on the pegboard in my garage. FWIW, you could use a flat blade screw driver to set the spark plug gap instead of that thingy you use. Afterall, it tapers up as you go from the tip toward the handle.

    To be honest, I’ve never climbed into a mechanics tool box but IF I saw one of those gimmick thingies in there I’d be a little uneasy having him work on my car.

    jmonroe

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,726

    abacomike said:

    Had the new TempurPedic mattress and adjustable frame delivered today. It has a dual vibrator (head and foot) and is so comfortable. I just hope it helps with my back.

    They credited my charge card for $300 because they had a special discount if you purchased a mattress and adjustable bed frame with remote which the store was unaware of. So the final price tag was $3698, no taxes because of my doctor's prescription.

    I guess if you want a good night's sleep, you have to pay for it.😜🤪🤓

    Wow, paying more for a mattress than I’ve paid for many a car! It must be nice to be rich. I’m officially jealous. :'(
    Let’s face it. Most of the guys in here spend more for their toothbrush than you spend on hoopties. :o

    jmonroe

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,461
    jmonroe1 said:


    However, I like to have the right tool for the job I’m doing which is why I have as many tools collecting dust hanging on the pegboard in my garage. FWIW, you could use a flat blade screw driver to set the spark plug gap instead of that thingy you use. Afterall, it tapers up as you go from the tip toward the handle.

    Let me roll out this one again because as @jmonroe1 you might have missed it originally since it was meant for @jmonroe:

    image

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • pensfan83pensfan83 PennsylvaniaPosts: 2,054
    @ab348 as long as you're cool with Sidney Crosby it's ok you don't care about the rest of the NHL B)
    1997 Honda Prelude Base - 2020 Acura RDX A-Spec SH-AWD - 2019 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off Road DC - 2006 BMW 330Ci ZHP
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,983
    abacomike said:

    abacomike said:

    Had the new TempurPedic mattress and adjustable frame delivered today. It has a dual vibrator (head and foot) and is so comfortable. I just hope it helps with my back.

    They credited my charge card for $300 because they had a special discount if you purchased a mattress and adjustable bed frame with remote which the store was unaware of. So the final price tag was $3698, no taxes because of my doctor's prescription.

    I guess if you want a good night's sleep, you have to pay for it.😜🤪🤓

    Wow, paying more for a mattress than I’ve paid for many a car! It must be nice to be rich. I’m officially jealous. :'(
    I used to be rich - now I am in the middle class. If I keep spending money, I will apply for food stamps and wefare.🤪😜🤓
    They say that it’s best to be buried in a borrowed suit.

    Although I’m planning on hooking a U Haul to the back of the hearse so I can take it with me.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,726
    ab348 said:

    jmonroe1 said:


    However, I like to have the right tool for the job I’m doing which is why I have as many tools collecting dust hanging on the pegboard in my garage. FWIW, you could use a flat blade screw driver to set the spark plug gap instead of that thingy you use. Afterall, it tapers up as you go from the tip toward the handle.

    Let me roll out this one again because as @jmonroe1 you might have missed it originally since it was meant for @jmonroe:

    image
    Well, that certainly ain’t me but I’ll admit there are times when you need a bigger hammer.

    jmonroe

  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,766

    jmonroe1 said:

    omarman said:

    Only spark plug gap tools I ever used were round like that but had wire loops.

    I agree that it looks like a spark plug gap tool if you look at it quickly but like you said, a plug gap tool had different size wires not flat blades.

    The first time I saw one of those multi-screwdriver tools was when I was given one by a Lockheed service rep when our Navy squadron got our first C-130 (built by Lockheed in Marietta GA in 1962). It had as engraving of a C-130 on it with Lockheed’s name and the planes S/N. I promptly broke the small blade trying to remove a small philips head screw on one of our other planes because I was too lazy to go to the shop to get my tool box. When the rep heard I broke the tool he wanted to give me another one but I thanked him for the offer and told him, “I’m going to keep this tool on my key ring as a reminder of what happens when you’re too lazy to use the right tool for the job”. He just smiled and walked away.

    I kept that tool on my key ring until just a few years ago. Finally decided I didn’t want to lose it so it now sits in my drawer on an old key ring...it did it’s job.

    jmonroe
    My spark plug gap tool has a flat blade that goes completely around the tool that increases in thickness as it goes.
    I inherited a gapping tool from my father that was composed of a series of blades that increased in thickness from a few thousandths of an inch up to maybe a half inch. Thought it was an odd thing to gap plugs until I found out it was a gap tool for steam turbines which he was building at General Electric.
    The wires were for plugs. The flat blades (not up to that thick, obviously) were for points - remember them?

    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

  • omarmanomarman Posts: 2,415
    I still have a set of feeler gauges in an old tool box in the basement but I can't recall the last car I had which used breaker points. Didn't miss that technology a bit. :smile:
    A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing.
  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,726
    venture said:

    jmonroe1 said:

    omarman said:

    Only spark plug gap tools I ever used were round like that but had wire loops.

    I agree that it looks like a spark plug gap tool if you look at it quickly but like you said, a plug gap tool had different size wires not flat blades.

    The first time I saw one of those multi-screwdriver tools was when I was given one by a Lockheed service rep when our Navy squadron got our first C-130 (built by Lockheed in Marietta GA in 1962). It had as engraving of a C-130 on it with Lockheed’s name and the planes S/N. I promptly broke the small blade trying to remove a small philips head screw on one of our other planes because I was too lazy to go to the shop to get my tool box. When the rep heard I broke the tool he wanted to give me another one but I thanked him for the offer and told him, “I’m going to keep this tool on my key ring as a reminder of what happens when you’re too lazy to use the right tool for the job”. He just smiled and walked away.

    I kept that tool on my key ring until just a few years ago. Finally decided I didn’t want to lose it so it now sits in my drawer on an old key ring...it did it’s job.

    jmonroe
    My spark plug gap tool has a flat blade that goes completely around the tool that increases in thickness as it goes.
    I inherited a gapping tool from my father that was composed of a series of blades that increased in thickness from a few thousandths of an inch up to maybe a half inch. Thought it was an odd thing to gap plugs until I found out it was a gap tool for steam turbines which he was building at General Electric.
    The wires were for plugs. The flat blades (not up to that thick, obviously) were for points - remember them?
    I’m not @oldfarmer50 but I remember those long thin blades for setting points but I decided to go more technical in the early 70’s and bought a dwell meter. Setting points was so much easier and more accurate with the dwell meter. I still remember (maybe because I it did it so often for me, friends and family), the dwell setting for the GM V8’s was 28 to 32 degrees. I don’t know why GM had such a large tolerance other than allowing for the accuracy of various meters. Since I had an accurate meter I always set the dwell on my cars to 30.

    jmonroe

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,461
    pensfan83 said:

    @ab348 as long as you're cool with Sidney Crosby it's ok you don't care about the rest of the NHL B)

    Funny thing - both Sid the Kid and Brad Marchand are from the same community where I also happen to live. Sid is universally beloved. Brad, not so much.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • omarmanomarman Posts: 2,415
    I remember when "accurate meter" testing meant hooking up to something like this:
    image
    I recall an old Pawn Stars episode where the old man wanted to buy one like this and it was selling pretty cheap by then.
    A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing.
  • pensfan83pensfan83 PennsylvaniaPosts: 2,054
    ab348 said:

    pensfan83 said:

    @ab348 as long as you're cool with Sidney Crosby it's ok you don't care about the rest of the NHL B)

    Funny thing - both Sid the Kid and Brad Marchand are from the same community where I also happen to live. Sid is universally beloved. Brad, not so much.
    When the Penguins won the championship in 2016 a member of the Pittsburgh media chronicled Sid's day with the Cup in Cole Harbour. Interviews were conducted with family friends, business owners, coaches, etc. and the affection for him was so obvious but when he was interviewed he made it all about his hometown and how he cherished every moment he spends there and didn't really want to discuss his notable feat of being a 2 time cup winner and cementing a legacy. As far as locally, he's a civic treasure and represented the sport as well as anyone in its history.
    1997 Honda Prelude Base - 2020 Acura RDX A-Spec SH-AWD - 2019 Toyota Tacoma TRD Off Road DC - 2006 BMW 330Ci ZHP
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,904


    Doesn't compare to loss of life and limb, but still sucks the dealership was too close to the explosion in Lebanon. Lots of damage to high dollar items.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD 2.0T
  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,376
    I loooove Marchand's moves at the end of last year's SCF B)
    ab348 said:



    Funny thing - both Sid the Kid and Brad Marchand are from the same community where I also happen to live. Sid is universally beloved. Brad, not so much.

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,983
    venture said:

    jmonroe1 said:

    omarman said:

    Only spark plug gap tools I ever used were round like that but had wire loops.

    I agree that it looks like a spark plug gap tool if you look at it quickly but like you said, a plug gap tool had different size wires not flat blades.

    The first time I saw one of those multi-screwdriver tools was when I was given one by a Lockheed service rep when our Navy squadron got our first C-130 (built by Lockheed in Marietta GA in 1962). It had as engraving of a C-130 on it with Lockheed’s name and the planes S/N. I promptly broke the small blade trying to remove a small philips head screw on one of our other planes because I was too lazy to go to the shop to get my tool box. When the rep heard I broke the tool he wanted to give me another one but I thanked him for the offer and told him, “I’m going to keep this tool on my key ring as a reminder of what happens when you’re too lazy to use the right tool for the job”. He just smiled and walked away.

    I kept that tool on my key ring until just a few years ago. Finally decided I didn’t want to lose it so it now sits in my drawer on an old key ring...it did it’s job.

    jmonroe
    My spark plug gap tool has a flat blade that goes completely around the tool that increases in thickness as it goes.
    I inherited a gapping tool from my father that was composed of a series of blades that increased in thickness from a few thousandths of an inch up to maybe a half inch. Thought it was an odd thing to gap plugs until I found out it was a gap tool for steam turbines which he was building at General Electric.
    The wires were for plugs. The flat blades (not up to that thick, obviously) were for points - remember them?
    I think I did points once and then electronic ignition was introduced. Best invention since ice cream.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,983
    andres3 said:



    Doesn't compare to loss of life and limb, but still sucks the dealership was too close to the explosion in Lebanon. Lots of damage to high dollar items.

    Impressive shock wave.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,766
    jmonroe1 said:

    venture said:

    jmonroe1 said:

    omarman said:

    Only spark plug gap tools I ever used were round like that but had wire loops.

    I agree that it looks like a spark plug gap tool if you look at it quickly but like you said, a plug gap tool had different size wires not flat blades.

    The first time I saw one of those multi-screwdriver tools was when I was given one by a Lockheed service rep when our Navy squadron got our first C-130 (built by Lockheed in Marietta GA in 1962). It had as engraving of a C-130 on it with Lockheed’s name and the planes S/N. I promptly broke the small blade trying to remove a small philips head screw on one of our other planes because I was too lazy to go to the shop to get my tool box. When the rep heard I broke the tool he wanted to give me another one but I thanked him for the offer and told him, “I’m going to keep this tool on my key ring as a reminder of what happens when you’re too lazy to use the right tool for the job”. He just smiled and walked away.

    I kept that tool on my key ring until just a few years ago. Finally decided I didn’t want to lose it so it now sits in my drawer on an old key ring...it did it’s job.

    jmonroe
    My spark plug gap tool has a flat blade that goes completely around the tool that increases in thickness as it goes.
    I inherited a gapping tool from my father that was composed of a series of blades that increased in thickness from a few thousandths of an inch up to maybe a half inch. Thought it was an odd thing to gap plugs until I found out it was a gap tool for steam turbines which he was building at General Electric.
    The wires were for plugs. The flat blades (not up to that thick, obviously) were for points - remember them?
    I’m not @oldfarmer50 but I remember those long thin blades for setting points but I decided to go more technical in the early 70’s and bought a dwell meter. Setting points was so much easier and more accurate with the dwell meter. I still remember (maybe because I it did it so often for me, friends and family), the dwell setting for the GM V8’s was 28 to 32 degrees. I don’t know why GM had such a large tolerance other than allowing for the accuracy of various meters. Since I had an accurate meter I always set the dwell on my cars to 30.

    jmonroe

    Ahh yes. The dwell meter. How could I forget standing there turning the distributer and looking at the dial.

    Sometimes it seemed better setting it by ear.

    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,797
    edited August 6
    I still have a couple of the wire style plug gap tools in the toolbox, right next to a plug wrench. Neither of which have been used in a long time (other than changing a plug on the mower). And unless I get something older to replace my car when it goes back, likely never again automotive wise. And I did replace my own plugs a number of times back in the old days (when cars needed them, and you could get at them). The way engines are done these days, and coil packs, etc. plus how long they last, I doubt I will be doing them in the future.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 27,975
    I have a few plug gap tools. Never seen a “wire” unit that I know of. I have the set of feeler gauges riveted together, then a ring with various blades all around, much like the debated keyring above, but with FAR more blades, and then a continuous ring attached to plier handles. You put the plug into the seat, set the dial, and squeeze the handles. Works pretty well, but as someone else said, I’m not a fan of the continuous circle because it isn’t terribly precise.

    '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 52-car history and counting!

  • carnaughtcarnaught Desert SWPosts: 2,965
    Mrs Carnaught and I bought a king Sleep Number bed, “silver” I think for about $3k. At first it seemed quite good, maybe the novelty of it. After about 2 yrs. it just felt like a (swimming pool) air mattress on the floor. We sold it on CL and decided to go back to old school with a near top-of-the-line Stearns and Foster. The first two months were increditably good, then the da**n thing sagged, but...not enough to meet the return guarantee. It became more and more uncomfortable until we could no longer tolerate it after 2 and a half years. The “premium” mattress was a POS, a big mistake! Mind you, nether of us are heavy people. I spoke to friends and colleagues and many epseemed to like the cheaper bed in a box type of mattress, like “Tuft ‘n Needle”. Off we went to a store (not Mattress Firm, who I swear sell defects, and are currently in financial trouble). We ended up really liking “Purple 2”, a hybrid with cooling foam on top, medium firmness. After two years, we still like it and it’s holding up well - no sag and cool. With our short mattress longevity, cheaper was better. We liked the newest generation TempurPedic, so I hope @abacomike is happy with his - just too pricey with our track record.

    I should mention that the Stearns mattress and box spring from Mattress Firm was the third - the first replaced cause of a grease spot on it, the second replaced because it sagged after two mos. This was a fore-warning of what was to come and our experience with Mattress Firm.
  • sdasda Indian Land, SCPosts: 3,472
    edited August 6

    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    2016 Audi Q5 Premium Plus w/tech, 2013 Honda Accord EX, 2006 Acura TL w/nav

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 27,975
    Huh. Yep, never seen that.

    '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 52-car history and counting!

  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,766
    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.

    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 27,975
    venture said:

    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.
    Not everyone. We just used the feeler gauges for plug gapping. Works the same.

    '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 52-car history and counting!

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 16,467
    andres3 said:



    Doesn't compare to loss of life and limb, but still sucks the dealership was too close to the explosion in Lebanon. Lots of damage to high dollar items.

    Trying to resist but cant;

    Oh that will buff right out.

    2008 Sebring Ragtop, 2011 Hyundai Sonata, 2014 BMW 428i convertible, 2015 Honda CTX700D

  • cdnpinheadcdnpinhead Forest Lakes, AZPosts: 4,873
    That comment has probably reached micro-aggression status in the eyes of some (but not all).
    '08 Acura TSX, '17 Subaru Forester
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,461
    It is just so patently unfunny at this stage. Maybe we can get one of the activist groups to cancel it.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,766
    qbrozen said:

    venture said:

    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.
    Not everyone. We just used the feeler gauges for plug gapping. Works the same.
    OK. Almost everyone. How did you bend the electrode?

    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,444
    ab348 said:

    sda said:

    ab348 said:

    sda said:

    I wonder if many home builders include their name on the house key. The builder of our house in 2004 did. They, like many have since gone
    through bankruptcy. Thought it was somewhat unique.

    What is that Sears Roebuck thing on the key ring? Looks like something you might gap spark plugs or set ignition points with.
    It’s a mini screw driver. It came with a Craftsman flat blade, philips head driver pack around 1990.
    Being in Canada a flat blade tool like that is virtually useless for driving screws. Pretty much everything here is square (Robertson) head, Occasionally you need a Philips head for imported items.

    The flat blade tool might be useful for opening crown-cap bottles or prying things apart though. :smile:


    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,726
    venture said:

    qbrozen said:

    venture said:

    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.
    Not everyone. We just used the feeler gauges for plug gapping. Works the same.
    OK. Almost everyone. How did you bend the electrode?
    I never liked that tool for bending the ground electrode so I used a pair of needle nose pliers. I never had a problem doing that.

    jmonroe

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 27,975
    venture said:

    qbrozen said:

    venture said:

    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.
    Not everyone. We just used the feeler gauges for plug gapping. Works the same.
    OK. Almost everyone. How did you bend the electrode?
    Oh anything I had around. They bend easy. I’ve used a sharp edge on the car itself (think radiator support), a small screwdriver, a knife, the feeler gauge itself... the list is extensive. Then, of course, if reducing gap, just tap on a hard surface.

    '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 52-car history and counting!

  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,766
    qbrozen said:

    venture said:

    qbrozen said:

    venture said:

    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.
    Not everyone. We just used the feeler gauges for plug gapping. Works the same.
    OK. Almost everyone. How did you bend the electrode?
    Oh anything I had around. They bend easy. I’ve used a sharp edge on the car itself (think radiator support), a small screwdriver, a knife, the feeler gauge itself... the list is extensive. Then, of course, if reducing gap, just tap on a hard surface.
    How's the knee?

    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

  • ventureventure Central PAPosts: 1,766
    jmonroe1 said:

    venture said:

    qbrozen said:

    venture said:

    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.
    Not everyone. We just used the feeler gauges for plug gapping. Works the same.
    OK. Almost everyone. How did you bend the electrode?
    I never liked that tool for bending the ground electrode so I used a pair of needle nose pliers. I never had a problem doing that.

    jmonroe

    Barbarian

    2020 Ascent Limited, 2020 Legacy Touring XT

  • jmonroe1jmonroe1 Same as jmonroePosts: 1,726
    venture said:

    jmonroe1 said:

    venture said:

    qbrozen said:

    venture said:

    sda said:


    The L shaped are for gapping spark plugs, flat blades for ignition points. The flat blade with the indention is for changing the gap on spark plugs. This tool was used more than once, but not recently.

    Yes. Everyone used to have one of those in their tool box. Well, everyone who worked on their own cars.
    Not everyone. We just used the feeler gauges for plug gapping. Works the same.
    OK. Almost everyone. How did you bend the electrode?
    I never liked that tool for bending the ground electrode so I used a pair of needle nose pliers. I never had a problem doing that.

    jmonroe

    Barbarian
    My first thought was to use a small hammer but I was afraid I’d slip and crack the ceramic insulator that surrounds the center electrode, then I’d be screwed for sure. B)

    jmonroe

  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 24,926
    edited August 7
    Well, when it pours, it rains.

    Our Lennox has had the outside air handler motor replaced because it rattled on startup.

    A few months back the compressor was replaced.



    Now the continuous blower speed won't work, But the regular faster heating and cooling speed works.

    Repairman came. After 20 trips back and forth to thermostat and heater box in house, he said it was the
    blower motor itself and the control module. Under warranty for parts AND labor. YIPEE.

    He headed back to the shop to pick up a motor...

    Repaired. Technician says this is due to buying parts from outside US to save a small amount of cost on each part for the shareholders.

    2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT, 2015 Cruze 2LT,

  • dino001dino001 Tampa, FLPosts: 5,809
    Just received my new Denon AVR-X3700H receiver. Amazon delivered as promised. Seems like the supply is on, it’s now available on Denon’s website, too, but not on other sites. Amazon must have gotten some dibs on it.

    I’m running my standard music test, there are some favorite songs I like to play to test the equipment. Sting’s Wild wild sea, for example, it has those floating sounds, almost like music painting.

    One word: wow. I thought the Pioneer sounded great, But it pales. And this is just stereo. Will see how the rest goes, but so far this rig is sweeeet....

    2018 430i Gran Coupe

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 11,904
    dino001 said:

    Just received my new Denon AVR-X3700H receiver. Amazon delivered as promised. Seems like the supply is on, it’s now available on Denon’s website, too, but not on other sites. Amazon must have gotten some dibs on it.

    I’m running my standard music test, there are some favorite songs I like to play to test the equipment. Sting’s Wild wild sea, for example, it has those floating sounds, almost like music painting.

    One word: wow. I thought the Pioneer sounded great, But it pales. And this is just stereo. Will see how the rest goes, but so far this rig is sweeeet....

    There is a reason I used to buy a lot of Denon products. In particular, they made some nice universal disc players in addition to their amp tech.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '15 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T, '19 VW Tiguan SEL 4-Motion AWD 2.0T
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,983
    First day back at work. Lots of changes.

    First, our hours have changed. No more 5:30 to 6:30 choose you own time, now you get a text the night before telling you when to come in. I had to learn how to text in order to answer.

    Then it’s masks and gloves all the way. Not fun.

    On the plus side I drove some Mercedes GLC 350s (very solid feeling) and a bunch of Subaru Outbacks. They were 2019s which I think we bought from Hertz. The skuttlebutt is that we also bought the majority of the 200,000 cars which Hertz just sold so don’t go looking for them at dealers just yet.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,797
    you need to keep the mask on in the car by yourself? Ouch. Though I assume most drivers will not be following that.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • driver100driver100 Burlington, ON 7 mo/Tampa FL 5 moPosts: 27,444
    stickguy said:

    you need to keep the mask on in the car by yourself? Ouch. Though I assume most drivers will not be following that.

    Driving alone with a mask probably won't do much, but they want to be able to say they are taking all precautions for their valued customers. Also, it is a bit of a reminder for employees to be extra careful....and it may be to avoid lawsuits if an employee did contact covid. Better to over do it than under do it.

    2017 MB E400 , 2015 MB GLK350, 2014 MB C250

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,983
    edited August 7
    driver100 said:

    stickguy said:

    you need to keep the mask on in the car by yourself? Ouch. Though I assume most drivers will not be following that.

    Driving alone with a mask probably won't do much, but they want to be able to say they are taking all precautions for their valued customers. Also, it is a bit of a reminder for employees to be extra careful....and it may be to avoid lawsuits if an employee did contact covid. Better to over do it than under do it.
    For sure. They even took all our temperatures with one of those scanners before we could work. I don’t blame them with the media now on the “scare of the day” reporting on every restaurant where a single staff member tested positive.

    I’m sure the lawyers will soon pick up on this and exploit it.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,797
    got ambitious finally today and started an application to refi the mortgage. Hopefully they are slightly more caught up. Last I heard there was such high volume it was taking forever. Debated doing it, since it should only be about 4-5 years until paid off, but rates are so low might as well. Plus in 22 months the rate adjusts, so that is guaranteed to be going up. So seems like the right time. as long as it actually works out.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Posts: 15,983
    stickguy said:

    got ambitious finally today and started an application to refi the mortgage. Hopefully they are slightly more caught up. Last I heard there was such high volume it was taking forever. Debated doing it, since it should only be about 4-5 years until paid off, but rates are so low might as well. Plus in 22 months the rate adjusts, so that is guaranteed to be going up. So seems like the right time. as long as it actually works out.

    I’m not a financial wizard but doesn’t refinancing at the end of the loan save a minimal amount of money?

    I paid off a 60 month car loan 7 months early and only saved $42 in interest.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

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