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Comments

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    andres3 said:

    The purpose of a Stop sign should be related to safety reasons, not for the purpose of slowing cars down, or deterring travel on a road my taxes have already paid for the installation of, including paving.

    Er..... what? So, we're talking about a residential area that could, if not for traffic controls, allow for faster transit times than main thoroughfares, and you're arguing that stop signs should be only for increasing safety, not for slowing cars down. But, if the slowing of the cars increases safety, which, in a residential area, is demonstrated simply by the deterrence effect of the increased transit times, then these are not exclusive variables. In other words, the slowing of the cars acts to increase safety, ergo the Stop sign is relevant.

    As a taxpayer, you're welcome to travel through these areas, but please observe all traffic control measures in place to enhance the safety of the residents in that area. You may not like it, but their well-being trumps your desire to get to your destination faster.

    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,687
    xwesx said:

    andres3 said:

    The purpose of a Stop sign should be related to safety reasons, not for the purpose of slowing cars down, or deterring travel on a road my taxes have already paid for the installation of, including paving.

    Er..... what? So, we're talking about a residential area that could, if not for traffic controls, allow for faster transit times than main thoroughfares, and you're arguing that stop signs should be only for increasing safety, not for slowing cars down. But, if the slowing of the cars increases safety, which, in a residential area, is demonstrated simply by the deterrence effect of the increased transit times, then these are not exclusive variables. In other words, the slowing of the cars acts to increase safety, ergo the Stop sign is relevant.

    As a taxpayer, you're welcome to travel through these areas, but please observe all traffic control measures in place to enhance the safety of the residents in that area. You may not like it, but their well-being trumps your desire to get to your destination faster.

    You can't claim stop signs increase safety by detterence effect and not calculate for the equally offsetting DECREASE in safety at the roads you deter those drivers into taking. The same amount of drivers have to still go from A to B. You are just re-routing and redistributing the hazard and danger. It's a not in my neighborhood mentality that has no place in traffic engineering design. If the main thoroughfares are slower than a residential street, then perhaps more attention has to be placed onto those main roads!
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '17 VW Golf Alltrack SE 4-Motion 1.8T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    It has every place. EVERY place. Local streets are for local drivers. Local drivers are the ones who have a destination on those streets. The safety factor is not for those INSIDE the cars and never will be. Get over it. ;)
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,687
    and I may continue to exercise my vote and disapproval of ridiculous stop signs with my right foot being strong on the accelerator and weak on the brakes. In some neighborhoods, I swear stop signs are used like speed bumps. Once a driver goes to a Stop Sign intersection 100 times, and 100 times in a row never has to stop due to another vehicle's right of way; the installers of said stop sign lose all credibility.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '17 VW Golf Alltrack SE 4-Motion 1.8T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    andres3 said:

    and I may continue to exercise my vote and disapproval of ridiculous stop signs with my right foot being strong on the accelerator and weak on the brakes. In some neighborhoods, I swear stop signs are used like speed bumps. Once a driver goes to a Stop Sign intersection 100 times, and 100 times in a row never has to stop due to another vehicle's right of way; the installers of said stop sign lose all credibility.

    I have no problem with that! I do it as well when warranted (which is regularly). And, as long as we are willing to accept responsibility for our actions, then we are fully within our rights to do so. :)
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • slorenzenslorenzen Posts: 694
    Just finished a road trip to Idaho(Kooskia/Grangeville, then up to Coeur d'Alene) and eastern Washington State(Spokane area).

    I really liked driving in Idaho. Everyone drove a reasonable speed, I never saw tailgating, and drivers were so polite when you stepped off the curb to cross the street(This was small-town Idaho, can't say it's the same in their larger areas).

    Then we went to Washington.

    'nough said.

    Why is is that so many in Washington and Oregon drive like they're bi-polar?
  • Spokane drivers are psycho. Well, a lot of them anyway. There are those of us who at least try to do it the right way, but are routinely amazed by the antics as viewed through our windshields. Glad you survived.

  • slorenzenslorenzen Posts: 694

    Spokane drivers are psycho. Well, a lot of them anyway. There are those of us who at least try to do it the right way, but are routinely amazed by the antics as viewed through our windshields. Glad you survived.

    Thanks.

    I've been living in a small town long enough that when I go to big(ger) areas, it takes a while to ramp up the agressiveness needed to survive.

    Fintail is always talking about Seattle area drivers, and they do seem to be, uh, "special", but I think a lot of Oregonians are just as bad. Seems they can't drive in the rain.

    Go figure...
  • And we get snow. Every year. And people somehow forget how to drive in the stuff since last year.
  • I think there are a lot of people in quite a few states that don't know how to drive in the rain. or snow. mom said in Texas they wud get a occasional snow and people wud get out and go 60 like normal. I agree with @hammerhead that people do forget how to drive in the snow since last year. anybody have snow yet? We were getting small flakes last night. nothing much.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    Yeah, we're definitely into the snow season here. We had about 20" several weeks ago, most of which melted. Then a substantial amount of rain in the middle of October (which is really unusual - it's typically snow by that late), and now, we finally have a couple inches of snow. This will probably be the stuff that sticks around until May. So, mark it: October 29. Winter is come. :)
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    Finally!

    I bought my current recovery strap, which is a "snatch strap" type of a device, over a year ago and had yet to use it... until this morning.

    I got a bug to head into work early, and it was fortunate, too, because just happened across a car that went into the ditch a few moments before I drove by. I stopped, assessed, hooked up the strap, and one quick pull later the car (a Kia Spectra, IIRC) was up, out, and back on the roadway despite the glared snowpack (e.g., slippery for the recovery vehicle) and at an intersection that would be very busy in another twenty minutes or so!

    This is a great way to start one's day. Recovering, not driving the car that's in the ditch; I don't recommend that. ;)
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • xwesx said:

    Finally!

    I bought my current recovery strap, which is a "snatch strap" type of a device, over a year ago and had yet to use it... until this morning.

    I got a bug to head into work early, and it was fortunate, too, because just happened across a car that went into the ditch a few moments before I drove by. I stopped, assessed, hooked up the strap, and one quick pull later the car (a Kia Spectra, IIRC) was up, out, and back on the roadway despite the glared snowpack (e.g., slippery for the recovery vehicle) and at an intersection that would be very busy in another twenty minutes or so!

    This is a great way to start one's day. Recovering, not driving the car that's in the ditch; I don't recommend that. ;)

    Those Subie's really are worth their weight in gold up there, aren't they?
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    slorenzen said:

    Those Subie's really are worth their weight in gold up there, aren't they?

    Yessir! I used the '08 for this particular task, and I tell you, it was surprisingly simple. That snatch strap, though, is really what made the difference. Not only was it a painless procedure, but it was also a gentle one!

    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • slorenzenslorenzen Posts: 694
    edited November 2015
    xwesx said:

    slorenzen said:

    Those Subie's really are worth their weight in gold up there, aren't they?

    Yessir! I used the '08 for this particular task, and I tell you, it was surprisingly simple. That snatch strap, though, is really what made the difference. Not only was it a painless procedure, but it was also a gentle one!

    Is that like a come-along? Or do you have a winch as well? I'm not familiar with this snatch strap...
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    edited November 2015
    Oh, no.

    I think it's technical name is a "kinetic energy recovery rope." Basically, it is a braided nylon cord that is designed to stretch, then recoil, sort of like a bungee cord. The advantage is that it creates force multiplication for the recovering vehicle, which can (and does) serve to add a whole lot of extra oomph toward freeing the disabled vehicle. But, you don't want to pull gently with one of these or you're just wasting their potential.

    Come-alongs and winches are useful if you have a solidly anchored point from which you're pulling, but those can be difficult to come by at times. In a way, the snatch strap is similar to a compound pulley in a winch setup.

    When it comes to vehicle-to-vehicle recovery, I would probably rank usefulness of direct (pull-type) connections in this order, worst to best: Chain, Recovery Strap, Kinetic Recovery Rope. I won't throw winches/come-alongs in there because they can vary from useless (e.g., worse than a chain) to incredibly helpful, and it all depends on the situation. If you have a highly technical situation where distance is a problem (either can't get close or can't drive away) and you have either a distinct weight advantage on the disabled vehicle or are able to chock your vehicle, then either of these can be a real winner.
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,687
    Got an argument from someone on another website that airplanes did in fact prove speed was dangerous because of how fatal accidents are when your involved in one. Never mind that airplanes have a track record of being exceedingly safe, and that's even including non-related to the aircraft itself accidents like terrorist plots.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '17 VW Golf Alltrack SE 4-Motion 1.8T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    Darn that gravity!!!!!!!
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 25,360
    edited November 2015
    speed is dangerous. bullets prove it. throw a bullet at someone and nothing happens, but fire it from a gun and it kills. proof!


    :D

    '18 BMW 330xi; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 47-car history and counting!

  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,687
    qbrozen said:

    speed is dangerous. bullets prove it. throw a bullet at someone and nothing happens, but fire it from a gun and it kills. proof!


    :D

    If a Roger Clemens or Nolan Ryan was throwing that bullet when they were in their prime you might think differently :smile:
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '17 VW Golf Alltrack SE 4-Motion 1.8T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,687
    qbrozen said:

    speed is dangerous. bullets prove it. throw a bullet at someone and nothing happens, but fire it from a gun and it kills. proof!


    :D

    Not to mention the movie the Matrix proved that if you are fast and quick enough, you can simply dodge bullets. So driver's with fast reflexes can handle speed :smile:
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '17 VW Golf Alltrack SE 4-Motion 1.8T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,929
    Had an interesting experience yesterday: I drove up to a stop sign at a T intersection with 3-way stop signs. There were cars approaching from my right (pretty far off) and left (pretty close). I came to a full stop and watched as the older Civic to my left made a quick rolling stop and kept going, as I was turning in front of him. I hit the brakes and then hit my horn (my wife's CX-7 has a rich, full-bodied horn). To my amazement, the 25-ish guy in the Civic stopped, backed up to behind the stop sign, and waited for me to turn. Kudos to him for realizing he'd made a mistake and correcting it, rather than blasting through the intersection and aiming an obscene gesture my way as most drivers would do in that situation.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    edited January 2016
    Hah, no doubt! That's a bit of a reverse-inconsiderate-driver situation. Rare indeed. There is still hope out there!

    -----

    I can't recall if I shared this way back when it happened, but I thought about it earlier today for some reason.... Last winter, when driving my Fiesta, I pulled up to a stop light, in the left side of the right turn lane (this road is a two-lane-in-each-direction, which spreads to have two dedicated left turns, a straight, a right-only, and a 3' shoulder at the intersection), and looked to my left for oncoming traffic before making my turn. I was in the turn lane with my right signal flashing (on the rear, front, and mirror of the car).

    Aside: In my little Fiesta, I would often stay to the left part of dedicated turn lanes as that area is used less often, and therefore is less slick during the winter than the more heavily traveled paths. This is helpful in a little front-one-wheel-drive car.

    So, I happen to have a passenger, one of my employees, with me. A few cars drive by and I then have an opening. So, anticipating my opportunity, I look right to ensure the crosswalk is clear, look left, and then go. My passenger lets out a small chirp (sort of a brief surprised yell of alarm), I look right again, and this Outback driver had wedged her car between mine and the sidewalk... and, was going at the same time as me! She couldn't have done much more than just slow down a little in order to have covered that distance in such short order.

    I laid on the horn and just continued with my turn, and the other driver finally backed off and fell in behind me. But, as soon as we were on the other road, she flew by me while blowing the horn. LOL Clueless, but righteous, to the end!

    I'm not sure what was hard to read about that situation.... she had to practically drive onto the sidewalk to squeeze by me, yet I was in the lane (marked overhead if not on the icy road) with my turn signal active. How does one better telegraph intent?
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,929
    One of those times when one would wish to have James Bond's Aston Martin DB5 with the tire-shredder hubcaps.
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,687
    This should be mandatory reading for all driver's seeking out new driver's licenses or renewals in every State of the Union.

    http://www.vollynet.org.nz/Speed Limit Law and Fatality Rates.pdf

    Failure to read it makes you an inconsiderate driver.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '17 VW Golf Alltrack SE 4-Motion 1.8T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    andres3 said:

    This should be mandatory reading for all driver's seeking out new driver's licenses or renewals in every State of the Union.

    http://www.vollynet.org.nz/Speed Limit Law and Fatality Rates.pdf

    Failure to read it makes you an inconsiderate driver.

    I cannot get the link to work; do you have a Cliff Notes version? :)
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • andres3andres3 Southern CAPosts: 10,687
    xwesx said:

    andres3 said:

    This should be mandatory reading for all driver's seeking out new driver's licenses or renewals in every State of the Union.

    http://www.vollynet.org.nz/Speed Limit Law and Fatality Rates.pdf

    Failure to read it makes you an inconsiderate driver.

    I cannot get the link to work; do you have a Cliff Notes version? :)
    Essentially the Cliff Notes are:

    1) There are 100 reasons why going slower isn't safer than going faster.
    2) A lot of the studies previously published are flawed, biased, incorrect, and/or all of the above for a variety of reasons.
    3) Higher speed limits are safe.
    '16 Audi TTS quattro 2.0T, '17 VW Golf Alltrack SE 4-Motion 1.8T, '16 Kia Optima LX 1.6T
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    Thanks! I still can't get anything to come up with that link.

    The only thing "unsafe" about a higher limit is that there will always be a group of drivers who will drive at or above that speed just because it is the limit (rather than taking into account whether they really should be driving that speed). so, set the SL at 100, and you have some vehicles/drivers who can do that "safely," and others who cannot, yet some of those who cannot will do it anyway.
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 4,098
    I think that 75 is about as high as speed limits should go, even out west. American cars are not really designed to go fast (like Euro cars generally are), and many states don't have requirements on safety checks for cars like is done in Europe. So a lot of cars would be questionable at higher speeds. Not to mention the minimal driving school requirements in the US - so a lot of drivers also are not safe at high speeds. Just my opinion. I'm all for higher speed limits to a point.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 12,628
    edited November 2016
    stevedebi said:

    I think that 75 is about as high as speed limits should go, even out west. American cars are not really designed to go fast (like Euro cars generally are), and many states don't have requirements on safety checks for cars like is done in Europe. So a lot of cars would be questionable at higher speeds. Not to mention the minimal driving school requirements in the US - so a lot of drivers also are not safe at high speeds. Just my opinion. I'm all for higher speed limits to a point.

    Yep; that's exactly what I'm talking about!
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
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