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Mercedes 300D Suggestions

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Comments

  • rebuilt transmissionis how much
    and used is how much
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    Well rebuilt would be prohibitively expensive. You could replace the entire car with a nice used running one for less money.

    As for used, those are going to be very hard to find in any kind of condition. Usually when an engine goes out on one of these cars, you dispose of it.

    But if you have to have it, I'd imagine a rebuilt transmission would be $2,500 and a rebuilt engine perhaps $6,000.

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  • lwoolardlwoolard Posts: 38
    Hi I have a 1979 300sd. While driving I hear a bumping sound at the passenger side rear wheel. I traced it to what I assume is the axle. It goes into the differential and has black boots on both ends. This one,(axle?) will slide side to side and bangs on the inside of the wheel. My question is does the boot at the diff. just need changing (it is cracked) or does the whole axle need replacing. It should not slide from side to side should it? Also is this a hard job? Does the whole wheel assembly have to come off or can you replace it with the wheel on? Its a w116.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    Sounds like you need to replace the entire axle. It comes as a complete unit, rebuilt, for something like $250 or so. The joints inside are obviously shot.

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  • i've been driving this car since january and it's been fine. but two days ago, i brought the car to a maintenance center for fluid changes (motor oil, transmission, and a oil filter) i don't think anything else has been touched.

    today, i stuck the key in the ignition and normally there will be a light that shows up (i assume its to heat the glow thing), but it didnt show up. i ignored this and ignited my car. i can hear it cranking but it does not start. i tried many times and see smoke coming from the back so fuel is obviously burning. my batteries shouldnt be a problem either. what is preventing my car from igniting?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    The glow plug circuit is defective in some way. It might be the heavy fuse that protects the glow plugs (I think it's on the inner fender, driver's side) or the relay that operates the glow plugs. You can test this by taking a THICK hot wire from the battery and hooking it to one glow plug--the car will probably then start, although roughly. You aren't burning any fuel, just expelling it.

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  • but this problem is fixable right? i was wondering what could have cause this in the first place.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    Well it's a 21 year old car. Parts wear out. :D

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  • supose what u say is right, which im sure ur right, how do i fix the glow plug
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    Well you have to have a technician check the fuse and also the relay for a proper circuit, or get yourself a service manual. A digital voltmeter is your first step, and finding the fuse and the relay the 2nd step, and then testing for current passing through that circuit to the glow plugs is the third step. You might contact these people:

    http://mercedesshop.com/

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  • thanks for ur help i checked. the glow thing cracked into 2. fortunately the guy tied a piece of wire to it and did something else and it got the car started. then i drove the car to the garage and they checked that some part was overheating and they had to repair it. he also mentioned bout something melting all over a certain part. the part was like a box and it cost 80 bucks -.- he also told me to wait for the light to turn off before igniting my car because that is what probably caused it. but its all good now i guess. car is running fine.

    and another thing. my car leaks diesel. dunno how to stop it so i put some trays other my car when its parked. theres also a little squeaking sound near my fan ( or in it ) that comes and go. it usually last less than 5 mins and its gone. is there anything i can do bout it
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    Best thing is to clean off the engine with a paint brush and some Simple Green and water in a bucket. Then you can see better where it might be leaking.

    The squeaky fan is probably the fan bearing and not much you can do. If you can reach the fan, you can always squirt some lubricant in or towards the fan blade bearing but that probably won't last too long.

    Sounds like your glow plug relay fried itself.

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  • I have a 1982 300D Turbo Diesel w/ 164k miles - all original. It's rare I ever have a problem w/ this vehicle which is why i'm asking such a question. I got in the car earlier tonight, turned on the headlights and my interior lights went black as did my tag lights, right brake and parking lamp and also the right front parking lamp - headlights work, both signals work, hazards work... in addition my left turn signal is blinking fast as tho it has a burnt bulb (but no burnt bulb to be found)... Any suggestions on this?? I'm 'repair stupid' and not sure where to start.
  • cmbdieselcmbdiesel Posts: 2
    As a recent purchaser of my first MB, I was happy to find this forum. Lots of good advice, and a laundry list of things to keep in mind as my aging vehicle begins to show problems. Seems like a lot of posters need a little patience when looking for these cars. Ebay prices are ridiculously high, and unless the car is local, you really don't have any idea what you are getting. My 300sd set me back $1100.00 and came with 276,000 on the odometer, which seems to click off the miles fairly accurately. Body is all there, even the rockers, car starts immediately when key is turned, and shuts off well in the other direction. It will pull 80 on the highway comfortably, and came with good rubber. The window motors needed to be removed, opened and freed up, then repacked with grease, which has them functioning again. Next it gets a valve adjustment and a trans service, then it's ride in style until something lets go, which is a matter of when, not if.
  • i had it checked the oil is spreading from the valve i think it is
    the mechanic says he has to undo and reseal for to fix it
    i am loosing the oil since i bought the car
    and it makes a knocking sound when i am driving i am wondering if when they fix the reseal will the knoking stop he says would cost 500 to 1000 TO FIX
    IN THE MESSAGE SOMEONE SAYS THAT CAN BE DONE for less moneyty
  • what trans service did you have to pay for how much and what did they do to it
    i have to get mine 300sd turbo 1984 reseal i think its the valve at transmission mechanic is charging 500 to 1000 dllars
    some one says its a lot of money for fix
    can it be done otherwise ?
  • dfcar1dfcar1 Posts: 1
    I am working on a conversion for my 240D. I hate the highway gearing, keep trying to put it into 5th. If you are interested, I am working on a conversion to use a ford t5 5speed trans. I have a machine shop friend who is going to make an adapter plate and whatever modified parts needed. He might custom make the parts and sell a kit. If interested you can e-mail me at [email protected] and I will let you know how it progresses. 190e transmissions won't bolt up right at all. The starter is on the wrong side. We considered modifying them, but the ford transmission is easy to come by and uses a separate bellhousing, much easier to adapt.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    Do you really think that 240D is going to pull a 5th gear? You might end up doing a lot of downshifting. But it is an interesting project, and good luck with it.

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  • cmbdieselcmbdiesel Posts: 2
    Well, I have been to the mecedesshop.com forum, and feel as though I am prepared to tackle the transmission service myself. There are some excellent articles out there which would benefit anyone who wants their MB to shift nicer. Whether you do the work yourself or not, having a clue about how the system works is the first step to getting it repaired correctly. If you are going to have a shop work on the car, understand that the first step is getting the vehicle running properly. The vacuum system is connected to the throttle with a linkage, which means the amount of vacuum going to the trans is dependent upon the throttle position. Also, unless you really have no ability to find and repair leaks in the vacuum system which runs other systems in the car, then you will be paying whatever your shop charges by the hour for the tech to chase leaks. IF you have a car that runs well, has no leaks in the auxiliary vacuum systems, and it still shifts poorly, then it should only take a qualified technician about 2 shop hours to make adjustments. However, that being said, many of these old cars do not have the vacuum system as it came out of the factory. Many have had modifications done to the system, blocking off EGR, drilling out vacuum T's, changing orifices, just to name a few. Before bringing the car for service I would make an effort to visit peterschmidtransmission.com and try to locate the schematic of your car, and provide it to the tech. Also a good idea to make sure the shop you bring it to has an understanding of how much vacuum the system is supposed to generate, and at what times. If the shop suggests replacing expensive components after looking at it, best to get another opinion before agreeing. There is a huge amount of adjustment there, and many times it just needs someone who knows what they are doing, to spend some time with it.

    I'll let you know how mine comes out. I can tell you I lost quite a bit of 2-3 clunk after adjusting the valves. And anticipate more positive results after I track down the vacuum leak in the door locks and trunk.

    51 Willy's MB38
    83 300 sd
    84 Toyota FJ-60
    94 GMC Jimmy
  • brakeengrbrakeengr Posts: 98
    Check your transmission fluid level for a smooth ride- I was low by about a quarter quart, and replenishing it made a HUGE difference- In very smooth shifting- especially 1st to 2nd. as well as higher- and I swear it seems like I am getting more power too!
    I am amazed at the difference it made! ('82 300D turbo)
  • Re: Can a 240D pull a five speed?

    Beginning in 1983, US 240D's with manual transmissions came with a five speed. What little torque those engines have comes (typically for diesels) at low RPM's, so they probably would work just fine with one. I owned a 1980 4 speed which I bought nearly new and I would have liked a 5th speed for quieter highway driving just as I would like a 6th speed (higher than the 5th) in my 2004 Jetta.
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,600
    I'm not familiar with the 240D, other than knowing what it looks like, but I am familiar with the previous generation manual Jetta with the 2.0. Yes, it revs a little more than some competing cars at highway speeds, but I assume that the gearing is appropriate for its 115 hp engine. I'm okay with it as it is, but I guess I'd prefer slightly wider ratios, and a little taller 5th gear, over a 6th gear.

    In my opinion, the previous generation Jetta drives and rides very nicely. It's not as reliable as a Corolla or Civic, but it's more satisfying to drive. I'm not familiar with the new and larger 5 cylinder one.
  • I definitely agree that the previous generation Jetta (Jetta IV) like mine is a satisfying car to drive and rides and drives very well and in my case, it's been every bit as reliable as a Corolla or Civic. It's a 2.0 five-speed manual as you suspected and it's a GLS with sunroof and leather (not leatherette like the new ones). I leased it and then bought it off lease and it now has 75,000 miles. The battery was replaced under warranty and a seat heater recall was done. After warranty, the only money I've spent other the maintenance was to replace the module that controls the AC compressor at 67,000 miles. I suspected I was low on refrigerant or the compressor was out because it wouldn't engage, but it was the module. All four brake pads are original (at 50,000 miles they were worn less than 50%) as is the clutch. The car drives and rides like new and looks almost new inside and out.
    When the lease was about to expire, I rented a 5-cylinder Jetta V and decided to keep mine because the new one did not ride nearly as smoothly as mine and with the higher beltline and shorter windows, the visibility was not nearly as good. I rented another one for a week in Seattle in February and I still prefer mine. My salesman said that the 2004's and all the Jetta V's were nearly trouble-free, while the earlier Jetta IV's suffered from more electrical gremlins and workmanship issues.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    We seem to be straying off topic into Jetta ownership anecdotes.

    This topic is for Benz diesels of course--at least for the most part.

    I really can't see an old 240D pulling 5th gear unless you changed the rear end ratio. All you'd be doing is downshifting all day at the slightest rise in the road. Same if you put 6 speeds on a 5 speed car without changing other gearing. Factory engineers are smart guys and they've usually figured all this out beforehand--or, sometimes, they don't figure it out and you get a 5 speed or 6 speed car that is a real nuisance to drive.

    You have to remember that a 240D is an anemic little car that can barely get out of its own way. It begs for a turbo, not a 5 speed IMO.

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  • This morning I was driving in and noticed that heat was coming out of my vents even though whole system was turned off.

    I tried different setting including turning on the AC which works fine and for a second with aC on it felt like cooling off, then I heard a door close in the dash and all that came out was hot air?

    I have searched the forum and found one other guy asked a similar question that matched my problem but there was no answer on that one. Please help????
  • fintailfintail Posts: 46,955
    I think this might be one of those "live with it" things, unless you want to replace the climate control module.

    My W126 would do goofy things like that now and then, I just tried to ignore it. I don't know if there's a way to actually repair it other than replacing the "brain" of the system.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 63,903
    I believe there are internet sites that sell rebuilt units. Yep, typical and common problem.

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  • zaken1zaken1 Posts: 556
    Hi Everyone,
    In view of the obscene increase in the price of diesel fuel, I'd like to share the following with you. A neighbor drove over to show us his recently purchased 300D. When he opened the trunk, we could see a row of 5 gallon plastic jugs. The proud car owner, who is an engineer, explained that after buying his first tank of fuel, he decided to never pay commercial fuel prices again. So he made an extensive analysis of the viscosity and combustion properties of commonly available cooking oils. What he found was that his 300D ran just fine on all the common types of cooking oil; as long as the air temperature was above 40 degrees Fahrenheit (which it typically is here in Northern California). He then worked out an arrangement with the largest Chinese restaurant in the area, in which they agreed to give him their used cooking oil every week. He originally filtered the solids out of the oil, but later found that just letting the oil stand undisturbed in a bottle enabled the solids to soon settle to the bottom. And since then, he has been driving all over on his free fuel. The car's exhaust smells absolutely wonderful, and he has had no problems at all. Just thought you'd like to know...
  • burdawgburdawg Posts: 1,524
    This used cooking oil thing in 300D's is nothing new, it's been going on for years. Sounds like a good idea, but most people find that it's more trouble than it's worth. You have to collect the oil, filter it or let it settle out, as you say, and then preheat it unless your in a warm climate like the southwest of Florida or something like that. Even if you live there and don't you don't have a preheater a cold snap can mean no fuel will flow.
    I've always had the opinion that if this ever becomes something main stream that it won't be long before the "suppliers" of the used oil will catch on and start charging for it. Supply and demand usually drives market forces.
    BTW, this is a little off this subject, but a few weeks ago the wife and I were coming back to California from our 2nd home in Arizona. We were cruising down the carpool lane on the 210 freeway (or the 210 autobahn, judging by how fast some people try to go on it) at about 70-75mph and an out of state 300D absolutely flew around us. I estimate it was moving at 90+ easily. Anyway, I remember remarking to the wife about how that's really pushing an old 300D. Low and behold, a few miles up the freeway there it was sitting still in the carpool lane with oil dripping out the bottom and smoke coming from under the hood.
  • zadamszadams Posts: 11
    Just FYI for all those interested. There are many conversions, conversion kits, and companies who now sell the kits (some being very sophisticated with sensors and CPU in them) to get your diesel to run on waste vegetable oil (WVO). As stated, it is nothing new. I converted my 85' 300D four years ago to run on WVO and have since put 10,000 miles on it. There are multiple considerations involved with getting your engine to run properly on WVO. Most importantly making sure that the oil is filtered, dewatered, and at the same viscosity as diesel fuel (which is achieved by heating it). There are others as well. Please feel free to post with specific questions if you are interested, I'd be glad to help.

    Zak
    1985 300DT
    193,000 miles
    10,000 WVO
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