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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 64,780
    You can't really clone an E30 M3... there are so many distinct body panels, that you would have to own a body shop, just to break even vs. buying a real one..

    E36 M3s are a different matter... easy to duplicate the cosmetics...

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  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 6,414
    Yes, I recall reading at the time that the Iron Duke had Pontiac ancestry. It reminds one that the original Tempest had a 4-cylinder engine that was sliced from a Pontiac 389.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,928
    I can imagine some sketchy fender flares being shipped in from secondworldistan. It was also from a distance, so I didn't catch all the details, mainly saw the front air dam and the box spoiler.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,928
    Surprising, the one I experienced sure felt heavy! That's only about as much as my fintail...which feels heavy at times, too.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,658
    I remember the Chevy II 4-cylinder being called a "153", and I remember the 'Iron Duke' being called a "151", although of course the difference is very minor. I think I do remember the 'Iron Duke' being based on, at least, if not more, the old Chevy II four-cylinder.

    The four that was used in Tempests was indeed half a 389 and billed as a 195-cubic inch engine.

    I like the looks of the '62 Tempest a lot--I'd look for one with the Buick aluminum V8 although have heard that was only 1-2% of Tempest production. They're similar, but I like the Pontiac styling better than the Buick's. A friend who has done mechanical work on cars his whole life in Indiana, has told me I must be a masochist to want a 'rope drive' Tempest! LOL
  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoPosts: 59,104
    I bought a '79 Pontiac Sunbird when I was a senior in HS that had the Iron Duke and a 4-speed manual. IIRC, it had 85 HP. It lasted only a few years before I totaled it in an accident just a few months before I graduated college. Drove it from CA to Phoenix for school. No A/C - ouch.

    I never much liked it .. I had lots of issues with the heater core that took several visits to sort out, and when it got hot (in Phoenix? go figure) it was hit and miss as to whether it would start.

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  • berriberri Posts: 7,749
    I was the unfortunate owner of an 80's Olds Ciera with the Iron Duke. What an anemic, unreliable POS that one was! It was the third in a sequence of declining quality Detroit cars I had the displeasure of owning back then. It was so unreliable that I didn't even keep it two years before I switched to a Ford. We were literally afraid it would crap out again somewhere on the Interstate during winter with our baby on board. That's not all, it would take the GM dealer a week or two to get parts each time while I sat without the vehicle. During that time period we bought a Mazda for around town. It only had one problem with the carburetor. The part wasn't in the States, but Mazda air shipped it from Japan and I was up and running in 3 days. Customer service; and you wonder why the Japanese kicked Detroit's [non-permissible content removed] back then! Detroit is definitely building better product this past decade, but it's taken a lot of the past decade before many American's let go of their awful experiences with their product and gave them another chance. So how has Detroit responded? Raised prices, left warranty period essentially unchanged and so they are basically giving the Asians advantages again. I've been pricing crossovers and can get a better equipped Highlander for well over a grand cheaper than a Traverse or Explorer. So why should I switch, particularly given the better depreciation on the Toyota at trade and the higher CR and JD Powers long term quality ratings? Sorry about the rant, but Detroit had a golden opportunity recently and their leadership seems to be once again blowing it.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,658
    Is a Highlander a similar size and capacity of an Explorer or Traverse? I honestly can't recall the last time I've seen one.
  • berriberri Posts: 7,749
    edited November 2013
    They are actually pretty close inside, the outside looks are deceiving. Japan is very efficient in space utilization. Explorer is actually kind of tight despite it's exterior. I like the GM Lambda's, but not at a significant price premium. GM can sell them now because the market is heated, but when it returns to normalcy things might get tougher. There is a new Highlander in the wings and then a new Pilot. Both out before '14 is over. They will be roomier yet. Lambda's are getting a bit long in the tooth which may be why their resale seems lower after 3 or 5 years. GM is focused on margin, which is better than the old build 'em and promote 'em, but they risk being perceived as overpriced when the market cools. Kind of what Camry and Accord did to them before I'm afraid.
  • texasestexases Posts: 7,771
    Three old convertibles within 30 minutes: a '65 Buick Wildcat, a TR-6, and a '68 Firebird 400, all in good shape. Great day for driving, sunny, 65F.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 25,379
    or in a row. On a local road. An early Fiero (actually running on it's own power!) followed by a 67ish 2 door impala, followed by an early 60's Studebacker lark. All 3 looked like normal used cars, not over restored.

    2015 Hyundai Sonata 2.4i Limited Tech (mine), 2013 Acura RDX AWD (wife's) and 2015 Jetta Sport (daughter's)

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 64,780
    In dark gray primer.. might be a permanent paint job, as the Studebaker letters across the back were all on, as well as the Lark on the front fender...

    Spotted it getting on the freeway ramp ahead of me.... took me about six miles to catch up. I had no idea what it was from a distance of a hundred yards.. Mechanicals might have been modernized, as he was doing a steady 70 MPH, even uphill through traffic, and the tire/wheel sizes looked to be upgraded..

    Looked a little bit like this one (year, body style):
    http://atxcarpics.com/c-1963-studebaker-lark-two-door-with-v8-at-daves-perfectio- n-automotive

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  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 11,861
    2017 Ford Fusion SE 2014 Ford F-150 FX4
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,658
    That's a '62 Lark on that site, but a '63 is quite similar.

    Here's my old '63 Lark (my '64 is the blue one lower in the link)--all three of my Studes are now in Australia:

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?16626-Bill-Pressler-s-63-a- nd-64-Daytonas
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 64,780
    Unfortunately, I couldn't get in front of it to get a real good look, to narrow down the year... And, being relatively unfamiliar with the car, remembering the details later isn't going to happen...

    I knew right away, that it was different, and that I didn't know what it was.. ;-)

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,658
    That's me standing next to our old '63 (white car)...matter of fact, I'm going to wear that same red sweater to a business meeting tomorrow. ;) Pics are from 2007 I think.
  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,294
    Orange 1968 Pontiac GTO convertible at Fuller and Stanwood in NE Philly.
  • berriberri Posts: 7,749
    So do you think your 3 former Studes being in Australia is a coincidence, or are they very popular there? If they are, do you think it's a natural Australian attraction to something independent and different, or something else? Really just curious because Australia seems to me to be an interesting place with some similarities to the formation and development of the US.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,658
    edited November 2013
    Two of the three were bought by the same guy. I had none of them 'on the market'. From the Studebaker Drivers' Club forum, people knew what I had. I miss the white one the most. I had owned it 23 years and had it restored as an authentic 'driver' in the early '90's.

    When the offers came on the '63 and '64 at close to the same time, I thought, "Well, with college tuition coming up shortly, now might be the time". My '66 was a very nice, solid car, but it just didn't do all that much for me compared to the other two, and again, tuition was coming up, so I sold it.

    I think Studebakers are popular in Australia and New Zealand because they were exported there from South Bend and sold fairly well--shipped from South Bend "CKD" (completely knocked-down) and assembled by local firms there.

    My completely-uninformed opinion is that the economy in Australia must be better than here, overall. Those fellows ask your price, consider it, and if one sends good, detailed pics of it, they pay the asking price. A lot different than in the 'States. ;)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 57,604
    I've inspected quite a few cars for guys in Australia. Great people to work with, so far. They love muscle cars, but any kind of interesting American iron is attractive to them.

    Unlike the USA, Australia only developed along the coastlines. The interior of Australia is rather lethal to settlement. So your buyer will be in a coastal city.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 41,928
    edited November 2013
    Today spotted a really clean earlier model Geo Metro LSi, a handsome dark brown W126 300SE, a funny early 90s Grand Prix with fake side pipes and other JC Whitney nicknacks, and a late run Tempo along with an early 90s NYer still moving along well.
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 64,780
    We should get Graham, who frequents Mystery Car Pix to chime in.. he is in Australia..

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  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 9,658
    There was always a pretty large contingent of Australians and New Zealanders at our club's international meets in South Bend every five years. They couldn't believe that guys here would part Studebakers that they'd restore. They'd come with a big shopping list to Newman and Altman, and later SASCO, the NOS parts supplier in South Bend, and ship a bunch of stuff home.

    I've had nothing but good experiences with the Australian guys I've dealt with.

    It's funny to see Studes that are RHD and have the instrument panel 'reversed' because of it. That's the way they were shipped there, and in fact Stude offered RHD mail-delivery cars here in the 'States.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 57,604
    If you've ever driven RHD cars here in America, you'll remember what a pain it is, so I'm not surprised people would like their cars to be steering from the "proper" side. Here in the US, we usually assign a 30% hit to any RHD car in an appraisal unless that was the only way the car was ever built by the manufacturer (e.g., the MGTC).

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  • lemkolemko Philadelphia, PAPosts: 15,294
    Today is Raymond Loewy's 120th birthday. Funny, this morning I saw a movie called "Mischief" where a 1951 Studebaker Champion does a number on a 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air:

    image
  • Pardon me for jumping in. I bought as used P6B in '75. One of my friends bought a used P6 (2000TC) new. And a colleague had a P6 for a short while.

    All were, um, troublesome. In two years mine ate a shift linkage (automatic transmission), camshaft, two (2) brake master cylinders (interesting way of dying, as the pads wore the pushrod extended farther and farther and corroded, then when the pads were replaced it cut the master cylinders' seals), many thermostats (always failed closed, major overheats), ...

    When it went well it went well, but it didn't do that very often. In a way it brought to mind a long discussion in MotorSport's letters column about the wisdom of buying a use Elan. When they went well they were very nice, but the typical owner could expect to spend more time under his car than in it.

    Run away!
  • Oh, yeah, I forgot to mention that it ate three of the right angle devices that sit between speedometer and speedo cable. Three. And that meant three speedometer recalibrations on top of replacing the drives. In addition, possibly because of repeated speedometer removals, a couple of traces on the printed circuit board that holds the instruments broke. I was able to wire around them, but still ...

    And I didn't mention the heating/cooling system's controls. Vacuum operated. The vacuum reservoir sat in the right front wheel well, corroded and one day it stopped holding vacuum. Naturally it did this in mid-winter 600 miles from home. No heat for 600 miles. The vacuum lines split regularly too.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright Sonoma, CaliforniaPosts: 57,604
    I 'sorta" owned a P6 for a few weeks, but just to fix it up and flip it. It was an older one, though, not the V-8 model. I don't remember all that much about it.

    That's a pretty hefty price for an old shoebox Volvo with a lot of miles on it.

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