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I spotted an (insert obscure car name here) classic car today!

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    This caught my eye as interesting, possibly the first narrow band whitewalls? Posted in a local history group, car is a 32 Buick, was new at the time. I had thought narrow whitewalls didn't exist until around 1962:

    image
  • sdasda Indian Land, SCPosts: 3,476
    fintail said:

    This caught my eye as interesting, possibly the first narrow band whitewalls? Posted in a local history group, car is a 32 Buick, was new at the time. I had thought narrow whitewalls didn't exist until around 1962:

    image

    The narrow whitewall looks smart. Neat picture, happy buyers.

    2016 Audi Q5 Premium Plus w/tech, 2013 Honda Accord EX, 2006 Acura TL w/nav

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,842
    in a little town today, a model A vintage (well, probably a glass body remake). Very nice looking. d door convertible (top up) with no engine side panels. shiny V8 of course.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 13,646
    A '69 Hurst Olds H/O 455- white with gold stripes, of course...

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport; 2014 M235i; 2009 Cooper Clubman; 1999 Wrangler; 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2015 X1 xDrive28i Son's: 2009 328i

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    I saw what I believe was a '41 Cadillac convertible sedan with its top down, dark brown, motoring south on Route 14 in Ravenna, Ohio yesterday morning. With this front-fender styling, I think I can pinpoint the car to exactly a '41.

    One was sold at a Mecum auction in 2019. I don't know the selling price but I was pretty-much stunned at how comparatively low the estimate was--$45K to 65K. Only 400 manufactured, at least according to Mecum.

    Here is the Mecum car like the one I saw yesterday:

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/CA0819-380888/1941-cadillac-series-61-convertible-sedan/
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313

    And, on the Olds versus Chevy front, I can proudly say that the 3.8 in my '82 Cutlass Supreme would walk the 3.8 in my '80 Malibu like a dog :p (even if it was a Buick engine in the Olds...)


    ...and the Chevy had five more horses (at least in '80, LOL).
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977


    And, on the Olds versus Chevy front, I can proudly say that the 3.8 in my '82 Cutlass Supreme would walk the 3.8 in my '80 Malibu like a dog :p (even if it was a Buick engine in the Olds...)


    ...and the Chevy had five more horses (at least in '80, LOL).

    I think it was the torque that really helped out the Buick 231. IIRC, the carbureted 231 had 190 ft-lb, whereas the Chevy 229 only had 175, at least in 1980. And, that's just peak torque. I'm too lazy to look up other details, like the rpm that they hit peak torque, how broad the torque curve was, etc.

    At some point though, I think Chevy did do something to the 229 to get its torque up to 190 ft-lb as well, but I forget the year.

    My grandparents' '82 Malibu wagon had the 229, and they HATED that thing. Grandmom loved to complain about the stationary rear door windows, and that always sticks in my mind...probably partly because that was the first time I ever saw a 4-door car like that. But, I remember them complaining constantly about how slow it was, how they hated having to do a high-speed merge, and so on. This car replaced a '72 Impala 4-door hardtop with the 165 hp 350. Not exactly a musclecar, but I'm sure coming off of that, Grandmom and Granddad were definitely suffering horsepower withdrawal!

    I always thought it was a shame that Buick didn't do more with the 252 V6. It had 125 hp and, I think, 205 ft-lb of torque. I think the one road test I read of it was in an '82 Bonneville G, where they got 0-60 in about 12.9 seconds. In contrast, I remember an '81 Grand Prix with the Pontiac 265 V8 taking 14.9 seconds, and I think I've seen a Consumer Guide test of an '81 Cutlass Supreme with the 260 taking close to 18! Some of that might have been gearing, though. I just looked up the specs on automobile-catalog, and it looks like the 252 used a 2.41 axle as standard, in the midsized cars at least, while the Olds 260 and Pontiac 265 V8s had a 2.29:1 axle standard. Maybe that's not a HUGE difference, but it was enough that when Mopar tried something similar (going from a 2.45:1 to a 2.26:1), they had to adjust 1st and 2nd gear in the transmissions, because with the normal gear ratios, it would strain the transmission.

    I guess there really was no need for the 4.1 in later years though, as the 3.8 went with fuel injection and started becoming a pretty good performer. And in the cars that still used the carbureted version, most buyers were probably opting for V8s.

    In a masochistic sort of way, I'd kind of like to see a drag race between an '81 DeVille with the 252 V6, and an '82 with the aluminum 249 V8. I don't know which one would actually be lighter...while the V8 was aluminum, the Buick V6 was already pretty lightweight. And despite both having 125 hp, the V6 had a 10 ft-lb advantage in torque.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    edited September 13
    I think the demographic who likes those cars most is unfortunately fading a bit - less demand for anything but the most concours examples. In a recent issue of Sports Car Market, where they comment on auction prices, I saw a nice driver IIRC 42 Ford convertible that brought something like under 30K - unimaginable 25-30 years ago, even with those more valuable dollars. That Caddy would have been worth more then too. Good for people today who like such cars, and I like some of them too. That Caddy went for 49.5K btw.

    I saw what I believe was a '41 Cadillac convertible sedan with its top down, dark brown, motoring south on Route 14 in Ravenna, Ohio yesterday morning. With this front-fender styling, I think I can pinpoint the car to exactly a '41.

    One was sold at a Mecum auction in 2019. I don't know the selling price but I was pretty-much stunned at how comparatively low the estimate was--$45K to 65K. Only 400 manufactured, at least according to Mecum.

    Here is the Mecum car like the one I saw yesterday:

    https://www.mecum.com/lots/CA0819-380888/1941-cadillac-series-61-convertible-sedan/

  • sdasda Indian Land, SCPosts: 3,476
    I think the Olds 260 was a big disappointment performance wise. It was smooth, quiet and long lasting but not overly economical in real world driving. I drove several cars that had the 260, including a 75 Omega hatch without ac that I was thinking of buying. There was no sense of urgency from that powertrain.

    2016 Audi Q5 Premium Plus w/tech, 2013 Honda Accord EX, 2006 Acura TL w/nav

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,478
    edited September 13
    Took the Cutlass out for a drive and being a pleasant sunny day there were a lot of older cars running around. A few ‘60s Mustangs of course, but also a ‘68 Firebird the same color as my Olds, a restored and very nice late ‘60s GMC pickup, an early original-looking Avanti, a couple of Triumphs, a TR-6 and a very nice TR-3, a nice M-B W126 sedan and a ‘54 Chevy convertible.

    Also a large number of modern fair-weather cars like a modded BMW M4 coupe, an expensive-looking AMG M-B roadster, too many Porsches to count, and even a showroom-condition Pontiac Solistice with the top down.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,842
    out driving, a nice medium/dark red 280SL Pagoda. With the top down. Gorgeous looking car.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    Haven't seen any interesting cars the past couple days - with local AQI in the 300 range, I'm not going out at all. I like to at least have the vents and/or wing window open in the fintail, and with the smell lately, just not pleasant.

    I have joked that lately if I drove the fintail, the stuff coming out the tailpipe would be cleaner than the ambient air.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    I'm thinking you live in Washington, not Oregon, is that right? Not car-related, but I saw this online this morning. I belong to the Harding Presidential Sites and I was glad when this fellow was confirmed as Harding's grandson via DNA, but I sort-of see money signs here. We've been to the Harding Tomb in Marion many times; it looks straight outta D.C. for a president of Harding's reputation. :)

    https://www.oregonlive.com/trending/2020/09/portland-man-grandson-of-warren-g-harding-and-presidents-lover-wants-hardings-body-exhumed.html?fbclid=IwAR1IGuOpr87F_Hhnbp5xfV51CqJaF1bqtJkMuDjMQfxzISkhcrF0iizHHQM
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    RE.: The Olds 260 V8--I have no experience with that engine, but I did own a new 1981 Monte Carlo with the Chevy 267 V8. Based on the V6 sounds that emanated from my parents' '80 Monte Carlo, I didn't want that for mine.

    The 267 V8 was slow, but at least it was smooth and quiet, and sounded like a V8 when you 'goosed' it.

    My parents bought a new '84 Monte Carlo with 305 4-barrel and it felt like an absolute hot rod at the time. Really light gas pedal touch too.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    For andre--assuming he can see it via Facebook here. '68 New Yorker hardtop with buckets and console. I have never seen a New Yorker equipped that way.

    https://www.facebook.com/commerce/listing/1692387650936513/?media_id=3&ref=share_attachment
  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    Yep, I am in WA. Hadn't heard of that Harding mess, no doubt someone is seeking something.

    Not nice times for a cruise in old cars:

    image

    I'm thinking you live in Washington, not Oregon, is that right? Not car-related, but I saw this online this morning. I belong to the Harding Presidential Sites and I was glad when this fellow was confirmed as Harding's grandson via DNA, but I sort-of see money signs here. We've been to the Harding Tomb in Marion many times; it looks straight outta D.C. for a president of Harding's reputation. :)

    https://www.oregonlive.com/trending/2020/09/portland-man-grandson-of-warren-g-harding-and-presidents-lover-wants-hardings-body-exhumed.html?fbclid=IwAR1IGuOpr87F_Hhnbp5xfV51CqJaF1bqtJkMuDjMQfxzISkhcrF0iizHHQM

  • texasestexases Posts: 9,287
    edited September 14
    I looks like the western part of the country is having to deal with that:

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,842
    The PNW really needs the storm instead of the gulf coast. Maybe it can be rerouted!

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    AQI at the station about a mile from me has been just over 300 all morning, and really for most of the past 72 hours. I'm over it.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,842
    NJ might have taxes, but at least we don’t have that.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 163,847
    stickguy said:

    NJ might have taxes, but at least we don’t have that.

    Sending some acid rain, your way.. Yay! Coal! :(

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and share!

    Edmunds Moderator

  • jwm40517jwm40517 Posts: 206
    KY does not have CA fires or NJ taxes.
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 163,847
    jwm40517 said:

    KY does not have CA fires or NJ taxes.

    No, but we send NJ the acid rain, by burning coal for our electricity.

    It's wonderful here... ;)

    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and share!

    Edmunds Moderator

  • sdasda Indian Land, SCPosts: 3,476
    kyfdx said:

    jwm40517 said:

    KY does not have CA fires or NJ taxes.

    No, but we send NJ the acid rain, by burning coal for our electricity.

    It's wonderful here... ;)
    And you have bourbon!

    2016 Audi Q5 Premium Plus w/tech, 2013 Honda Accord EX, 2006 Acura TL w/nav

  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 14,829
    No oceans in KY. :p
    2019 Lincoln MKZ Reserve 1, TBD
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,947
    I drove down to Anchorage this morning to pickup the Q7, and I saw a five or six older vehicles in a convoy on the other side of the freeway. Traffic was reasonably heavy at the time, and they were all in the far right lane, so it was not all that easy to make out the details. It was led by an old 1930s sedan of some sort, then a late 50s something with big fins, followed by a 57 Chevy (or similar), then a 70s BMW, then an early first generation Mustang. There might have been another behind the Mustang, but it was obscured from view by a well-placed tractor's trailer.

    Anyway, it was a surprising convoy to see on a Monday morning. I left home at about 0430, so it was probably around 1030 at this time, about thirty miles shy of Anchorage proper.
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    Seen this morning two short blocks from my house--an ice blue '75 or '76 Eldorado convertible, clean and clean whitewalls, no wheelcovers (revealing that era's FWD ugly 'truck' wheels!), with the top down--when the outside temperature was 46 degrees F.!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    The "no oceans" comment cracked me up. I'm not much of a nature-lover, and if I do, it's woods and hills. My daughter who lives in the central coast of CA last Dec. took us to a couple beaches. After ten minutes, I'm like "OK, what's next?". In fact, the second day, I said, "Were we here yesterday?", LOL.

    Now, when she took us to Hearst Castle, I had a hundred questions. I'm always amazed at what the human mind and hands could do, especially in that era before trucks and power equipment.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977

    The "no oceans" comment cracked me up. I'm not much of a nature-lover, and if I do, it's woods and hills. My daughter who lives in the central coast of CA last Dec. took us to a couple beaches. After ten minutes, I'm like "OK, what's next?". In fact, the second day, I said, "Were we here yesterday?", LOL.

    Now, when she took us to Hearst Castle, I had a hundred questions. I'm always amazed at what the human mind and hands could do, especially in that era before trucks and power equipment.

    I've been to Aruba 5 or 6 times, and I think that's kind of spoiled me to any of the beaches around here. There's a lot more variety in Aruba. The beaches on the resort side of the island are clear and calm, and there are plenty of great snorkeling spots If you want it rougher, you can go over to the other, more isolated side of the island.

    When I was a kid, I remember the "sea green" color in the Crayola 64 box. It was similar to the hue of the '53 DeSoto Firedome my Granddad had bought from his brother in law. I never understood, at the time, why it was called "sea" green, because no water at any of the beaches I'd ever been to even looked remotely like that. It was usually just, at best, sort of grayish blue. But, in Aruba, at certain times of the day, the water really did turn that shade of "sea green". Usually in the afternoon, the shallower, sandier parts would pick up that hue, while the deeper parts, or the parts that had seaweed, sea grass, or whatever, would be some of the darker colors that auto makers in the 50s and 60's would attach Caribbean-alluding names to.

    Also, the water was usually pretty warm, so you could just hop right in. Oh, and every time except that last time, we had a room at a resort right on the beach. The last time, December 2019, we rented a house that was right across the street from the beach, so that just made it even sweeter. After that, coming back to the beaches, especially the ones here in Maryland, are sort of a buzzkill.

    Oddly, Aruba is the only place I've seen a DeSoto "in the wild", for lack of a better word, in recent memory. Back here in the States, the only time I'll usually see one is around car show time, when it's either at the show, en route to it, or heading home from it. But, the first time we were in Aruba, I saw a '56 Fireflite 2-door hardtop in a parking lot. And in 2014, while driving, I saw a '57 Firedome 2-door hardtop, same red and white color scheme as mine, in the oncoming lane. While those still aren't everyday occurrences, on an island of roughly 100,000 people, it's almost an infestation! :p

  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    Too bad it's such a rigamarole to visit Cuba, probably plenty of DeSotos on the road there, of course with Nissan diesel engines and wheels from a Lada, but they are still going :)
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America I70 & I75 Posts: 24,936
    edited September 16
    andre1969 said:



    When I was a kid, I remember the "sea green" color in the Crayola 64 box. It was similar to the hue of the '53 DeSoto Firedome my Granddad had bought from his brother in law. I never understood, at the time, why it was called "sea" green, because no water at any of the beaches I'd ever been to even looked remotely like that. It was usually just, at best, sort of grayish blue. But, in Aruba, at certain times of the day, the water really did turn that shade of "sea green". Usually in the afternoon, the shallower, sandier parts would pick up that hue, while the deeper parts, or the parts that had seaweed, sea grass, or whatever, would be some of the darker colors that auto makers in the 50s and 60's would attach Caribbean-alluding names to.

    I saw this rare Desoto last weekend at a local cruise in. Usually it's Plymouths of that era that are out on display.


    Like this?







    2014 Malibu 2LT, 2008 Cobalt 2LT, 2015 Cruze 2LT,

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977
    edited September 16
    I was scrolling through some crap I've been DVR'ing, and settled for an episode of "CHiPs" In the pre-credit sequence, check out this '72 Impala 4-door hardtop...


    Needless to say, it didn't end well...


    In this aftermath shot, it actually doesn't look bad, mostly just the lower bumper...


    However, the front-end buckled pretty noticeably, when it landed, so I'd be shocked if the frame wasn't bent. Or at the least, some serious suspension work would be in order. Kind of a shame though, as a '72 Impala was always one of those cars I thought was cool, and wouldn't mind having, as my grandparents once had one.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    The green on that DeSoto is very similar to the original color of my grandma's early 60s house, which was always repainted the same color until maybe 15 years ago.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977



    I saw this rare Desoto last weekend at a local cruise in. Usually it's Plymouths of that era that are out on display.
    Like this?

    Yes!! That's a dead ringer for Granddad's old '53. Well, if it was salvaged and restored. But, I just saw Granddad's old car back in late Feb/early March. A guy who lives two doors down from one of my cousins bought it back in 1986. Tried to start it with a 12-volt jump, and fried it. Lost interest and pushed it to the woods at the edge of his back yard. My cousin gave me a sectional sofa she didn't want anymore, so I went down to get it, and noticed the DeSoto is still back there, after all these years.

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    edited September 17
    That '72 Impala reminds me of how much they decontented the exterior trim of the '72, compared to the '71.

    My late, favorite widowed aunt drove a DeSoto of that year, in a dark, maroon color. It had been owned by the elderly neighbors of my grandparents--neighbors were named McDonald--and my grandfather bought it for my aunt to drive. I can remember the car so we're talking probably no earlier than '64 or so. She didn't have it long though. I remember it followed by a '50 Chevy, '56 Ford Customline, then a '58 Ford Fairlane.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 13,947
    andre1969 said:


    Yes!! That's a dead ringer for Granddad's old '53. Well, if it was salvaged and restored. But, I just saw Granddad's old car back in late Feb/early March. A guy who lives two doors down from one of my cousins bought it back in 1986. Tried to start it with a 12-volt jump, and fried it. Lost interest and pushed it to the woods at the edge of his back yard. My cousin gave me a sectional sofa she didn't want anymore, so I went down to get it, and noticed the DeSoto is still back there, after all these years.

    Wow. It's probably looking pretty rough by now!
    2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2008 and 2013 Subaru Forester(s), 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,478
    Saw an original-looking 1980 Monte Carlo out running around today, looking like a daily driver. In very nice condition but did not appear restored, perhaps rescued from some senior citizen's garage. Pale yellow in color, no vinyl roof. A rare bird nowadays around here.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    I know the Briggs-bodied 49-52 Mopars had very durable bodies, to the point where they were still fairly common in the PNW when I was a kid in the 80s - I recall someone had a 51-52 Chrysler as a daily driver a few blocks from where I lived. I wonder if the 52-54 style was similarly strong.

    Saw an 86-88 Century out in the smog today.
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 13,478
    fintail said:

    I know the Briggs-bodied 49-52 Mopars had very durable bodies, to the point where they were still fairly common in the PNW when I was a kid in the 80s - I recall someone had a 51-52 Chrysler as a daily driver a few blocks from where I lived. I wonder if the 52-54 style was similarly strong.

    I had (probably still have, somewhere in storage) an old Popular Science or Mechanix magazine that had an Owner's Report on the '52-'54 Mopars, I believe the Plymouth specifically. Some respondents complained that the new models were not as robust or as well-built as the preceding ones.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977
    My Granddad needed to get some parts for his '53 Firedome, and in the summer of '78, I went with him to a big junkyard south of Culpeper that was about 100+ acres, and rarely crushed cars. Land was cheap, so the guy would just buy up more when he ran out of room. He found another '53 Firedome 4-door, in dark green, that was rust free. He bought the hood, driver's fender, grille teeth, bumper, and some other trim pieces for around 90 bucks.

    Years later, in 1992, I went down to that junkyard for a nostalgia trip, mostly. I asked the owner about that '53 DeSoto, and he said that it was actually one of the first cars they got in when the junkyard opened in the early 60's. It was just an old car nobody wanted, but still ran, so it was driven to the junkyard. In the early days it sat out towards the front, but then the guy bought more land further back, and actually drove it to its final resting place. I was able to find the car, and it looked like not much else had been picked over since Granddad had at it. It was weathered, some windows were broken/missing, and the interior was shot, but for a car that had, at that point, been in that junkyard about 30 years, it was still remarkably solid.

    I went down a few more times, but the last time was 1997. By that point, the owner had financial problems and was starting to crush cars. Plus, a lot of stuff had rotted/rusted away by that point to where it was essentially worthless, so I'd imagine that car is gone, now. I'd be kinda curious, though. I've tried looking at it on Google Maps, but the resolution in that area is too vague. I can tell though, that a lot of the cars have definitely been cleared out.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,842
    Oh. I forgot I saw something for sale I wanted to go look at. Real close to my house, on a front lawn, a mid 80s+ (downsized) Malibu El Camino.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977
    Today while out driving I saw an '87-91 era Toyota Supra, and a bit later a '95-99 style Nissan Maxima. Both white. Both looked pretty decent, although not exactly glistening with newness. And the Maxima appeared to have a little rust, or something, behind the rear wheel. A lot of cars by that time had gone to that style where the rear quarter panel stopped at the rear bumper fascia level, and then the plastic fascia wrapped around, but the Maxima still held onto that older style, where the metal went all the way down to the bottom of the car.

    I always thought that style of Supra was nice...a bit smoother than the boxier '86 and earlier, but not so over-the-top as the '93 and later models. That generation of Maxima never did much for me, but I think that's mostly because I thought the '89-94 was a real looker, and a tough act to follow. Still, it seemed like a style that's aged nicely.

    Neither one is exactly a high-dollar collectible, although I guess there could be some market for that Supra? Still, it was kind of cool to see both of them still being used as daily transportation, and in rainy weather even.
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 38,842
    I am the opposite on the Toyota. I loved the mid 80's wedge style, and thought the 87 version was too big and bulbous.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    I think those Supras can have a little value if a turbo. Many of them were automatics. I knew a kid in high school who's dad had one - the kid wrapped it around a telephone pole (but was uninjured).,

    Saw a few this afternoon: 2x Saab 900 - 1 a pre-flush headlight Turbo, the other a GM era "Talladega", Volvo P1800, first gen Taurus, Bentley Arnage, running and driving Audi Allroad, first gen Lexus SC.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977
    I looked up the specs on Wikipedia, and they actually show the '87-91 as being slightly smaller in wheelbase and length, compared to the '82-86. However, the '87-91 was wider. They list two widths: 69.3" for the 3.0 model and 66.5 for all others. As far as I know, the US only got the 3.0 model. I wonder what they did to the car to alter the width that much? I'm sure it's more than just the placement of the mirrors, isn't it?

    For some reason, when I was a kid, I thought the '79-81 Supra was kind of an exotic looking car. When I look at the pics of them now, I don't see it quite as much, although I do still find it a handsome looking car. Perhaps one reason I liked it is that, for a Japanese car, it was actually a bit on the large side!
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    edited September 17
    RE.: The '80 Monte Carlo ab348 saw--my parents had a new '80 Monte Carlo. At the time, I thought the four-headlight styling was better than the '78 and '79, although I'm not so sure now. It was a dark green metallic, about the same color as an army uniform of the time. It had factory gold painted pinstripes, and the Exterior Decor Package which got you rocker trim the entire length of the car, and a beltline molding. It had Rally Wheels and looked nice, and '80 was the last year that every single Monte Carlo had 205-70 tires and F-41 suspension. I bought a new '81, which I thought was better-styled though.

    andre--did the Supra have the wheel opening flares? Not a fan of those. I think the Celica didn't have those though, right?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977
    I know I've mentioned it before, but I have a bit of a fascination with a lot of those late 70's/early 80's Japanese hardtop coupes. Stuff like the Datsun 200SX, the little hardtop coupe and liftback Toyota Corolla SR-5, the Dodge Challenger/Plymouth Sapporo. And the Mazda 626, which is one that never seemed all that common.

    Of course, admiring something from afar, and owning it are two different things. I wonder if I'd like owning something like one of these cars? I know it's a bit out of the normal range for me.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 23,977

    andre--did the Supra have the wheel opening flares? Not a fan of those. I think the Celica didn't have those though, right?

    If it did, they really didn't stand out to me. I just googled a few pics though...looks like it was the '82-86 style that had those plastic flares around the wheel openings.

    It pretty much looked like this, although I don't remember if it had the color keyed wheels or not. I thought about trying to get a pic of it, but there was a lot of traffic and it was starting to rain...




  • fintailfintail Posts: 51,407
    edited September 17
    I've always liked the Sapporo and rebadges (JDM Galant). But I much prefer the style without rear window louvers, like this:

    image

    This maybe more Americanized one popped up for sale on local CL several years ago. I think it was around 3K, and looked quite nice - maybe should have gone for it:

    image

    My uncle had a 200SX of the angular 80-83 style (not the funky astro-boy style prior model), but it was a hatchback. IIRC it didn't have a hardtop feature, but the notchback did,

    I also recall the 626, from my young memory. A woman down the street had a yellow Fox Mustang hatch, I think some kind of sport model maybe with t-tops. I was maybe 5 years old, and found that car to be pretty cool, I think I maybe even asked for a ride in it. One day it was gone, and she was driving a new 626 hardtop coupe, I still remember the "Luxus" badge. It didn't excite me.



  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 12,313
    You reminded me of the first 200SX--some things can't be unseen! If it were bigger it would be an extension of the cars Homer Simpson designed on the show!
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