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Ford Fusion/Mercury Milan

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Comments

  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    Price out 225 45R16 tires, review the less expensive ones, and you will quickly see, there isnt much choice in tires for a Sport. Also Unless you also purchase wheels and have Tire rack mount and balance, the tires you purchase still have to be mounted and balanced, and that can add up $50 depending on who will mount them for you. Second, if you have a warranty issue, you wont get any service from a local tire dealer, nor the place that mounted then for you. You have to deal with Tirerack.

    Yes the prices are good, provided you are buying the wheels too.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    edited January 2011
    I took up your challenge and after sorting the 59 choices at tire rack by price and concentrating on the all-season tires, found a Dunlop SP Sport Signature (W&Y) not too far down the list at $134 plus a $40 rebate on 4. Tire rack test conclusion was "An established tire that competes with some of the best".

    Also at $142 there is the Continental ExtremeContact DWS at $142. This tire is highly rated by both tire rack and CR.
  • mz6greyghostmz6greyghost Posts: 1,230
    edited January 2011
    I assume you mean 225/45-18s, since that's the size Tirerack has for a Sport.

    Besides the Dunlops mentioned above, I'd add the Yokohama Avids and Continental Extremecontact DWS as two excellent choices for a lower price.

    Let me also recommend shopping around at different tire stores as well. There are local tire shops that will MATCH Tireracks prices per tire (including the shop I've done business with for a decade now...), plus they only charge $9.95 per tire to mount/balance them as well. They also honor the warranties since you purchased them from the tire shop.

    Again, when it's all said and done, spending $200-250 per tire with everything included is simply insane.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    yes, the 18's. I priced out Cooper Zeon tires. Very good tires, excellent traction in all weather, rain and snow, and they also have low rolling resistance and high tread life. The $900 was from Farm & Fleet, and is a wee bit high, I just found the tires at sears, $797 + tax for all 4 wheels total.

    I have always had excellent results with Cooper, never had any experience with the other brands, and I tend to stick with what I know.

    I checked around, the Continentals, installed, $871.

    All the local stores that would mount YOUR tires that you brought in and did not purchase from will charge minimum $45 per tire, to mount and balance, and that does not include the TPMS hardware if needed. If they have to replace the valve stem they have to rebuild the TPMS, and that is an additional $13 per wheel.

    No matter what you do, these tires are going to cost up to $200 per wheel once all is said and done.
  • xmechxmech Posts: 90
    edited January 2011
    Do you mean just the fan on in defrost mode? No, if you have the front window defrost on, the compressor will work. And the compressor, unless there's something new and fancy in this one, is either an on or off affair. So the only energy difference in how much power it uses between A/C mode and defrost mode would be the cycle time, if there's any difference.

    I kind of miss my wife's 1984 Tercel's cabin controls. Easy to operate and find, and you turned on the compressor yourself if you wanted it.

    Oh, and I don't know about the auto temp controls since I don't have one. Never had one on any vehicle I owned. I assume it would be similar, being automatic.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    No matter what you do, these tires are going to cost up to $200 per wheel once all is said and done.

    I'd thought that the figure of $250 was given and I had assumed that was referring to just the cost of the tire. But if you had a more normal size tire on the Fusion, like the 17 inchers, it looks you'd only be paying about $20 or so less per tire for the same model tires.
  • Also Unless you also purchase wheels and have Tire rack mount and balance, the tires you purchase still have to be mounted and balanced, and that can add up $50 depending on who will mount them for you.

    I paid $80 to have my snow tires mounted on rims and balanced. That was comparable (and even less expensive) than the quote I received from Belle Tire and Discount Tire locally. The killer for me was neither place had the tire in stock and both wanted to charge shipping to get that tire.

    Second, if you have a warranty issue, you wont get any service from a local tire dealer, nor the place that mounted then for you. You have to deal with Tirerack.

    That isn't the case either. The warranty on a tire is good at any authorized reseller (allowing they were purchased from an authorized reseller).

    Ordering from TireRack, including mounting, balancing, and shipping, was $125-150 (not including the local places *shipping* charge) less than buying 4 Dunlop SP WinterSport 3D tires locally. And the place that did the mounting and balancing washed and vacuumed the car for free.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    Then you got lucky. The local places by me will not warranty a tire purchased from Tire rack even if they mounted it. They will take it off the rim for you, but you have to send it back to Tirerack to get it replaced. It all depends on finding a tire store that will do that for you. There are dealers who will accept tires shipped direct to them from Tire rack and deal with the customers when a tire needs warranty, but there aren't as many as one would think, once you find one, stick with them.

    I used to deal with tires for years, sold Coopers, and we would warranty a Cooper sold by someone else, but the customer still paid for mounting and balancing, but a customer who bought the tire from us and we installed them, would get full warranty, which included mounting and balancing. If someone brought in tires for us to mount and balance, we would, but they would be on their own for warranty, since we would not warranty them.

    I guess what I'm saying is if the tire dealer who is doing the mounting and balancing does not deal with the brand of tire that you purchased, you wont get warranty work from them, so buyer beware on the tire brand.
  • mz6greyghostmz6greyghost Posts: 1,230
    I guess what I'm saying is if the tire dealer who is doing the mounting and balancing does not deal with the brand of tire that you purchased, you wont get warranty work from them, so buyer beware on the tire brand.

    That's also not true. I bought Yokos through the local Gemini tire shop (which sells Goodyear, Dunlop, and Kelly), in which they got through Tirerack (and matched their price), and two weeks later, a sidewall blew on one of them due to a piece of construction debris. The tire shop replaced it under their treadwear/road hazard warranty, no cost.

    Not for nothing, but it seems the local tire shops around you just don't give a @#$% about customer service.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    edited January 2011
    My kid ordered tires from tire rack, had them delivered to our house, hauled them to Walmart for super cheap mounting and balancing. When the tires wore out prematurely (in only 6000 miles :surprise:) he got warranty replacements at sears with no problem at all.

    My understanding is tire manufacturer warranty does not cover mounting and balancing, I'm not aware of any shops that throw that in...so never considered that as a possibility.

    That said, for a number of reasons, I'd not do things the way my kid did, I strongly prefer to just get my tires from an independent shop about a mile from my house. With mounting, balancing, and delivery considered he costs about the same as using tire rack and I trust him to take care of me if there is a problem. (My kid may have done the same had he known, we only discovered what a bargain the local guy was on tires after his tirerack/walmart gambit)
  • With mounting, balancing, and delivery considered he costs about the same as using tire rack and I trust him to take care of me if there is a problem. (My kid may have done the same had he known, we only discovered what a bargain the local guy was on tires after his tirerack/walmart gambit)

    Yeah, I had "that guy" back home in Cali. He would beat deals, get me the tires I wanted, etc. I also had a suspension guy I liked. In SE MI I can't find a decent independent that carries any brands. Even "local" regional chains didn't seem to interested. I could have had Tire Rack drop ship the tires but had them come to my place instead. I really like supporting local businesses when I can, but I couldn't bring myself to pay a $150 extra for no better service. If you can't compete on price/service then you need to change your business model. Oh and I ordered the tires on Wed night and they were delivered Friday morning.
  • I recognize the many conveniences of using a number pad to unlock your car, but there's also a dark side: It's not too hard for somebody else to watch while you enter your code. The chances increase if you tend to park in the same place regularly, like a parking garage at work. Doesn't this bother any one else? :confuse:
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    it is rather easy to hide what you are doing when you punch it in, but for the most part it is used to lock the doors, or unlock the car if you leave the keys inside. It is a feature I would much rather have on the car than not. Besides, if someone really wants your car, or something in it, not knowing the code wont stop them. I would much rather they got in through the code rather than bust a window as I would only be out whatever they took, rather than what they took + a window.

    To combat theft, I don't leave anything in worth stealing.
  • podpod Posts: 176
    I think you have been watching too many Matt Damon movies. Keycodes for ATM, doorlocks, combination locks, laboratory entrance, realtors stow a key, etc. Stand in front of the array and shield all views (including the ones in the helicopters). I rather doubt anyone is going to spy on you for days to infer your code when BMW (break my window) is the American way. No, not worried.
  • Why bother breaking a window when all you need to do is press 5 numbers?

    Good luck filing an insurance claim when the police report says 'no signs of forced entry'.

    I really like the Fusion, but this is one feature I would not want to use.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    Who says you have to use it? Would you rather have Onstar with an additional monthly fee, and separate phone line that you have to pay for, just in case you happen to lock your keys in the car? Or would you rather have some other make of car where if you happen to lock the keys in, you have to call the locksmith, or would you rather have this keypad handy in the event you happened to drop your keys while getting out and couldn't catch the door in time? I rarely use it to gain entry, and am pretty sure I hide the keys when I do, and am so glad I have it for those rare times where the keys stay in the car.

    What you probably don't know about it, since you are so against it is, you can program a second code into it, and use that for gaining access, and change it randomly. That is exactly what I do, change it every so often, especially if I used it where people were watching. It takes all of 30 seconds to change the code.
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,019
    Ford has been using these keypads for at least 15 years and I've never heard anyone who had a break-in using the keypad. It just doesn't happen in real life.
  • From what I've read so far, SecuriCode is not necessarily intended for daily use, although you certainly could do that. It seems to be more of a convenience - you're on a bike ride and don't want to take your keys with you - or a backup - if you lock yourself out. I can certainly see taking advantage of SecuriCode in that way. I just wouldn't want to use it on a daily basis.

    "Chacqu'un a son gout."
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 8,019
    Correct - you don't use it when you have the keys (which is most of the time). It's used by others or when you don't want to keep the keys in your pocket. Once you've had it and used it you don't want to give it up.
  • podpod Posts: 176
    6 months and 7k miles and I continue to like the car very much. Averaging >30 mph mixed driving. My impression is that the car gets about 35 mpg on flat highway at 70 mph and about 25 mpg in residential situations. I don't do a lot of stop and go except commuting but mpg falls off to low twenties in that situation. Did well on snow (i.e. plowed but not clear streets). No major complaints, or for that matter, even minor complaints. I felt uncomfortable in the seats the first few days but there are sufficient adjusments so that I am very comfortable now. I assume that whatever is said about the Milan applies to the Fusion. For 20K (taxes and fees included) out the door I feel that I couldn't do much better. It doesn't at all feel like an econocar. Cancelled Sirius at the expiration of the free service; most of the channels were not of interest to me. Gave in and got a tracfone to use the synch features, for emergencies and for pizza orders on the way home from work.
  • podpod Posts: 176
    While washing the winter crud from my New England 2010 Milan I noticed that the forward portion of the rear wheel wells contain a "shelf" that is about a quart in capacity. It was filled half way with sand and other damp road debris that washed right out with a hose. The rest of the wheel wells are sealed by rubber flaps but the forward wells of the rear wheel wells do not have this feature. I would recommend that people be aware of this "storage bin" and keep it dry. I wonder whether it would become a source of rust in 4-5 years. I'm thinking of ways to fill it. Expandable foam insulation is my first idea but I have to consider whether that would trap a layer of water between the foam and the metal and make things worse. Ideas?
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    I wouldn't fill it, you will trap moisture and cause problems for sure. The most likely cause of rust is water trapped internally, between two sheets of metal as in the lower door, or rockers when the weep holes get plugged up, but if it is outside of the body where the paint covers the metal, it is less likely to cause a rust out. They put these cars through extreme conditions to accelerate rusting, and if it was a potential problem, they would have addressed it.
  • podpod Posts: 176
    Good point. Perhaps just slathering it with epoxy or a asphault like material would add some protection. It is a closed space and open to the air so it should self ventilate and dry after the wet road conditions do abate. Thanks for cautionary note..I agree.
  • cannon3cannon3 Posts: 296
    Vehicle now as 67,000 trouble free, rattle free miles. I did have to have my rear brake pads replaced. I put ceramic pads on. My front pads still had 80%!!!???. I also had my transmission fluid flushed. I am told I am going to have to get new tires in the next 2 months... so far a great car.
  • winter2winter2 Posts: 1,801
    edited April 2011
    I have a 2010 Milan Premier with Sync. When I first got it, everything worked except the voice command feature, which was deaf. :surprise: I took the car to the dealer and after some diagnostics, they replaced the radio and the microphone. Everything then worked fine until they moved the car and Sync went deaf again. :mad: I gave the car back to the dealer for almost two weeks. They did some diagnostic work by connecting the car to the internet and determined that the core unit for sync was broken. That was replaced and Sync was still deaf! :cry:

    This past Friday, a field engineer from Dearborn came in to evaluate the car and after hours of testing, determined that a wire was broken. Unfortunately, I do not know which one was broken but now everything works just fine. :shades:

    Overall, the car is very comfortable and economical. The four cylinder engine is perky and smooth and going back and forth to work in metro D.C. traffic has yielded fuel economy of 26 - 30 mpg (calculated).

    In July, trip to NYC is planned and we will be taking the Milan to see how it does on pure highway driving.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    Glad they were able to resolve it. Goes to show, it can always be the simplest thing to go wrong on these. Problem is, many of the new school techs lack the ability to be able troubleshoot old school. Too much reliance on computers and modules, too little knowledge of tracing wires and using meters. I'm an old school tech, worked on cars when they still had points(remember those), and you used a dwell meter to set the gap.

    These days, I'm afraid to touch a car, to add a radio, or trailer hookup, or anything that touches the electrical system, since putting in the wrong load, or resistance can blow up a module, or worse yet, the main computer.

    I have a 2010 Flex EB SEL that I am installing the factory hitch on, they have a kit for the trailer wiring, but does not include the connections for the 7 pin socket that includes the brake wiring, YET, under the dash is the connector for adding the brake controller. I need to obtain the wiring diagram so I can tap into that connection properly to use it, without breaking anything. At least they use color coded wires, imagine working on something where all the wiring is made with white wires.
  • winter2winter2 Posts: 1,801
    It took the dealer a good deal of effort and serious help from Dearborn to get this problem resolved.

    As to electrical issues, I have owned cars for many years and have had exceedingly few problems in that department. One I do remember was way back in the late 70's where a wire to the left rear brake light got pinched by a bolt causing a fault. I blew three or four fuses and then went to the dealer who found the problem in about twenty minutes.

    As to diagnosing issues, the use of computers to control most everything is both interesting and scary. If the computer fails, you are basically screwed. With the mandating of OBD, that has made fixing a problem harder. I also have a Jeep Liberty (2005) Limited CRD (diesel). If you cycle the ignition four times, the OBD codes show up at the odometer. The issue here is that the codes are wrong 90% of the time and you need a sophisticated scan tool connected to the OBD port to get the correct answer. Now tell me that isn't nuts!!!

    This is my first FoMoCo product in over thirty years and except for this issue, the car is really decent. Now let us see if it stays this way.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    I have 33K miles on my 2010 Fusion Sport, and not a single problem since I got it. You should be good with yours for a very long time.
  • cannon3cannon3 Posts: 296
    Flex is cool!! Seeing more of these around lately. A nice alternative to an SUV or station wagon.
    My 2006 Fusion SEL V6 has been a great vehicle. Just keep the maintenance up on yours and it should take you many miles.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    Dropped my Fusion off for warranty work before it runs out. Nothing big, just a skronk from the suspension bushings when you stop after so many miles. The drivers inside door panel squeaks when you pull on the handle to close it.
    Aside from those two little things, the car has been great the past 34000 miles.

    While I was there, I thought I would check out the new Explorer. Well it is nice, and for $47k it had damn well better be. Would I trade my Flex for one? No Definitely NO.
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