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Honda Ridgeline SUT

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Comments

  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,863
    I'm on my 4th heavy-duty truck and 2nd half-ton since 2001 and have yet to see one that didn't have all the wiring for a brake controller.

    I went to a number of manufacturer websites and the wiring for a brake controller was included only with the tow package. It wasn't standard.
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,241
    That's true, however the "wiring" consists of a harness that plugs in under the dash. All the hardwiring between front/hitch is already there, just plug the harness in the back and plug the harness up under the dash. There's actually only one wire necessary to run direct from the brake controller to the trailer, and I would be quite surprised if Honda didn't already have that wire in place. Well maybe not, I've noticed quite a few oddities with my Odyssey (is that a pun?).

    Edit: Based on the description here http://www.handa-accessories.com/ridgeline.html the Ridgeline is the same. The tow package includes the pigtail to plug-in for the brake controller.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,863
    The tow package includes the pigtail to plug-in for the brake controller.

    And that IMHO, is all that should be come from the factory. There's no need for the brake controller itself to come with the vehicle.
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,241
    I agree. Look around at all the pickups/SUV's that don't even have a hitch and it's clear most folks aren't towing, and even less are towing enough to require trailer brakes. A quality brake controller will run you several hundred dollars, which is big $$ on a light-duty truck. I'm all for it on the heavy-duty vehicles. I'm not happy with the mounting of any of my controllers, I'd much rather it be integrated.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    If you're towing over 1K, more than likely your owner's manual will say you need trailer brakes.

    Bob
  • That's one of the things about the Ford electronic brake controller that is so nice- the fact that it's integrated and actually looks like it belongs. Other trucks should at least be set up so that there is a good location where a controller could be mounted and have it not look tacked-on.

    Wow. I just criticized all trucks but the Super Duty, and not just the Ridgeline! ;)
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    I couldn't agree more. Why electronic brake controllers are not part of a factory tow package is crazy. My hat is off to Ford for doing this. I just hope other truck and SUV makers pick up on their great idea, and offer that feature too.

    If I'm to be critical of Ford at all here, is that they "only" offer this feature on their Super Duty models, and not across their entire truck/SUV range.

    Bob
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,241
    My current 1/2 ton says anything over 2,000# requires trailer brakes. That's a CYA number if you ask me, though.
  • The numbers that the manufacturers rate for towing are that way. It leaves some leeway for safety (a LOT of it, in my experience). I towed a fully-gassed and wife stuffed 2004 Malibu sedan weighing in at a minimum of 4000 lbs. behind the Trailblazer LT 4WD i6 that was rated at a maximum tow of ~5800lbs. The car was on one of the U-Haul 2 wheel tow dollies. This was without a brake controller (those U-Haul dollies don't even have brakes of any sort either). I had no problems at all with this setup, so I'm sure that 2000lbs. behind my Chevy Silverado 1500 has to be CYA. :P
  • I use to tow an 18 foot runabout boat with my '95 Explorer. No trailer brakes. No problems. But if I had done it every other weekend through the mountains from, say, SoCal to the Colorado river, brakes probably would have been wise.

    Anyway, I still think the tow package (hitch and wiring) is overpriced on the RL. I could see a couple hundred bucks, but over $500 is too much.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    You must have a GM full-size truck, right? They are one of the rare exceptions.

    Bob
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,241
    My 1/2 ton is an '03 Silverado. I also have two Dodge heavy-dutys. I'm curious what the manuals say for their brake requirements. I had the wiring malfunction once with my 15,000# trailer in tow and the one-ton stopped it quite well actually. The hitch company that installed my goose-neck did a real knock-up job on the wiring :mad:
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    Current Ram trucks have a 1000 pound unbraked tow limit, at least last year they did, as I checked the owner's manual.

    Bob
  • varmintvarmint Posts: 6,326
    Lots of vehicles will tow a heavy load without trailer brakes under normal circumstances. It's when the circumstances get weird that the brakes are required. A ball rolls across the road... you hit a patch of ice and the truck gets a little sideways... Those are the times when the brakes are necessary.
  • Ridgline owners,

    I have an F150, but want more comfort for the backseat occupants. Looking at Edmunds numbers for Ridgeline Cargo space at 9 cu. feet!? makes me think the bed is very tiny?

    Am I better off with the Pilot for cargo space?
    I occasionally haul things like a pressure washer and carpenter tools - just how much will the Ridgeline hold?
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,241
    I'm sure that's an inside cargo space number. The bed is small, but it'll hold a lot more than that. I'm going for a Tundra Double-cab myself, but I need to fit a 4wheeler in the back and don't want the tailgate down.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    I think you need to check it out for yourself, as I think only you can answer those questions.

    Bob
  • varmintvarmint Posts: 6,326
    Not sure how Edmunds got that number. 8.5 cu.ft. is the volume of the trunk under the bed. Maybe that's what they're listing.

    The bed in the Ridgeline is only 5' long. Typical for a crew cab pickup, but that's not saying much. The bed is wider than any other mid-size at 49".

    Toyota offers a 6.5' optional bed for the double cab Tacoma, but I didn't find the rear seat in the Taco to be all that comfortable.

    I think your best bet is to follow Bob's advice and go check one out in person.
  • I'll take you're advice and check out the Ridgeline in person.

    while hauling kids in the back of the F150 they sit really low where they can't see out the front - and get car sick easy. Anyone have experience driving kids in the back of the Ridgeline on long road trips?
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I have only directly compared a Ridgeline to a late-model Dodge Ram (94-01?)...HUGE difference in back seat room and positioning. The Ridgeline sits like the Pilot inside, IMO.
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 25,942
    the 9 cu. ft. is definitely not the bed, as others have stated. Obviously, if the bed is 5' long by 4' wide, that's 20 feet right there. multiply by the height for the cubic feet. So even 1 foot high (and we know its more than that) would give you 20 cu. ft.

    aspesisteve - You might also consider a Pilot. Its up to you and what you want to do. Do you need an enclosed cargo area? Will you ever need a 3rd row of seats? I easily hauled a pressure washer, push mower, and radial arm saw all in my Pilot at once (with one side of the 2nd row still in the up position), and could have easily stuck more tools in there.

    '18 BMW 330xi; '67 Coronet R/T; '14 Town&Country Limited; '18 BMW X2. 47-car history and counting!

  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    http://blogs.edmunds.com/.ee8f1ad

    I guess sometimes a vehicle maker can be too clever. ;)

    Bob
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    That article is kind of funny. I would love that much storage!
  • varmintvarmint Posts: 6,326
    Give Karl some credit for making himself appear a bit "buffoonish" to entertain the readers. :D
  • nowakj66nowakj66 Posts: 709
    Check out the Dodge Rampage concept from Chicago. Talk about a Ridgeline rip off!
  • varmintvarmint Posts: 6,326
    Or Ford boasting about the IRS underpinning the next SportTrac.

    Although they do have compartments in the walls of the bed. At least one of them is big enough to fit a six pack. (ooooh... ahhhh... ohhhhh) :P
  • c'mon guys, I am sure the first guy to shoot a jump shot in the NBA was ridiculed too. And the second guy was especially lame because it wasn't his idea.

    I am happy that Ford is getting it right with IRS. I just wish GM would follow suit.

    John
  • (If this is misplaced, just say so...)

    I've been trying to figure out what kind of drive train the Ridgeline has, but haven't had any luck.

    It *sounds* like it uses the Honda full-time AWD system, and that there isn't a conventional 4Hi-4Lo-2Hi selector. Is that correct?

    A sales guy said you could kind of force it into 4Lo by turning off something like ABS, but I never trust the guys in the ties...

    Can someone toss me a clue? :)
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,863
    It *sounds* like it uses the Honda full-time AWD system, and that there isn't a conventional 4Hi-4Lo-2Hi selector. Is that correct?

    If I understand it correctly, it is FWD until slippage is detected and then power is routed to the rear wheels. There isn't a conventional 4hi-4lo-2hi selector.

    A sales guy said you could kind of force it into 4Lo by turning off something like ABS, but I never trust the guys in the ties...

    There is a VTM-Lock option that locks the rear wheels to provide addtional traction on loose surfaces. It stays activated up to 18 MPH.
  • rshollandrsholland Posts: 19,788
    It's a (mostly) on-demand AWD, with no low range. It cruises in FWD mode, but engages the rear wheels upon acceleration.

    The sales guy doesn't have a clue.

    Bob
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