Chronic Car Buyers Anonymous

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  • stickguystickguy Member Posts: 41,734
    I sat in one last year when at dealer to test drive the XT4. It was certainly nice inside. But big.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaMember Posts: 15,004
    edited October 2020
    tjc78 said:

    Anyone have any seat time in an XT6? It is kind of an oddball in the GM line. It is bigger than the Acadia or XT5 (same wheelbase) but a little smaller than the Enclave and Traverse.

    Reviews aren't spectacular but I like the looks and based on a quick look the MF's look mighty attractive along with $2000 GM loyalty.

    I had one as a service loaner for a day, white over black. On the plus side it didn't drive anywhere near as barge-like as I expected, and was very smooth and comfortable. It wasn't exactly nimble but it wasn't bad, and drove smaller than I expected. The latest iteration of CUE is very straightforward. It had the same 3.6 V6 that GM uses in everything so it wasn't blazing fast but was better in that department than I expected, probably due to the transmission. I like the looks of the XT6 much more than the XT5.

    On the downside, I didn't think it was worth anywhere near the sticker price unless you could get a huge discount. I might have felt differently if it had different colors inside and out. But big discounts often happen on Caddys, especially this time of year.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyMember Posts: 12,019
    Once we are in the new house I'm going to check one out. Wife said she liked it, so that's a plus.

    I'm looking at a fairly basic one (not a Sport). They seem to come in a little under 60k and are still really equipped. An Enclave Avenir is 60K as is a modestly equipped T6 XC90.

    2020 Volvo XC90 T6 Momentum / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 14,793
    tjc78 said:

    Anyone have any seat time in an XT6? It is kind of an oddball in the GM line. It is bigger than the Acadia or XT5 (same wheelbase) but a little smaller than the Enclave and Traverse.

    Reviews aren't spectacular but I like the looks and based on a quick look the MF's look mighty attractive along with $2000 GM loyalty.

    A Cadillac'd version of the Traverse? The apple doesn't fall far from the tree! You know what works for you, so if the #s look good, then what's not to like?
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaMember Posts: 15,004
    Looks like Honda has cleaned up the front end of the Accord a bit for 2021.


    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • stickguystickguy Member Posts: 41,734
    looks pretty similar to me. I did see a preview on the facelifted Ridgeline. That looks a lot different

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • qbrozenqbrozen Member Posts: 29,105
    Oh boy. Service advisor called this eve. They have a laundry lost of things, most should be undef warranty. He is going to call in morn for approval. I couldn’t hear him clearly because he caught me in the car, but I heard control arms bushings, timing cover leak, some kind of steering leak, and some kind of coolant leak, I believe. As for the electrical gremlins that I thought was likely all one connector since they started at the same time, they say are 3 different things. Some kind of speed sensor in the steering wheel for the cruise, the seat control switch, and the passenger seat belt.

    I am doubting control arm bushings would be covered but he seems to think so. The one thing on his list not covered were brakes. He quoted me $900, to which I said I’d take care of those myself.

    69,400 miles, for those curious. I’m anxious to see the receipt. Could very well be this is the trip that makes the warranty worth it. My son was asking about the warranty. I tried to explain it but he can’t comprehend what “lifetime” means for a car. Lol.

    ‘21 Camaro LT1, '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '13 Fiat 500c, '14 Town&Country Limited. 54-car history and counting!

  • stickguystickguy Member Posts: 41,734
    annoyed today at the VW dealer (which is already absurdly expensive for normal service). Kid had to take the Jetta in for the 40K service, which they warned was expensive (even more than the last one which was high). So I actually stopped in last week to find out what it included (and of course, look at a GTI...) and told the guy what they were going to do that did not need to happen. Which was cabin filter (we did that ourselves) and brake fluid change (since they did that at the 30K service, about 9 months ago). So I pointed that out to the (not very bright) service writer who supposedly adjusted the appointment.

    Kid knew this morning when she took it in to make sure they knew not to do the filter (which they of course forgot was not needed, so good thing she reminded them) but she had no clue about the brake fluid. I forgot to remind her, but also (incorrectly) assumed they were smart enough to know that it was just done. Nope.

    so they call her late today (4:30) saying it was done, and gave her a ridiculous amount due. And said service was open until 6. So I assumed they screwed up and went with her to be "the heavy" (IOW the person yelling at them if needed). got there at 5:30, to find out all the service department people leave at 5, and only a cashier was there until 6:00. who of course could do nothing, and said there was no one in the complex (3 dealers) who could adjust the bill. So either pay it as is, or come back tomorrow during the normal work day hours. figuring it is easier to get resolved when they don't already have the money, back into the loaner car and home, with a trip back at lunch tomorrow.

    very annoying. But I told the princess to be prepared to start crying if they try to play hardball because we will be filming and she will be going viral! So if you see a short blond girl in a VW service department trending on twitter rampage, that will be her!

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • stickguystickguy Member Posts: 41,734
    qbrozen said:

    Oh boy. Service advisor called this eve. They have a laundry lost of things, most should be undef warranty. He is going to call in morn for approval. I couldn’t hear him clearly because he caught me in the car, but I heard control arms bushings, timing cover leak, some kind of steering leak, and some kind of coolant leak, I believe. As for the electrical gremlins that I thought was likely all one connector since they started at the same time, they say are 3 different things. Some kind of speed sensor in the steering wheel for the cruise, the seat control switch, and the passenger seat belt.

    I am doubting control arm bushings would be covered but he seems to think so. The one thing on his list not covered were brakes. He quoted me $900, to which I said I’d take care of those myself.

    69,400 miles, for those curious. I’m anxious to see the receipt. Could very well be this is the trip that makes the warranty worth it. My son was asking about the warranty. I tried to explain it but he can’t comprehend what “lifetime” means for a car. Lol.

    ouch. Sounds like a list from the Car Wizard on Hoovies latest purchase. And also why I probably should not be buying a cheaper used car private sale, at least not without a serious PPI done.

    I did mention one of the recent cars and bids cars (the 2015 ATS 6 speed) that went for a good price, and how that could be an option eventually. Her response was, "but it's used. I like new cars". If I have to buy new to make her happy, I guess I will! Not that she would know the difference between new and a pretty new service loaner or CPO unit.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 14,793
    stickguy said:

    If I have to buy new to make her happy, I guess I will!

    Wait, are you talking about the wife now, or still the daughter? I don't see any reason at all that you would have to make the daughter happy.... :D
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTMember Posts: 14,675
    qbrozen said:

    Oh boy. Service advisor called this eve. They have a laundry lost of things, most should be undef warranty. He is going to call in morn for approval. I couldn’t hear him clearly because he caught me in the car, but I heard control arms bushings, timing cover leak, some kind of steering leak, and some kind of coolant leak, I believe. As for the electrical gremlins that I thought was likely all one connector since they started at the same time, they say are 3 different things. Some kind of speed sensor in the steering wheel for the cruise, the seat control switch, and the passenger seat belt.

    I am doubting control arm bushings would be covered but he seems to think so. The one thing on his list not covered were brakes. He quoted me $900, to which I said I’d take care of those myself.

    69,400 miles, for those curious. I’m anxious to see the receipt. Could very well be this is the trip that makes the warranty worth it. My son was asking about the warranty. I tried to explain it but he can’t comprehend what “lifetime” means for a car. Lol.

    That is quite the laundry list of issues. The lifetime warranty is bumper to bumper?

    2001 Prelude Type SH, 2017 Pilot Touring AWD, 2019 Tacoma TRD Sport 4WD

  • corvettecorvette United StatesMember Posts: 8,412
    qbrozen said:

    I tried to explain it but he can’t comprehend what “lifetime” means for a car. Lol.

    From the sound of it, Chrysler wasn't thinking about what it meant when they wrote it, either.
  • corvettecorvette United StatesMember Posts: 8,412
    stickguy said:


    ouch. Sounds like a list from the Car Wizard on Hoovies latest purchase.

    I really like the thoroughness of the Car Wizard... If I lived in that area, I wouldn't mind going there and paying whatever their retail price is for an oil change, because I know they will actually look over everything instead of trying to get it out the door as quickly as possible.
  • qbrozenqbrozen Member Posts: 29,105
    I'd have to pull out the original literature. I know the coverage was very comprehensive, but I was (at the time) focusing on things I actually worried about such as all the electronics (doors, seats, RES, nav, etc), which it does cover.

    ‘21 Camaro LT1, '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '13 Fiat 500c, '14 Town&Country Limited. 54-car history and counting!

  • qbrozenqbrozen Member Posts: 29,105
    Huh. Lookit that. The overview does mention suspension.

    Lifetime Maximum Care — provides prolonged and complete mechanical coverage beyond the vehicle's factory warranty, including coverage for Luxury and Power Group components:
    Engine
    Transmission
    Driveline
    Steering
    Electrical/Expanded Electrical
    Power Group
    Air Conditioning
    Engine Cooling and Fuel System
    Front/Rear Suspension
    Brakes/Antilock Brakes
    Instrumentation
    Luxury Group
    Body Mechanisms
    Manual Interior Mechanisms
    Safety and Security

    Including:
    Heated Seats and Steering Wheels
    Power Liftgate Motors
    Power Sliding Door Motors
    Navigation Systems
    Factory-installed Remote Start Systems
    In-Vehicle Wireless Charging Stations
    Backup Assist Cameras and much more!

    ‘21 Camaro LT1, '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '13 Fiat 500c, '14 Town&Country Limited. 54-car history and counting!

  • 28firefighter28firefighter Seattle, WAMember Posts: 7,678
    So what isn’t included? Seems like you could keep a car running forever.
    2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited, 2007 BMW 530xi Touring 6MT (on loan), 2004 BMW 330i ZHP 6MT
  • corvettecorvette United StatesMember Posts: 8,412
    Is it transferable, or is that how they get out of paying on most of them since they are usually on at least their second or third owner once they reach hooptie status?
  • qbrozenqbrozen Member Posts: 29,105

    So what isn’t included? Seems like you could keep a car running forever.

    that's the idea!

    but, in case it is not remembered: FCA has an "out" in that they can choose to purchase the vehicle from us in lieu of repair.

    ‘21 Camaro LT1, '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '13 Fiat 500c, '14 Town&Country Limited. 54-car history and counting!

  • stickguystickguy Member Posts: 41,734
    was it transferrable? If not, they most likely know that many (most?) people will get tired and sell instead of milking the warranty forever. Plus as noted, they just have to say the hooptie is only worth $1,500 at some point and keep it instead of replacing a blown tranny.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • 28firefighter28firefighter Seattle, WAMember Posts: 7,678
    Depends - how do they value the vehicle at that point?
    2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited, 2007 BMW 530xi Touring 6MT (on loan), 2004 BMW 330i ZHP 6MT
  • stickguystickguy Member Posts: 41,734
    I would assume, as low as possible or however they want. Maybe blue book trade?

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTMember Posts: 14,675
    qbrozen said:

    Huh. Lookit that. The overview does mention suspension.

    Lifetime Maximum Care — provides prolonged and complete mechanical coverage beyond the vehicle's factory warranty, including coverage for Luxury and Power Group components:
    Engine
    Transmission
    Driveline
    Steering
    Electrical/Expanded Electrical
    Power Group
    Air Conditioning
    Engine Cooling and Fuel System
    Front/Rear Suspension
    Brakes/Antilock Brakes
    Instrumentation
    Luxury Group
    Body Mechanisms
    Manual Interior Mechanisms
    Safety and Security

    Including:
    Heated Seats and Steering Wheels
    Power Liftgate Motors
    Power Sliding Door Motors
    Navigation Systems
    Factory-installed Remote Start Systems
    In-Vehicle Wireless Charging Stations
    Backup Assist Cameras and much more!

    Impressive to say the least. They are standing behind it too. You have 66K miles you said? It’s paid off? And your wife likes it! Does it require you to keep impeccable service records?

    2001 Prelude Type SH, 2017 Pilot Touring AWD, 2019 Tacoma TRD Sport 4WD

  • nyccarguynyccarguy Stamford, CTMember Posts: 14,675
    That white, automatic Prelude went for $8,600 on Cars & Bids.

    2001 Prelude Type SH, 2017 Pilot Touring AWD, 2019 Tacoma TRD Sport 4WD

  • qbrozenqbrozen Member Posts: 29,105
    edited October 2020
    69k miles

    Works the same as the factory warranty as for care and feeding. We always go to same dealer we bought it from. I’m sure there are value rules written out somewhere, but it would have to be the value of it as if it were fixed.

    I think of it this way: odds are it will never be worth less than $2500 before a repair will exceed that value, which is about what we paid for the warranty, including tax and interest. So, at some point, if we still have it by that time, they’ll buy it from us for what the warranty cost. That means all repairs up to then were covered with no additional expense to us.

    ‘21 Camaro LT1, '07 ML63, '08 Charger R/T Daytona; '67 Coronet R/T; '13 Fiat 500c, '14 Town&Country Limited. 54-car history and counting!

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Member Posts: 17,849
    qbrozen said:

    Oh boy. Service advisor called this eve. They have a laundry lost of things, most should be undef warranty. He is going to call in morn for approval. I couldn’t hear him clearly because he caught me in the car, but I heard control arms bushings, timing cover leak, some kind of steering leak, and some kind of coolant leak, I believe. As for the electrical gremlins that I thought was likely all one connector since they started at the same time, they say are 3 different things. Some kind of speed sensor in the steering wheel for the cruise, the seat control switch, and the passenger seat belt.

    I am doubting control arm bushings would be covered but he seems to think so. The one thing on his list not covered were brakes. He quoted me $900, to which I said I’d take care of those myself.

    69,400 miles, for those curious. I’m anxious to see the receipt. Could very well be this is the trip that makes the warranty worth it. My son was asking about the warranty. I tried to explain it but he can’t comprehend what “lifetime” means for a car. Lol.

    Chrysler must buy bushings from the bargain bin as they went bad on the PT Cruiser at unusually low milage (maybe 40k). Strangely, the old Sebring with 85k miles hasn’t had that problem, knock on wood.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Member Posts: 17,849
    nyccarguy said:

    That white, automatic Prelude went for $8,600 on Cars & Bids.

    The Lebanon went for $5192. About twice what it was worth IMO. People do seem to get caught up in the spirit of bidding I guess.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyMember Posts: 12,019

    nyccarguy said:

    That white, automatic Prelude went for $8,600 on Cars & Bids.

    The Lebanon went for $5192. About twice what it was worth IMO. People do seem to get caught up in the spirit of bidding I guess.
    Someone wanted a really nice one and was willing to pay for it. Also, probably cheaper than trying to fix one up.

    2020 Volvo XC90 T6 Momentum / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • tjc78tjc78 South JerseyMember Posts: 12,019

    qbrozen said:

    Oh boy. Service advisor called this eve. They have a laundry lost of things, most should be undef warranty. He is going to call in morn for approval. I couldn’t hear him clearly because he caught me in the car, but I heard control arms bushings, timing cover leak, some kind of steering leak, and some kind of coolant leak, I believe. As for the electrical gremlins that I thought was likely all one connector since they started at the same time, they say are 3 different things. Some kind of speed sensor in the steering wheel for the cruise, the seat control switch, and the passenger seat belt.

    I am doubting control arm bushings would be covered but he seems to think so. The one thing on his list not covered were brakes. He quoted me $900, to which I said I’d take care of those myself.

    69,400 miles, for those curious. I’m anxious to see the receipt. Could very well be this is the trip that makes the warranty worth it. My son was asking about the warranty. I tried to explain it but he can’t comprehend what “lifetime” means for a car. Lol.

    Chrysler must buy bushings from the bargain bin as they went bad on the PT Cruiser at unusually low milage (maybe 40k). Strangely, the old Sebring with 85k miles hasn’t had that problem, knock on wood.
    Heavy FWD van with a big V6... I'm not totally surprised about it. The bushings probably aren't totally shot just getting worn and since Q has the warranty the dealer is pushing the repair through to pocket the $$.

    2020 Volvo XC90 T6 Momentum / 2019 Volvo S60 T6 Inscription

  • au1994au1994 GAMember Posts: 2,090
    tjc78 said:

    nyccarguy said:

    That white, automatic Prelude went for $8,600 on Cars & Bids.

    The Lebanon went for $5192. About twice what it was worth IMO. People do seem to get caught up in the spirit of bidding I guess.
    Someone wanted a really nice one and was willing to pay for it. Also, probably cheaper than trying to fix one up.
    That’s a pretty good way to look at it. That example was in great shape and you could easily hit that figure buying and bringing one up to snuff. Especially if you are not turning your own wrench.

    2008 Toyota Land Cruiser White over Tan
    2017 BMW X1 Jet Black over Mocha

  • stickguystickguy Member Posts: 41,734
    My theory on it. Much cheaper to buy a car done usually than it is to restore one.

    2020 Acura RDX tech SH-AWD

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaMember Posts: 15,004
    tjc78 said:


    Heavy FWD van with a big V6... I'm not totally surprised about it. The bushings probably aren't totally shot just getting worn and since Q has the warranty the dealer is pushing the repair through to pocket the $$.

    When I had my Intrigue the dealer replaced front control arm bushings twice under warranty. I had never noticed a problem or heard a sound from there, so never even mentioned it either time. I figured when they called to say they were replacing them under warranty that it was a warranty scam.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • au1994au1994 GAMember Posts: 2,090
    edited October 2020
    Just got this from Costco. Good through Jan. 4.


    $1,000 off Chevrolet Blazer, Colorado, Silverado 1500/2500/3500, Suburban, Tahoe, Traverse and Trailblazer

    $1,000 off Buick Encore GX and Enclave

    $1,000 off GMC Acadia, Canyon, Sierra 1500/2500/3500, Yukon and Yukon XL

    $1,250 off Volvo XC40, XC60 and XC90

    $3,000 off Chevrolet Bolt EV

    I’ve certainly seen better, especially on the Volvos. If you can couple the GM offers with any others that might be attractive.

    2008 Toyota Land Cruiser White over Tan
    2017 BMW X1 Jet Black over Mocha

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Member Posts: 17,849
    edited October 2020
    stickguy said:

    My theory on it. Much cheaper to buy a car done usually than it is to restore one.

    Very true. I once got that advice directly from the guy on American Pickers. Still, I wouldn’t pay $5200 for a car like that, particularly since it was starting to have convertible top issues. Someone who had a real soft spot for that particular car might not care.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoModerator Posts: 183,397
    I know I've mentioned my mom's car on this thread before - 2003 Hyundai Sonata GLS V6, with only 40K on it.

    My sister has taken possession of it and has had her local mechanic look things over. He proclaimed it was in pretty good condition.

    There were, however, a few issues that we felt was best handled by the dealer - the cruise control wasn't working, and there was a problem with the fuel filler neck that prevented gas from the nozzle to flow at a regular rate. The car is at the dealer now, and they are claiming that the timing belt needs to be replaced on top of the work we've already authorized.

    Dealer says it should be changed every 5 years or 60,000 miles, so technically, it should have been changed 3 times by now. They want to charge $795 for the work - but, this does not include replacing the water pump.

    My sister called her independent guy today, and he says that we he looked over the car a couple months back, he didn't see anything wrong with the belt that would require it to be replaced. When asked, he quoted $1000 for both the timing belt and water pump replacement.

    So, do we:
    1. Do nothing
    2. Replace the belt only
    3. Replace the belt and water pump

    At some point in the near future, I'm going to collect the car and bring it back to Colorado, and I'm leaning to either (1) or (3), but wanted to ping the expertise here at CCBA for your opinions. No comments along the lines of why we're investing so much into a car that's worth so little - that ship has sailed, and we're OK with spending the money to keep it running.

    Thanks!

    Edmunds Lease Calculator
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    MODERATOR

    2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • corvettecorvette United StatesMember Posts: 8,412
    If you do #3, do the tensioner as well. That is what nearly grenaded the engine on my dad’s TDI Beetle.
  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoModerator Posts: 183,397
    corvette said:

    If you do #3, do the tensioner as well. That is what nearly grenaded the engine on my dad’s TDI Beetle.

    Got it! Thanks for the advice.

    Edmunds Lease Calculator
    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and let us know! Post a pic of your new purchase or lease!


    MODERATOR

    2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 14,793
    edited October 2020
    Yeah, belt change should also include tensioner change, and it shouldn't change the price (except for the part, if it doesn't come with the belt in a kit).

    TBH, the schedule for timing belt replacements is usually on the "very safe" side of the spectrum. However, 17+ years on the original belt (I assume) is certainly pushing it. If you want the car to keep running (and, hopefully, well), then this is a necessary outlay. It must be rather labor intensive for $1000.... but that's the DIY in my speaking.

    Plus, it will be good for the car to have new coolant in the lines... maybe even new radiator hoses if you get spunky (again, should be a zero-labor item, and cost on those is pretty minimal).

    And, water pump as preventative? I think I would need to see it to decide. It doesn't hurt to put a new on, by any means, but the cost seems steep unless the part is really spendy. If you do the pump, though, a new thermostat should go without saying. Again, a zero labor item with all the other work being done..
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoModerator Posts: 183,397
    xwesx said:

    Yeah, belt change should also include tensioner change, and it shouldn't change the price (except for the part, if it doesn't come with the belt in a kit).

    TBH, the schedule for timing belt replacements is usually on the "very safe" side of the spectrum. However, 17+ years on the original belt (I assume) is certainly pushing it. If you want the car to keep running (and, hopefully, well), then this is a necessary outlay. It must be rather labor intensive for $1000.... but that's the DIY in my speaking.

    Plus, it will be good for the car to have new coolant in the lines... maybe even new radiator hoses if you get spunky (again, should be a zero-labor item, and cost on those is pretty minimal).

    My sister's mechanic inspected all the hoses and proclaimed them in good shape. This is a mechanic my sister trusts, as her FIL entrusted a series of Cadillacs to him over the years.

    Edmunds Lease Calculator
    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and let us know! Post a pic of your new purchase or lease!


    MODERATOR

    2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaMember Posts: 14,793
    edited October 2020
    Michaell said:



    My sister's mechanic inspected all the hoses and proclaimed them in good shape. This is a mechanic my sister trusts, as her FIL entrusted a series of Cadillacs to him over the years.

    Great! Then no need to push the issue. Those hoses can last a very long time, or they can deteriorate on the inside within ten years or so... visually, they look fine, but if they get thin spots in the walls, they can burst or collapse, and neither is good for coolant flow. An inspection (with some physical contact to check the integrity) should quickly tell a mechanic which is which.
    2018 Subaru Crosstrek, 2014 Audi Q7 TDI, 2013 Subaru Forester, 1969 Chevrolet C20, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250
  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Member Posts: 17,849
    edited October 2020
    Michaell said:

    I know I've mentioned my mom's car on this thread before - 2003 Hyundai Sonata GLS V6, with only 40K on it.

    My sister has taken possession of it and has had her local mechanic look things over. He proclaimed it was in pretty good condition.

    There were, however, a few issues that we felt was best handled by the dealer - the cruise control wasn't working, and there was a problem with the fuel filler neck that prevented gas from the nozzle to flow at a regular rate. The car is at the dealer now, and they are claiming that the timing belt needs to be replaced on top of the work we've already authorized.

    Dealer says it should be changed every 5 years or 60,000 miles, so technically, it should have been changed 3 times by now. They want to charge $795 for the work - but, this does not include replacing the water pump.

    My sister called her independent guy today, and he says that we he looked over the car a couple months back, he didn't see anything wrong with the belt that would require it to be replaced. When asked, he quoted $1000 for both the timing belt and water pump replacement.

    So, do we:
    1. Do nothing
    2. Replace the belt only
    3. Replace the belt and water pump

    At some point in the near future, I'm going to collect the car and bring it back to Colorado, and I'm leaning to either (1) or (3), but wanted to ping the expertise here at CCBA for your opinions. No comments along the lines of why we're investing so much into a car that's worth so little - that ship has sailed, and we're OK with spending the money to keep it running.

    Thanks!

    Is it going to be a long term car for you? If yes I’d have it done. If it’s going to be an occasional spare vehicle I’d say no, by the time anything fails the car won’t be worth anything anyway. It’s a $2500 car PP according to Edmunds. Drive it until it blows up.

    I had the same decision on the Sebring a while back and I decided given the less than 2000 miles a year I drive it not to spend the $1000 to do the belt/pump. My car is 3 years older than yours and twice the milage.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

  • au1994au1994 GAMember Posts: 2,090
    Belt and tensioner, yes. 40k on a water pump should be nothing and you could do it the next time you do the belt. Definitely have the other rubber bits checked. With that low of miles it obviously did some sitting which isn’t good for most of the parts on a car.

    2008 Toyota Land Cruiser White over Tan
    2017 BMW X1 Jet Black over Mocha

  • omarmanomarman Member Posts: 2,702
    I like option #1. Just drive it. Use it up. Park anywhere you want.
    image
    A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing.
  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoModerator Posts: 183,397

    Michaell said:

    I know I've mentioned my mom's car on this thread before - 2003 Hyundai Sonata GLS V6, with only 40K on it.

    My sister has taken possession of it and has had her local mechanic look things over. He proclaimed it was in pretty good condition.

    There were, however, a few issues that we felt was best handled by the dealer - the cruise control wasn't working, and there was a problem with the fuel filler neck that prevented gas from the nozzle to flow at a regular rate. The car is at the dealer now, and they are claiming that the timing belt needs to be replaced on top of the work we've already authorized.

    Dealer says it should be changed every 5 years or 60,000 miles, so technically, it should have been changed 3 times by now. They want to charge $795 for the work - but, this does not include replacing the water pump.

    My sister called her independent guy today, and he says that we he looked over the car a couple months back, he didn't see anything wrong with the belt that would require it to be replaced. When asked, he quoted $1000 for both the timing belt and water pump replacement.

    So, do we:
    1. Do nothing
    2. Replace the belt only
    3. Replace the belt and water pump

    At some point in the near future, I'm going to collect the car and bring it back to Colorado, and I'm leaning to either (1) or (3), but wanted to ping the expertise here at CCBA for your opinions. No comments along the lines of why we're investing so much into a car that's worth so little - that ship has sailed, and we're OK with spending the money to keep it running.

    Thanks!

    Is it going to be a long term car for you? If yes I’d have it done. If it’s going to be an occasional spare vehicle I’d say no, by the time anything fails the car won’t be worth anything anyway. It’s a $2500 car PP according to Edmunds. Drive it until it blows up.

    I had the same decision on the Sebring a while back and I decided given the less than 2000 miles a year I drive it not to spend the $1000 to do the belt/pump. My car is 3 years older than yours and twice the milage.
    Define long term - the first order of business is to drive it 1100 miles to Colorado, at which point I may put 3-6k on it a year. Truly a spare third car.

    Edmunds Lease Calculator
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    MODERATOR

    2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • au1994au1994 GAMember Posts: 2,090
    Michaell said:

    Michaell said:

    I know I've mentioned my mom's car on this thread before - 2003 Hyundai Sonata GLS V6, with only 40K on it.

    My sister has taken possession of it and has had her local mechanic look things over. He proclaimed it was in pretty good condition.

    There were, however, a few issues that we felt was best handled by the dealer - the cruise control wasn't working, and there was a problem with the fuel filler neck that prevented gas from the nozzle to flow at a regular rate. The car is at the dealer now, and they are claiming that the timing belt needs to be replaced on top of the work we've already authorized.

    Dealer says it should be changed every 5 years or 60,000 miles, so technically, it should have been changed 3 times by now. They want to charge $795 for the work - but, this does not include replacing the water pump.

    My sister called her independent guy today, and he says that we he looked over the car a couple months back, he didn't see anything wrong with the belt that would require it to be replaced. When asked, he quoted $1000 for both the timing belt and water pump replacement.

    So, do we:
    1. Do nothing
    2. Replace the belt only
    3. Replace the belt and water pump

    At some point in the near future, I'm going to collect the car and bring it back to Colorado, and I'm leaning to either (1) or (3), but wanted to ping the expertise here at CCBA for your opinions. No comments along the lines of why we're investing so much into a car that's worth so little - that ship has sailed, and we're OK with spending the money to keep it running.

    Thanks!

    Is it going to be a long term car for you? If yes I’d have it done. If it’s going to be an occasional spare vehicle I’d say no, by the time anything fails the car won’t be worth anything anyway. It’s a $2500 car PP according to Edmunds. Drive it until it blows up.

    I had the same decision on the Sebring a while back and I decided given the less than 2000 miles a year I drive it not to spend the $1000 to do the belt/pump. My car is 3 years older than yours and twice the milage.
    Define long term - the first order of business is to drive it 1100 miles to Colorado, at which point I may put 3-6k on it a year. Truly a spare third car.
    It should be perfect for that after this round of maintenance. Give it an oil change and tire rotation once a year for peace of mind and you will be fine for many years.

    2008 Toyota Land Cruiser White over Tan
    2017 BMW X1 Jet Black over Mocha

  • MichaellMichaell ColoradoModerator Posts: 183,397
    au1994 said:

    Michaell said:

    Michaell said:

    I know I've mentioned my mom's car on this thread before - 2003 Hyundai Sonata GLS V6, with only 40K on it.

    My sister has taken possession of it and has had her local mechanic look things over. He proclaimed it was in pretty good condition.

    There were, however, a few issues that we felt was best handled by the dealer - the cruise control wasn't working, and there was a problem with the fuel filler neck that prevented gas from the nozzle to flow at a regular rate. The car is at the dealer now, and they are claiming that the timing belt needs to be replaced on top of the work we've already authorized.

    Dealer says it should be changed every 5 years or 60,000 miles, so technically, it should have been changed 3 times by now. They want to charge $795 for the work - but, this does not include replacing the water pump.

    My sister called her independent guy today, and he says that we he looked over the car a couple months back, he didn't see anything wrong with the belt that would require it to be replaced. When asked, he quoted $1000 for both the timing belt and water pump replacement.

    So, do we:
    1. Do nothing
    2. Replace the belt only
    3. Replace the belt and water pump

    At some point in the near future, I'm going to collect the car and bring it back to Colorado, and I'm leaning to either (1) or (3), but wanted to ping the expertise here at CCBA for your opinions. No comments along the lines of why we're investing so much into a car that's worth so little - that ship has sailed, and we're OK with spending the money to keep it running.

    Thanks!

    Is it going to be a long term car for you? If yes I’d have it done. If it’s going to be an occasional spare vehicle I’d say no, by the time anything fails the car won’t be worth anything anyway. It’s a $2500 car PP according to Edmunds. Drive it until it blows up.

    I had the same decision on the Sebring a while back and I decided given the less than 2000 miles a year I drive it not to spend the $1000 to do the belt/pump. My car is 3 years older than yours and twice the milage.
    Define long term - the first order of business is to drive it 1100 miles to Colorado, at which point I may put 3-6k on it a year. Truly a spare third car.
    It should be perfect for that after this round of maintenance. Give it an oil change and tire rotation once a year for peace of mind and you will be fine for many years.
    Exactly my thinking. I'll probably invest a few hundred $$$'s into a CarPlay compatible head unit and some winter floor mats, but other than that, it should be good.

    Edmunds Lease Calculator
    Did you get a good deal? Be sure to come back and let us know! Post a pic of your new purchase or lease!


    MODERATOR

    2015 Subaru Outback 3.6R / 2014 MINI Countryman S ALL4

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaMember Posts: 15,004
    edited October 2020
    VW just introduced the new VW Taos, a compact crossover. It sounds like it is essentially replacing the Golf in North America.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2020/10/2022-volkswagen-taos-vw-fills-another-crossover-niche/


    Another option for @Sandman6472 to consider. It appeals to me as well.

    2017 Cadillac ATS Performance Premium 3.6, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • mjfloyd1mjfloyd1 Member Posts: 1,217
    edited October 2020
    au1994 said:

    Belt and tensioner, yes. 40k on a water pump should be nothing and you could do it the next time you do the belt. Definitely have the other rubber bits checked. With that low of miles it obviously did some sitting which isn’t good for most of the parts on a car.

    I looked online and the whole kit with timing belt, tensioners and water pump was less than $90

    https://www.partsgeek.com/mmparts/timing_belt/hyundai/sonata.html
  • Sandman6472Sandman6472 Coral Springs, FLMember Posts: 5,728
    "Winner, winner...chicken dinner"! Yep, that VW Taos looks like it could be a contender for my next vehicle. The added length could be an issue as my Golf is basically 168". But, I'll try it anyways and go from there. I brought the 2015 Jetta home first and it was longer than I really wanted plus, I like a hatchback. So, as much as I love the Audi Q3, this VW Taos will fit the bill much better and probably be less costly to purchase. One mistake I won't do again is not to try the "SEL" model first. I've got the "SE" model now and should've gone for the "SEL" to begin with. So, hopefully won't make that mistake a second time. All really depends on the alloy rim size and design and the audio systems offered. Have the Fender system now and it's pretty decent so would have to get the Beats system if push came to shove. One never knows but my next new vehicle could end up being the last one I ever get...I just don't know!
    But, I do like the new 2022 VW Taos...a lot!

    2015 Audi A3 (wife) / 2015 Golf TSI (me) / 2019 Chevrolet Cruze Premier RS (daughter #1) / 2020 Hyundai Accent SE (daughter #2)

  • oldfarmer50oldfarmer50 Member Posts: 17,849
    edited October 2020
    Michaell said:

    Michaell said:

    I know I've mentioned my mom's car on this thread before - 2003 Hyundai Sonata GLS V6, with only 40K on it.

    My sister has taken possession of it and has had her local mechanic look things over. He proclaimed it was in pretty good condition.

    There were, however, a few issues that we felt was best handled by the dealer - the cruise control wasn't working, and there was a problem with the fuel filler neck that prevented gas from the nozzle to flow at a regular rate. The car is at the dealer now, and they are claiming that the timing belt needs to be replaced on top of the work we've already authorized.

    Dealer says it should be changed every 5 years or 60,000 miles, so technically, it should have been changed 3 times by now. They want to charge $795 for the work - but, this does not include replacing the water pump.

    My sister called her independent guy today, and he says that we he looked over the car a couple months back, he didn't see anything wrong with the belt that would require it to be replaced. When asked, he quoted $1000 for both the timing belt and water pump replacement.

    So, do we:
    1. Do nothing
    2. Replace the belt only
    3. Replace the belt and water pump

    At some point in the near future, I'm going to collect the car and bring it back to Colorado, and I'm leaning to either (1) or (3), but wanted to ping the expertise here at CCBA for your opinions. No comments along the lines of why we're investing so much into a car that's worth so little - that ship has sailed, and we're OK with spending the money to keep it running.

    Thanks!

    Is it going to be a long term car for you? If yes I’d have it done. If it’s going to be an occasional spare vehicle I’d say no, by the time anything fails the car won’t be worth anything anyway. It’s a $2500 car PP according to Edmunds. Drive it until it blows up.

    I had the same decision on the Sebring a while back and I decided given the less than 2000 miles a year I drive it not to spend the $1000 to do the belt/pump. My car is 3 years older than yours and twice the milage.
    Define long term - the first order of business is to drive it 1100 miles to Colorado, at which point I may put 3-6k on it a year. Truly a spare third car.
    Long term--more than 5 years, more than 5k miles a year.
    Occasional spare—Less than 2k miles a year for as long as it lasts.

    You’re right on the cusp of where I’d bite the bullet. I asked a while ago similar advice on changing the timing belt on the Sebring and the consensus was not to bother, considering the miles I drove it.

    If you’re worried that it won’t make it the 1100 miles back to Colorado I’d sell it where it is and pocket the money.

    2019 Kia Soul+, 2015 Mustang GT, 2004 Chevy Van, 2000 Chrysler Sebring convertible

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